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During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the

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During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 22:45
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During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in
(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater when her arms are drawn in
(C) like a figure skater who increases speed while spinning with her arms drawn in
(D) just as a spinning figure skater who increases speed by drawing in her arms
(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2004, 13:02
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Parallelism at work here

the non-underlined part says - the buildup .. and drop ... speed up the earth's rotation .. just as a spinning figure skater increases her speed ..

The remaining part should be parallel in form.

In choice D - the pronoun who distorts parallelism because the focus of the sentence shifts to the skater (who increases her speed) .. it may also imply the existence of some skaters who MAY NOT be able to do so.
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 22:49
Best choice D.

This is to do with the usage of "LIKE" and "JUST AS".

Between D and E, E has awkward construction. D is best.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2004, 00:38
correct!

Could you please elaborate on the usage of 'like' and 'just as'...
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2004, 00:44
I mean E is the right answer...

but my doubt still remains... why choose 'just as' over 'like' ??
Can someone please explain?
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2004, 00:54
use LIKE when you compare nouns
use [JUST, MUCH, ...]AS when you compare actions (verbs)
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2004, 09:09
stolyar wrote:
use LIKE when you compare nouns
use [JUST, MUCH, ...]AS when you compare actions (verbs)


Question:
I used the same logic: [use like when you compare nouns and use "as" when you compare actions]. But arent we comparing nouns here? "The drop" & "The buildup" is being compared between a skater (noun 1) and the earth (noun 2).
"The drop" and "The buildup" arent they nouns though? It is preceded by "the" a conjunction and also answers the question "who/what" near the equator. Wouldnt the aforementioned make these words nouns?

I'd like hear you perspective pls. I came up with "C". I'm no verbal expert (scaled score of 27).
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2004, 09:16
"any exceptions to the rule?".........

Mannan: What is the correct answer? Your help is greatly appreciated.
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2004, 12:10
1:05 , E is my ans.

Here like is used as a conjunction. This is not preferred/correct usage of like.
I have copied this from a website :

Here is the rule:

Always use "like" as a preposition, never as a subordinating conjunction.

Historically, "like" has often been used as a subordinating conjunction, but in formal modern usage it is considered a definite no-no. The use of "like" as a conjunction had pretty nearly disappeared among the educated public, until a famous cigarette ad declared, "Winston tastes good like a cigarette should!"
The media have so popularized this once forbidden usage that one now hears it (and reads it) almost everywhere. But although it has become generally accepted in colloquial speech and informal writing, it is still considered questionable in formal writing. Anyone who wishes to be taken seriously as a writer needs to be very careful about unnecessarily violating this particular shibboleth, because it is seen by most teachers and editors not only as an error, but as another one of those really big errors.


Here are some examples of "like" used as a subordinating conjunction, along with corrected versions of the sentences.


EXAMPLES:


~My face felt like it had been set on fire.
My face felt as if it had been set on fire.
My face felt as though it had been set on fire.

~In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material like the teachers in high school do.
In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material, as the teachers in high school do
In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material the way the teachers in high school do.

~When I was a freshman I studied like my life depended on it.
When I was a freshman I studied as if my life depended on it.
When I was a freshman I studied as though my life depended on it.

~Some people with only a modest income try to live like they were millionaires.
Some people with only a modest income try to live as if they were millionaires.
Some people with only a modest income try to live as though they were millionaires.

The same goes for using "like" as a conjunction. It has a respectable history of being used as a conjunction, and it is commonly used that way in informal speech and writing today. But it is not commonly used that way in the formal writing of educated people, and so I will not risk my reputation for it. The fact is, it is quite simple to avoid using "like" as a conjunction, just as it is to avoid comma splices.


HTH
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2004, 13:08
It was worth running this post for two reasons. Reason one, you know and reason two the usage of "shibboleth"

Thanks ashkg
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jun 2005, 15:01
I understand the rule of "as Vs like".

As is used for introducing clauses and like is used for introducing phrases.

With that being said, why is AC "B" wrong?

like the increased speed of a figure skater when her arms are drawn in

The bolded construct is not a clause. the phrase "when her arms are drawn in" serves to modify the figure skater and therefore the subject "speed" has no verb and therefore is NOT a clause. So what is wrong with AC B?

I see AC "E" uses "as" with a clause. But why is B wrong?
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jun 2005, 15:11
Great question. I like :lol: the above explanations.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Jul 2005, 05:10
Bumping up this thread....Could someone explain why AC B is wrong?
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Jul 2005, 07:16
Thanks Gmataquaguy for bringing the question up, I picked B first too. I thought it was the case of a misplaced modifier, where the speed of the earth's rotation was being compared to the increased speed of the figure skater. I see now, that the buildup of ice, and drop in water levels near the equator is being compared with that of a figure skater who draws her arms in. I mistook the modifier.

