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Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong,

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Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong, [#permalink] New post 07 Apr 2009, 10:05
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Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong, jazz singer Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect, recomposed songs to suit her range, style, and artistic sensibilities.

(A) Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened
(B) Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice in a similar way to how other musicians play instruments, in ranging freely over the beat, flattening
(C) Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians played instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening
(D) Billie Holiday used her voice in the same way that other musicians use their instruments, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening
(E) Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians Instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening

Set26-3
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 07 Apr 2009, 11:12
WORDY but D is wright,IMO


AB OUT--modifier
C--use of LIKE
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 07 Apr 2009, 11:43
Economist wrote:
Set26-3

Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong, jazz singer Billie Holiday’s
approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged
freely over the beat, flattened
out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect,
recomposed songs to suit her range, style, and artistic sensibilities.

A. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument,
in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened.
B. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice in a similar way
to how other musicians play instruments, in ranging freely over the beat,
flattening.
C. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
played instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.
D. Billie Holiday used her voice in the same way that other musicians use their
instruments, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening.
E. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
Instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.


A, B out for comparision (comparing Billie Holiday’s to Louis Armstrong) ..

C akward with 'other musicians played instruments'

between D and E ... E may be not good for using 'Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice'

my pick is D ....

please feel free to correct my above explained logic if you see any wrong in my analysis.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2009, 20:18
OA is D.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2009, 20:37
ugimba wrote:
Economist wrote:
Set26-3

Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong, jazz singer Billie Holiday’s
approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged
freely over the beat, flattened
out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect,
recomposed songs to suit her range, style, and artistic sensibilities.

A. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument,
in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened.
B. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice in a similar way
to how other musicians play instruments, in ranging freely over the beat,
flattening.
C. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
played instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.
D. Billie Holiday used her voice in the same way that other musicians use their
instruments, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening.
E. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
Instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.


A, B out for comparision (comparing Billie Holiday’s to Louis Armstrong) ..

C akward with 'other musicians played instruments'

between D and E ... E may be not good for using 'Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice'

my pick is D ....

please feel free to correct my above explained logic if you see any wrong in my analysis.


Would you care to elaborate on your explanations for C and E? My take is C and E are incorrect due to use of like. If we can replace like in C with 'as', probably thats the best choice. In E we need possessive pronoun to address musician's instruments.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2009, 21:10
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A. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument,
in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened. – as we are comparing Armstrong with Holiday’s approach and the singing process is continuous hence flattened is wrong.
B. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice in a similar way
to how other musicians play instruments, in ranging freely over the beat,
flattening.- - as we are comparing Armstrong with Holiday’s approach and the singing process is continuous hence flattened is wrong.
C. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
played instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening. – who is ranging freely over beat the musicians or Billie not clear. Hence out.
D. Billie Holiday used her voice in the same way that other musicians use their
instruments, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening. – very clear wording and meaning.
E. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
Instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening. – problem with billing using her voice like other played instruments.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2010, 07:04
D ~ For using the correct modified subject of "Billie Holiday" following the first comma and then by using proper parallelism when comparing "used her voice" to "use their instruments".

Little wordy but gets the job done.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2010, 10:09
Wordy but D :)
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2010, 22:40
A and B are out because of Billie Holiday’s
C and E out because of "like"

D wins
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2010, 21:55
modifier + possesive case

and D
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2010, 04:12
Good one. It deserves to be a real GMAT SC.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 02 May 2011, 03:14
D
A, B - incorrect modifier
C,E- usage of 'like' chaged the meaning
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 02 May 2011, 07:27
Quote:
Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong, jazz singer Billie Holiday’s
approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged
freely over the beat, flattened out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect,
recomposed songs to suit her range, style, and artistic sensibilities.

A. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument,
in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened.
B. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice in a similar way
to how other musicians play instruments, in ranging freely over the beat,
flattening.
C. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
played instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.
D. Billie Holiday used her voice in the same way that other musicians use their
instruments, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening.
E. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
Instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.



Can someone explain to me why the two words I put in bold above (flattened, recomposed) don't need to stay parallel to each other? I thought A was the best choice because flattening, which is found in answers B-D, doesn't match with the tense of recomposed.

In short, this sounds off to me: ...in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect, recomposed songs to suit.... If recomposed were recomposing that would make more sense.

It also seems to me that 'the technique of Louis Armstrong' refers to his technique and not Louis Armstrong himself. Therefore, comparing the 'the technique of Louis Armstrong' to 'Billie Holiday's approach to singing' would not be incorrect because they both in one way or another refer to a singing technique.

Also, this is one of my first posts on the forum. I've been lurking for a bit but I've recently begun studying more consistently and so I wanted to begin posting on the forum as well. So, hello to everyone.

Thanks for the help!

Brian
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 02 May 2011, 22:21
Economist wrote:
Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong, jazz singer Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect, recomposed songs to suit her range, style, and artistic sensibilities.

