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Dr. Sayres lecture recounted several little-known episodes

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Dr. Sayres lecture recounted several little-known episodes [#permalink] New post 07 Jul 2007, 12:42
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254. Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.
(A) relations between nations that illustrates
(B) relation of one nation with another that illustrates
(C) relations between nations that illustrate
(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate
(E) relations of nations that illustrates
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Re: SC - Dr. Sayre’s lecture [#permalink] New post 07 Jul 2007, 13:01
vishalsuri wrote:
254. Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.
(A) relations between nations that illustrates
(B) relation of one nation with another that illustrates
(C) relations between nations that illustrate
(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate
(E) relations of nations that illustrates


(B) i know it is wired but go with B using POE, which is sometime very useful.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Jul 2007, 15:24
i would say OA is C.

relations between nations that illustrate


It says episodes in the relations between nations .

Illustrate needs to be plural as it is for episodes.

~sara
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Jul 2007, 15:25
saransh wrote:
i would take C.

relations between nations that illustrate


It says episodes in the relations between nations .

Illustrate needs to be plural as it is for episodes.

~sara



but it should be relations "among" nations and not relations "between" nations ..
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2007, 09:35
i'm thinking C as well.

Among is used for more than 2 objects. Generally, alliances are between 2 nations, not among many nationas.

What's the OA?
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2007, 12:04
Should be B.
"Relation of one nation with another" is correct usage here.
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Re: SC - Dr. Sayre’s lecture [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2007, 12:25
vishalsuri wrote:
254. Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.
(A) relations between nations that illustrates
(B) relation of one nation with another that illustrates
(C) relations between nations that illustrate
(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate
(E) relations of nations that illustrates


any choice that uses "illustrates" is wrong because the subject is plural (episodes).

C is the best choice.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 04:04
Will go with C. Relations is correct since there may be more than one kind of relation.
and relations go with illustrate.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 08:22
Between cannot be used when talking about more than 2 entities. I will go with B because that sounds more idiomatic..
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 08:44
C looks really good., assuming that the relations are between two countries.

I will really complain if I get a problem like this in the test.
It's a little vague.
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Re: SC - Dr. Sayre’s lecture [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 08:52
vishalsuri wrote:
254. Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.
(A) relations between nations that illustrates
(B) relation of one nation with another that illustrates
(C) relations between nations that illustrate
(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate
(E) relations of nations that illustrates


Hmm thought of something.

The comparison is between nations that illustrate what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.

You are comparing two kinds of nations only, nations that illustrate what is wrong with alliances and nations that illustrate treaties that do not have popular support. You are not comparing among nations, but nations as a whole.

Example.... "between nations that are democratic and nations that are communist." You are comparing two nations as a singular group.

I am not sure about this one. Am I making sense?
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Re: SC - Dr. Sayre’s lecture [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 09:59
shoonya wrote:
vishalsuri wrote:
254. Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.
(A) relations between nations that illustrates
(B) relation of one nation with another that illustrates
(C) relations between nations that illustrate
(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate
(E) relations of nations that illustrates


any choice that uses "illustrates" is wrong because the subject is plural (episodes).

C is the best choice.


But in this sentence, "illustrates" does not refer to "episodes."

B.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 10:08
I think this is C. Let me illustrate this. Some of you who argue for the use of among are right in your own sense. But look at the sentence and the choices provided. The sentence talks abt the one to one relation between all the nations. In mathematical terms for all u wizards we are talking abt nC2 relations existing between n nations. Hope this helps. I am interested in the OA and OE
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 10:20
OA is B.

It cannot be relations between nations because between is used for only two parties whereas we are talking about various parties (because we are talking about treaties and alliances)

my only question is what is illustrates in agreement with?
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 10:24
B is plain wrong. Episodes are the ones that do the illustrating. Episodes is plural. The OA cannot be B
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2007, 10:27
bmwhype2 wrote:
OA is B.

It cannot be relations between nations because between is used for only two parties whereas we are talking about various parties (because we are talking about treaties and alliances)

my only question is what is illustrates in agreement with?


relation, which is refered by "that".

