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Dount in Manhattan SC advanced concept use of "As"

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Dount in Manhattan SC advanced concept use of "As" [#permalink] New post 29 Feb 2012, 21:30
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Hi friends,

I came across the usage of "AS" with noun phrases

Preposition As is used with a noun or noun phrase. It also has three uses:

Function As:AS your leader, I am in charge. (= in the role of)
Equation As:I think of you AS my friend. (= you are my ftiend)
Stage As:AS a child, I thought I could fly. (= when I was)

But i read in the same Manhattan that Like is a preposition. This means that LIKE must be followed by nouns, pronouns, or noun phrases.

So My doubt is whether noun phrase is preceded by "As" or "Like"?

You can refer the usage of "As" in Manhattan Book SC advanced page no #255(printed copy) or #249(soft copy)

Thanks in advance

Regards
Srinath
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Re: Dount in Manhattan SC advanced concept use of "As" [#permalink] New post 01 Mar 2012, 05:35
I think the easier way for not getting confused will be to have this rule in mind.

As is followed by clause(a phrase which has subject and verb).

However "like", I believe is never followed by a verb.
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Re: Dount in Manhattan SC advanced concept use of "As" [#permalink] New post 01 Mar 2012, 06:55
Like is a preposition use to compare nouns and noun phrases.

As can be used to compare two clauses,two action as well.
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Re: Dount in Manhattan SC advanced concept use of "As" [#permalink] New post 28 Jun 2014, 08:06
ENAFEX wrote:
I think the easier way for not getting confused will be to have this rule in mind.

As is followed by clause(a phrase which has subject and verb).

However "like", I believe is never followed by a verb.


Actually Like can be followed by a verb, eg- Like swimming,jogging is good for health.
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Re: Dount in Manhattan SC advanced concept use of "As" [#permalink] New post 28 Jun 2014, 14:19
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Careful, gauravsoni--in this context, swimming is a noun (gerund), not a verb. It describes an activity, not an action. It's the difference between "Cooking good food is not always easy" (Cooking=noun) and "He is cooking dinner" (cooking=verb).

The word "like" only compares nouns (unless we're using the verb form--"I like to cook."). "As" has many uses, as the guide suggests, and one of them is a prepositional form. So the answer to your original question, mydreammba, is "Yes." Both "like" and "as" can precede a noun phrase, depending on what we're trying to say:

As entry-level employees, Kelly and Hank are poorly paid and have little job security. (The word "as" indicates that Kelly and Henry are entry-level employees, and in this position/role, they are poorly paid and have little job security.)

Like entry-level employees, Kelly and Hank are poorly paid and have little job security. (The word "like" indicates that Kelly and Hank are similar to entry-level employees in terms of pay and job security, but they are not actually entry-level. Perhaps they have plenty of experience in very bad jobs!)

I hope this helps!
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Re: Dount in Manhattan SC advanced concept use of "As" [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2014, 01:15
DmitryFarber wrote:
Careful, gauravsoni--in this context, swimming is a noun (gerund), not a verb. It describes an activity, not an action. It's the difference between "Cooking good food is not always easy" (Cooking=noun) and "He is cooking dinner" (cooking=verb).

The word "like" only compares nouns (unless we're using the verb form--"I like to cook."). "As" has many uses, as the guide suggests, and one of them is a prepositional form. So the answer to your original question, mydreammba, is "Yes." Both "like" and "as" can precede a noun phrase, depending on what we're trying to say:

As entry-level employees, Kelly and Hank are poorly paid and have little job security. (The word "as" indicates that Kelly and Henry are entry-level employees, and in this position/role, they are poorly paid and have little job security.)

Like entry-level employees, Kelly and Hank are poorly paid and have little job security. (The word "like" indicates that Kelly and Hank are similar to entry-level employees in terms of pay and job security, but they are not actually entry-level. Perhaps they have plenty of experience in very bad jobs!)

I hope this helps!



Ahh thanks for the explanation Dmitry Farber
Re: Dount in Manhattan SC advanced concept use of "As"   [#permalink] 29 Jun 2014, 01:15
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