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does? [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2008, 21:36
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Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2008, 22:46
Is it D ?
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2008, 11:02
I too with D.
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2008, 11:09
I think A is correct.

B is wordy and awkward.

C also wordy. It's the longest answer of the choices.

D is redundant with the last "does". It makes sense that the word "does" would be necessary there, or at least the idea of it is necessary, but the actual word it not because this concept of "apprentice work reads" is implied by the rest of the sentence.

E the use of "unlike" is not correct here. Often we see "unlike" used as the first word in an appositive, such as "Tiger Woods, unlike Michelle Wie, can win on the PGA tour." When we use "unlike" in the form of an adverb rather than adjective, it is much more awkward. I'm not sure that it is completely, or always wrong, but it is odd. He runs unlike Usain Bolt. vs. He does not run like Usain Bolt. We use the word "not".

lgon wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work

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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2008, 13:04
I like D too... but it could be A too
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2008, 14:41
I would have gone with D on the test
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2008, 21:30
Hi allen,

This is really difficult one. Without using POE, hopw do you say that A is correct? I also eliminated some of the choices but could not find a most asute way to say that A is correct.

D: Unlike what you said, D is not redundant rather it incorrectly used "like" to compare the clauses.
B &C: B and C are too wordy.
E: In E, unlike is used incorrectly.




Does anybody has a very clear explanation for this question? Its really unclear and still confusing..

jallenmorris wrote:
I think A is correct.

B is wordy and awkward.

C also wordy. It's the longest answer of the choices.

D is redundant with the last "does". It makes sense that the word "does" would be necessary there, or at least the idea of it is necessary, but the actual word it not because this concept of "apprentice work reads" is implied by the rest of the sentence.
E the use of "unlike" is not correct here. Often we see "unlike" used as the first word in an appositive, such as "Tiger Woods, unlike Michelle Wie, can win on the PGA tour." When we use "unlike" in the form of an adverb rather than adjective, it is much more awkward. I'm not sure that it is completely, or always wrong, but it is odd. He runs unlike Usain Bolt. vs. He does not run like Usain Bolt. We use the word "not".

lgon wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work

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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2008, 22:16
I go for C. although it is the most lenghty but all other choices convey the meaning that the book reads.
lgon wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 01:34
Its time for QA lgon ??
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 04:50
GMAT TIGER,

D uses "like" correctly. If "like" is not used correctly, then A must be incorrect as well because A uses "like" in the same manner. It appears that you have chosen A as the correct answer by POE, but the only difference between A and D is the word "does" at the end of each answer. Since this is the only difference, it must be the source of the error, otherwise, B, C or E is correct, which we both eliminated as incorrect.

GMAT TIGER wrote:
Hi allen,

This is really difficult one. Without using POE, hopw do you say that A is correct? I also eliminated some of the choices but could not find a most asute way to say that A is correct.

D: Unlike what you said, D is not redundant rather it incorrectly used "like" to compare the clauses.
B &C: B and C are too wordy.
E: In E, unlike is used incorrectly.




Does anybody has a very clear explanation for this question? Its really unclear and still confusing..

jallenmorris wrote:
I think A is correct.

B is wordy and awkward.

C also wordy. It's the longest answer of the choices.

D is redundant with the last "does". It makes sense that the word "does" would be necessary there, or at least the idea of it is necessary, but the actual word it not because this concept of "apprentice work reads" is implied by the rest of the sentence.
E the use of "unlike" is not correct here. Often we see "unlike" used as the first word in an appositive, such as "Tiger Woods, unlike Michelle Wie, can win on the PGA tour." When we use "unlike" in the form of an adverb rather than adjective, it is much more awkward. I'm not sure that it is completely, or always wrong, but it is odd. He runs unlike Usain Bolt. vs. He does not run like Usain Bolt. We use the word "not".

lgon wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work

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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 04:56
Also, regarding the post that says some of the answers seem to say that the book reads, as in the book is doing the reading, this usage is correct. Compare the two sentences:

1. He looks to the left.

2. The stove looks hot.

In the second sentence, "looks" is synonymous with "appears to be". In the case of "the book does not read like...", this does not mean the book is doing the reading, but means something else which can be a very confusing usage. It is not easy to define, but my best attempt at doing so is that "the book reads" is leading into a description of how we read the book. "The book reads easily." This means that the book is not complex, and the reader has no difficulty in reading the book. Or, "That was a quick read." means that the reader was able to finish the book quikly. This is a very odd usage and is difficult to explain and I've spoken English all my life. I'm sorry if this does not help make this concept clear.
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 04:58
Sorry for 3 posts in a row. Here is a link I found when I Googled the question:

http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/ori ... t3624.html

It says the OA is A. Has some decent discussion as well.

Check this out as well (Question 14):

http://www.thorpeseducation.com/Thorpes ... ET%203.pdf
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 09:31
I understand your reasponing but would view D as incorrect use of "like". If you see the structure, D has "like" + a clause. This structure is never correct.