Quote:
any choice that uses "illustrates" is wrong because the subject is plural (episodes).

C is the best choice.


Shoonya's explanation has also point.
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Re: SC - Dr. Sayre’s lecture [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2007, 12:33
vishalsuri wrote:
254. Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.
(A) relations between nations that illustrates
(B) relation of one nation with another that illustrates
(C) relations between nations that illustrate
(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate
(E) relations of nations that illustrates


relation (of one nation with another) that illustrates

she jumps
relation illustrates
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Re: SC - Dr. Sayre’s lecture [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2007, 03:49
Initially I chose C, but now I can see that it is B.

B) Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relation of one nation with another that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.

Actually, the whole blue section is a long and complex prepositional phrase with "relation" being the Object of the phrase. "of one nation with another" is modifying(adj) "relation". "illustrates" refers to "relation" and is correct

C) Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrate what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.

Almost always "between" is followed by a statement about two objects; therefore, we need "among" here. Plurality of "relations" changes the meaning, and even with the modifier such as "among nations" it would still create ambiguities. I will post the sources for such reasoning in the next post.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2007, 03:59
Singular Subjects, Plural Predicates, etc.

See below or click on the link: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/ ... #irregular


We frequently run into a situation in which a singular subject is linked to a plural predicate:

E.g. My favorite breakfast is cereal with fruit, milk, orange juice, and toast.

Sometimes, too, a plural subject can be linked to singular predicate:

E.g. Mistakes in parallelism are the only problem here.

In such situations, remember that the number (singular or plural) of the subject, not the predicate, determines the number of the verb. See the section on Subject-Verb Agreement for further help.

A special situation exists when a subject seems not to agree with its predicate. For instance, when we want each student to see his or her counselor (and each student is assigned to only one counselor), but we want to avoid that "his or her" construction by pluralizing, do we say "Students must see their counselors" or "Students must see their counselor"? The singular counselor is necesssary to avoid the implication that students have more than one counselor apiece. Do we say "Many sons dislike their father or fathers"? We don't mean to suggest that the sons have more than one father, so we use the singular father. Theodore Bernstein, in Dos, Don'ts and Maybes of English Usage, says that "Idiomatically the noun applying to more than one person remains in the singular when (a) it represents a quality or thing possessed in common ("The audience's curiosity was aroused"); or (b) it is an abstraction ("The judges applied their reason to the problem"), or (c) it is a figurative word ("All ten children had a sweet tooth") (203). Sometimes good sense will have to guide you. We might want to say "Puzzled, the children scratched their head" to avoid the image of multi-headed children, but "The audience rose to their foot" is plainly ridiculous and about to tip over.

In "The boys moved their car/cars," the plural would indicate that each boy owned a car, the singular that the boys (together) owned one car (which is quite possible). It is also possible that each boy owned more than one car. Be prepared for such situations, and consider carefully the implications of using either the singular or the plural. You might have to avoid the problem by going the opposite direction of pluralizing: moving things to the singular and talking about what each boy did.
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Re: SC - Dr. Sayre’s lecture [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2007, 12:39
botirvoy wrote:
Initially I chose C, but now I can see that it is B.

B) Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relation of one nation with another that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.

Actually, the whole blue section is a long and complex prepositional phrase with "relation" being the Object of the phrase. "of one nation with another" is modifying(adj) "relation". "illustrates" refers to "relation" and is correct

C) Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrate what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.

Almost always "between" is followed by a statement about two objects; therefore, we need "among" here. Plurality of "relations" changes the meaning, and even with the modifier such as "among nations" it would still create ambiguities. I will post the sources for such reasoning in the next post.



Hello Botirvoy,

Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates...

the peropositional phrase <in> modifies 'episodes' it is ''certain episodes which 'illustrate', not entire relationship 'illustrates.

To me answer is C:)
Re: SC - Dr. Sayre’s lecture   [#permalink] 14 Jul 2007, 12:39
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