As others have pointed out in this thread, the answer is E
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Jul 2005, 09:58
I recognize that this is a "comparison" type of question. However what i'm not sure of is why AC "B" is wrong.

If "as" is followed by a clause then the usage of "as" is correct
If "like" is followed by a phrase then the usage of "like" is correct.

To me, both B and E seem to be using "like/as" correctly in their respective choices. So i dont know why B is wrong. Is it because of "parallelism".

AC E compares "the speed up" of the buildup/drop with "the speed" of the ice skater?

In AC B, "speed" is used as a noun in the latter portion of the sentence but in the former portion "speed" is being used as a verb. Is that why B is wrong?

Could someone verify why B is wrong, in light of the fact that it uses "like" appropriately from a grammer perspective?
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Jul 2005, 11:49
Hi gmataquaguy, I think B is wrong, because this is a as versus like question. As should be used instead of like whenever an example is being quoted.

e.g. I enjoy winter sports such as skiing and snowboarding.

Like is used to express a certain similarity

e.g. Eating fruits like bananas are good for health

This sentence means, eat fruits similar to bananas.

The difference is very subtle. In the sentence , the speed of the skater is given as an example, therefore such as is more appropriate.

Hope this explanation helps
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Re: [#permalink] New post 04 Nov 2011, 03:10
ashkg wrote:
1:05 , E is my ans.

Here like is used as a conjunction. This is not preferred/correct usage of like.
I have copied this from a website :

Here is the rule:

Always use "like" as a preposition, never as a subordinating conjunction.

Historically, "like" has often been used as a subordinating conjunction, but in formal modern usage it is considered a definite no-no. The use of "like" as a conjunction had pretty nearly disappeared among the educated public, until a famous cigarette ad declared, "Winston tastes good like a cigarette should!"
The media have so popularized this once forbidden usage that one now hears it (and reads it) almost everywhere. But although it has become generally accepted in colloquial speech and informal writing, it is still considered questionable in formal writing. Anyone who wishes to be taken seriously as a writer needs to be very careful about unnecessarily violating this particular shibboleth, because it is seen by most teachers and editors not only as an error, but as another one of those really big errors.


Here are some examples of "like" used as a subordinating conjunction, along with corrected versions of the sentences.


EXAMPLES:


~My face felt like it had been set on fire.
My face felt as if it had been set on fire.
My face felt as though it had been set on fire.

~In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material like the teachers in high school do.
In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material, as the teachers in high school do
In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material the way the teachers in high school do.

~When I was a freshman I studied like my life depended on it.
When I was a freshman I studied as if my life depended on it.
When I was a freshman I studied as though my life depended on it.

~Some people with only a modest income try to live like they were millionaires.
Some people with only a modest income try to live as if they were millionaires.
Some people with only a modest income try to live as though they were millionaires.

The same goes for using "like" as a conjunction. It has a respectable history of being used as a conjunction, and it is commonly used that way in informal speech and writing today. But it is not commonly used that way in the formal writing of educated people, and so I will not risk my reputation for it. The fact is, it is quite simple to avoid using "like" as a conjunction, just as it is to avoid comma splices.


HTH


greate explaination.....

I am not sure why D is wrong and E is right....

why "who" in D is wrong
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Re: [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2013, 00:57
gmataquaguy wrote:
I recognize that this is a "comparison" type of question. However what i'm not sure of is why AC "B" is wrong.

If "as" is followed by a clause then the usage of "as" is correct
If "like" is followed by a phrase then the usage of "like" is correct.

To me, both B and E seem to be using "like/as" correctly in their respective choices. So i dont know why B is wrong. Is it because of "parallelism".

AC E compares "the speed up" of the buildup/drop with "the speed" of the ice skater?

In AC B, "speed" is used as a noun in the latter portion of the sentence but in the former portion "speed" is being used as a verb. Is that why B is wrong?

Could someone verify why B is wrong, in light of the fact that it uses "like" appropriately from a grammer perspective?


even though this is a old post, i will like to answer why B is wrong.
the non underline part in the sentence is a clause stating that build up of ice and drop in water levels speed up the earth's rotation. in option B the clause is compared with a phrase. This violates parallelism.

in nut shell, intended meaning of the sentence is- build up of ice and drop in water levels speed up the earth's rotation as a spinning skaters do. this is corrected in option E. hence option E is correct
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Re:   [#permalink] 12 Aug 2013, 00:57
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