(A) Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened
(B) Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice in a similar way to how other musicians play instruments, in ranging freely over the beat, flattening
(C) Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians played instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening
(D) Billie Holiday used her voice in the same way that other musicians use their instruments, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening
(E) Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians Instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening

Set26-3


A and B are out straight away. Come to C and E.

using her voice like other musicians played instruments
using her voice like other musicians Instruments

How can anybody use his/her voice like musician's played instrument :? .....I mean you can use some thing like sth else only ...for example

using x like y

i found C wrong. Among D and E: What ranged freely? She only and this is also stated in A...

Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged freely over the beat

So E has problem here....so D should be the one...obviously not constructed in a nice manner....so not the best answer but correct among the choices.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 02 May 2011, 22:44
D rules because of proper comparison of voice to using instruments. subordinating verb flattening is correct for the verb ranged.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 03 May 2011, 00:27
D it is. Quite a wordy ans awkward choice.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2011, 02:11
D is wordy but correct
Experts, Pls explain "E"
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2011, 04:18
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bgphelps wrote:
Can someone explain to me why the two words I put in bold above (flattened, recomposed) don't need to stay parallel to each other? I thought A was the best choice because flattening, which is found in answers B-D, doesn't match with the tense of recomposed.

In short, this sounds off to me: ...in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect, recomposed songs to suit.... If recomposed were recomposing that would make more sense.

It also seems to me that 'the technique of Louis Armstrong' refers to his technique and not Louis Armstrong himself. Therefore, comparing the 'the technique of Louis Armstrong' to 'Billie Holiday's approach to singing' would not be incorrect because they both in one way or another refer to a singing technique.

Also, this is one of my first posts on the forum. I've been lurking for a bit but I've recently begun studying more consistently and so I wanted to begin posting on the forum as well. So, hello to everyone.

Thanks for the help!

Brian

'recomposed' is actually parallel to 'ranged'.
she ranged freely and recomposed songs. 'flattening' just describes HOW she ranged freely, so it need not be parallel with rest of the sentence.
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2011, 02:55
bgphelps wrote:
Quote:
Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong, jazz singer Billie Holiday’s
approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged
freely over the beat, flattened out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect,
recomposed songs to suit her range, style, and artistic sensibilities.

A. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument,
in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened.
B. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice in a similar way
to how other musicians play instruments, in ranging freely over the beat,
flattening.
C. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
played instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.
D. Billie Holiday used her voice in the same way that other musicians use their
instruments, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening.
E. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
Instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.



Can someone explain to me why the two words I put in bold above (flattened, recomposed) don't need to stay parallel to each other? I thought A was the best choice because flattening, which is found in answers B-D, doesn't match with the tense of recomposed.

In short, this sounds off to me: ...in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect, recomposed songs to suit.... If recomposed were recomposing that would make more sense.

It also seems to me that 'the technique of Louis Armstrong' refers to his technique and not Louis Armstrong himself. Therefore, comparing the 'the technique of Louis Armstrong' to 'Billie Holiday's approach to singing' would not be incorrect because they both in one way or another refer to a singing technique.

Also, this is one of my first posts on the forum. I've been lurking for a bit but I've recently begun studying more consistently and so I wanted to begin posting on the forum as well. So, hello to everyone.

Thanks for the help!

Brian



"..she ranged freely over the beat, flattening out the melodic tunes...."

flattening out the melodic tunes tries to explain how she ranged freely over the beat. Technically, it modifies the clause "she ranged freely over the beat"
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Re: Louis Armstrong [#permalink] New post 12 Sep 2011, 04:05
bgphelps wrote:
Quote:
Deliberately imitating the technique of Louis Armstrong, jazz singer Billie Holiday’s
approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument, in that she ranged
freely over the beat, flattened out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect,
recomposed songs to suit her range, style, and artistic sensibilities.

A. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice like an instrument,
in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattened.
B. Billie Holiday’s approach to singing was to use her voice in a similar way
to how other musicians play instruments, in ranging freely over the beat,
flattening.
C. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
played instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.
D. Billie Holiday used her voice in the same way that other musicians use their
instruments, in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening.
E. Billie Holiday approached singing by using her voice like other musicians
Instruments, ranging freely over the beat, flattening.



Can someone explain to me why the two words I put in bold above (flattened, recomposed) don't need to stay parallel to each other? I thought A was the best choice because flattening, which is found in answers B-D, doesn't match with the tense of recomposed.

In short, this sounds off to me: ...in that she ranged freely over the beat, flattening out the melodic contours of tunes, and, in effect, recomposed songs to suit.... If recomposed were recomposing that would make more sense.

It also seems to me that 'the technique of Louis Armstrong' refers to his technique and not Louis Armstrong himself. Therefore, comparing the 'the technique of Louis Armstrong' to 'Billie Holiday's approach to singing' would not be incorrect because they both in one way or another refer to a singing technique.

Also, this is one of my first posts on the forum. I've been lurking for a bit but I've recently begun studying more consistently and so I wanted to begin posting on the forum as well. So, hello to everyone.

Thanks for the help!

Brian


I am bad at explaining but if you read the sentence closely, it starts with - 'Deliberately imitating...', now after the comma we have someone's technique, can a technique imitate something? no, it has to be a person, a person can imitae a technique. That's why A and B are out. IMO D.
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Re: Louis Armstrong   [#permalink] 12 Sep 2011, 04:05
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