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Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 06:00
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Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.

A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
B. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century did philosophers question the view of him as a teacher of evil.
C. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, in France and England particularly, considered Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
D. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince to be a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned.
E. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century was the view of him as a teacher of evil questioned.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 06:00
Really need a better explanation for this
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 07:55
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Please ponder whether A is //. The first part is active and the second part is passive. On the contrary, E is better balanced with both the first and second parts being // with passive voices.
You might note choices A through D are parallelly discordant.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 08:07
jitbec wrote:
Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.

A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.


"particularly in France and England" correctly modifies philosophers right before the comma.
"regarded..as" is the correct idiom: Regarded to be, considered to be OR considered as are all not preferred.

Only concern is the following:
the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned
It means that the "view of etc.." was questioned.
Also, how can view be a teacher(view of Machiavelli as a teacher of etc..)
"Machiavelli can be a teacher."
"View can remotely be a teaching Or perception"

Something just doesn't fit in.

Other options have idiomatic errors as I have pointed out.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 09:28
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Correct Answer: A
Explanation:
Note the idioms ‘regarded as something’ and ‘consider something’. In other words we don’t put ‘to be’ after regard or consider, and neither do we put ‘as’ after consider. This information helps us to eliminate C and D. next we turn our attention to word order. The order in B and E suggests that the ‘precepts’ were by the moralist philosophers. And so we are left with A. Also note that
the use of ‘him’ in B and E is inappropriate as we haven’t previously mentioned Machiavelli (Machiavelli’s The Prince is not the same as Machiavelli!) Note that the correct answer includes the passive voice ‘was questioned by’, and so, although the active voice is usually better than the passive, there are some cases where passives are found in correct answers.

This was the explanation .. quite strange if I can say so
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 09:30
Hi fluke,
Please let us know if the explanation given for E not being right is valid
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 09:41
jitbec wrote:
Hi fluke,
Please let us know if the explanation given for E not being right is valid


Yes, that's correct. It is not a hard and fast rule, but it is indeed given due consideration.

Machiavelli's: is possessive. So, only the possessive pronoun "his" can replace it, not him, which is objective.
Also, Machiavelli's The Prince is the noun. "him" can't refer to a book, art, non-human nouns.

"A" seems correct, except the minor glitch that I mentioned in my earlier post and that I'm doubtful about.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 09:50
Ok got it. One more follow up question. I got tripped on the parallism . In A both active voice and passive voice are used . Is it valid in parallel constructions?
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2011, 10:35
jitbec wrote:
Ok got it. One more follow up question. I got tripped on the parallism . In A both active voice and passive voice are used . Is it valid in parallel constructions?


I know it's bit awkward, but we don't have a better choice. I don't know any definite rule to rule this option out just on the basis of its passiveness, but given a choice, I'd prefer active. This question is not from official GMAT source and I would not waste too much of my time on this.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 14 Sep 2011, 17:48
I fell for C...but I see why A is correct.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 24 Sep 2011, 09:05
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Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.

A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers. CORRECT!
B. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century did philosophers question the view of him as a teacher of evil.
C. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, in France and England particularly, considered Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
D. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince to be a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned.
E. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century was the view of him as a teacher of evil questioned.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2011, 01:47
jitbec wrote:
Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.

A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
B. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century did philosophers question the view of him as a teacher of evil.
C. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, in France and England particularly, considered Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
D. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince to be a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned.
E. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century was the view of him as a teacher of evil questioned.


I went with A
Good observation by LalaB
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2011, 03:30
+1 A

B is using passive voice so out of the options
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2011, 04:26
I also got trapped by E but now I know why A is correct :)
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Oct 2011, 01:50
jitbec wrote:
Correct Answer: A
Explanation:
Note the idioms ‘regarded as something’ and ‘consider something’. In other words we don’t put ‘to be’ after regard or consider, and neither do we put ‘as’ after consider. This information helps us to eliminate C and D. next we turn our attention to word order. The order in B and E suggests that the ‘precepts’ were by the moralist philosophers. And so we are left with A. Also note that
the use of ‘him’ in B and E is inappropriate as we haven’t previously mentioned Machiavelli (Machiavelli’s The Prince is not the same as Machiavelli!) Note that the correct answer includes the passive voice ‘was questioned by’, and so, although the active voice is usually better than the passive, there are some cases where passives are found in correct answers.

This was the explanation .. quite strange if I can say so


Yes, this is a good explanation..I had picked B because I ignored the use of him and the second half of A was passive. But now I can see why A is correct. We got to choose the best option :)
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 13 Oct 2011, 03:40
I was torn between A and E. Since the "Him" in statement E has no antecedent... it is also wrong.
+1 for A
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 14 Oct 2011, 14:57
Definitely A... took awhile to break them all apart... but no doubt
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers [#permalink] New post 14 Oct 2011, 15:10
Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.

A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
ACTIVE VOICE philosophers regarded... opposed to regarded by philosophers
IDIOMATIC regarded as
Machiavelli, referenced for first time, is teacher of evil

B. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century did philosophers question the view of him as a teacher of evil.
HIM has no noun... 'possessive poision'. 'Machiavelli's' cannot be the noun referenced by HIM.
C. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, in France and England particularly, considered Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
CONSIDERED TO BE is correct idiom
D. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince to be a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned.
REGARDED AS is correct idiom
E. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century was the view of him as a teacher of evil questioned.
HIM has no noun... 'possessive poision'. 'Machiavelli's' cannot be the noun referenced by HIM.

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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2012, 22:55
Chose E but understand why it is A.Good question and good explanation.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in [#permalink] New post 13 Jan 2012, 07:39
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Hi,

Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.

Image

POE:

A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.: Correct.
1. This choice used correct idioms “regarded as”.
2. PS: An entity written in active voice can very well be parallel to the entity written in passive voice. The entities must be parallel to the extent that they keeping the logical meaning of the sentence intact and by maintaining the grammar structure to do so. Refer to OG 12#36.
3. (This is for fluke) For better understanding, let us rewrite the latter half of the sentence as: …, and the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil was not questioned by philosophers until the 17th Century. This sentence is grammatically sound. The syntax has been changed a bit in the original sentence for stylistic reason.

B. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century did philosophers question the view of him as a teacher of evil.: Incorrect.
1. Reference of “him” is not correct in this choice. Pronouns can only refer to nouns and other pronouns. In this choice, “him” cannot refer to “Machiavelli’s” because it is neither noun nor a pronoun. Used in possessive form, this word acts like an adjective modifying “The Prince”. It shows that “The Prince” was written by Machiavelli.

C. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, in France and England particularly, considered Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.: Incorrect.
1. Use of “as” after considered” is unidiomatic.

D. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince to be a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned.: Incorrect.
1. Use of “to be” is unidiomatic after “regarded”.
2. “philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil” is absolutely ungrammatical.

E. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century was the view of him as a teacher of evil questioned. Incorrect.
1. Same pronoun reference error as in choice B.

Image

1. Entities in a parallel list must be grammatically parallel to the extent that they maintain the logical meaning of the sentence.
2. We must use idiomatic expressions.
3. Pronouns can only refer to nouns and other pronouns.

The concepts tested in this sentence have been covered in e-gmat concepts:
1. Level 1 – Pronouns (This concept features in ‘Level 1 Preview Concepts’ that is available in Free Trail,. Just register and learn)
2. Level 1– Parallelism – Identify & Correct
3. Level 1 – Parallelism – Helpful Tips

Hope this helps.
Shraddha

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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in   [#permalink] 13 Jan 2012, 07:39
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