Thanks for all your effocrts, links and explanations..


jallenmorris wrote:
GMAT TIGER,

D uses "like" correctly. If "like" is not used correctly, then A must be incorrect as well because A uses "like" in the same manner. It appears that you have chosen A as the correct answer by POE, but the only difference between A and D is the word "does" at the end of each answer. Since this is the only difference, it must be the source of the error, otherwise, B, C or E is correct, which we both eliminated as incorrect.

lgon wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.

(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work

_________________

Verbal: new-to-the-verbal-forum-please-read-this-first-77546.html
Math: new-to-the-math-forum-please-read-this-first-77764.html
Gmat: everything-you-need-to-prepare-for-the-gmat-revised-77983.html


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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 10:02
I'm not sure I see the "like" + a clause. I'm not sure that "an apprentice work does" is a clause. What exactly is the definition of a "clause"? I'm not sure how I would define it.

GMAT TIGER wrote:
I understand your reasponing but would view D as incorrect use of "like". If you see the structure, D has "like" + a clause. This structure is never correct.


Thanks for all your effocrts, links and explanations..


jallenmorris wrote:
GMAT TIGER,

D uses "like" correctly. If "like" is not used correctly, then A must be incorrect as well because A uses "like" in the same manner. It appears that you have chosen A as the correct answer by POE, but the only difference between A and D is the word "does" at the end of each answer. Since this is the only difference, it must be the source of the error, otherwise, B, C or E is correct, which we both eliminated as incorrect.

lgon wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.

(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work

_________________

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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 13:05
CLAUSE HAS:

1. SUBJECT + VERB OR
2. SUBJECT + VERB + OBJECT OR COMPLEMENT


So "an apprentice work does" is a clause.



jallenmorris wrote:
I'm not sure I see the "like" + a clause. I'm not sure that "an apprentice work does" is a clause. What exactly is the definition of a "clause"? I'm not sure how I would define it.

GMAT TIGER wrote:
I understand your reasponing but would view D as incorrect use of "like". If you see the structure, D has "like" + a clause. This structure is never correct.


Thanks for all your effocrts, links and explanations..


lgon wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.

(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work

_________________

Verbal: new-to-the-verbal-forum-please-read-this-first-77546.html
Math: new-to-the-math-forum-please-read-this-first-77764.html
Gmat: everything-you-need-to-prepare-for-the-gmat-revised-77983.html


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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 13:24
Wouldn't it be incomplete? "does" can be a verb, but here I think "does read" is implied, even though "read" is not in it.

Sorry I can't come up with a better explanation.

GMAT TIGER wrote:
CLAUSE HAS:

1. SUBJECT + VERB OR
2. SUBJECT + VERB + OBJECT OR COMPLEMENT


So "an apprentice work does" is a clause.

_________________

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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 13:41
For the purpose of being a clause, its complete. Even if it has "read" implied, it is still a clause.

So far the issue is whether "an apprentice work does" is a clause, its a clause. However, I agree that the meaning could be incomplete.


jallenmorris wrote:
Wouldn't it be incomplete? "does" can be a verb, but here I think "does read" is implied, even though "read" is not in it.

Sorry I can't come up with a better explanation.

GMAT TIGER wrote:
CLAUSE HAS:

1. SUBJECT + VERB OR
2. SUBJECT + VERB + OBJECT OR COMPLEMENT


So "an apprentice work does" is a clause.

_________________

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Math: new-to-the-math-forum-please-read-this-first-77764.html
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 20:49
i have a confusion on usage of like vs. as
i thought "like" is used to compare nouns (like and "as" to compare actions.

In the given problem we are comparing how her first novel read when compared with apprentice work. shouldnt we be using "as" against "like".

So C even though the wordiest seems to be correct.
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2008, 21:14
Yes that was my post. and thanks for explaining so wondefully. I have understud where i was wrong. english not being my native language, i took its literal meaning :oops:
jallenmorris wrote:
Also, regarding the post that says some of the answers seem to say that the book reads, as in the book is doing the reading, this usage is correct. Compare the two sentences:

1. He looks to the left.

2. The stove looks hot.

In the second sentence, "looks" is synonymous with "appears to be". In the case of "the book does not read like...", this does not mean the book is doing the reading, but means something else which can be a very confusing usage. It is not easy to define, but my best attempt at doing so is that "the book reads" is leading into a description of how we read the book. "The book reads easily." This means that the book is not complex, and the reader has no difficulty in reading the book. Or, "That was a quick read." means that the reader was able to finish the book quikly. This is a very odd usage and is difficult to explain and I've spoken English all my life. I'm sorry if this does not help make this concept clear.
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Re: does? [#permalink] New post 16 Dec 2008, 07:01
Thanks.. OA is A!
Lots of discussion we had, but still I feel that D should be the choice.(ellipsis)
ritula wrote:
I go for C. although it is the most lenghty but all other choices convey the meaning that the book reads.
lgon wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work
Re: does?   [#permalink] 16 Dec 2008, 07:01
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