Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 15 Sep 2014, 23:57

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Economist.com and IMF sentences

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
CEO
CEO
avatar
Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 3470
Followers: 60

Kudos [?]: 668 [0], given: 781

Economist.com and IMF sentences [#permalink] New post 30 Nov 2003, 16:42
this is a sentence on housing from economist.com

To argue that low nominal interest rates make buying a home cheaper is like arguing that a car loan paid off over four years is cheaper than one repaid over two years.


do you think the use of "like" is ok here... i think "similar to" will be

better here..

this is a sentence from an IMF report...

Short-term real interest rates declined more quickly and by larger amounts than usual in the United States and, to a lesser extent,
Canada

do you think that the comparison is ok here..

do we need than " is" usual instead of than usual.

thanks
praetorian
Kaplan GMAT Prep Discount CodesKnewton GMAT Discount CodesVeritas Prep GMAT Discount Codes
GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2003
Posts: 771
Location: New York NY 10024
Schools: Haas, MFE; Anderson, MBA; USC, MSEE
Followers: 9

Kudos [?]: 31 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Economist.com and IMF sentences [#permalink] New post 30 Nov 2003, 19:23
praetorian123 wrote:
this is a sentence on housing from economist.com

To argue that low nominal interest rates make buying a home cheaper is like arguing that a car loan paid off over four years is cheaper than one repaid over two years.


do you think the use of "like" is ok here... i think "similar to" will be

better here..

this is a sentence from an IMF report...

Short-term real interest rates declined more quickly and by larger amounts than usual in the United States and, to a lesser extent,
Canada

do you think that the comparison is ok here..

do we need than " is" usual instead of than usual.

thanks
praetorian


1) I don't think "like" and "similar to" are interchangable. More analogous comparisons such as this one, IMO "like" should be used when the analogy in strong, and "similar to" when it is not so strong. IMO, something can be "similar to" but "unlike" something else.

As a aside, IMO the statement quoted is stupid whether one uses "llike" or "similar to". A loan with a lower nominal rate is certainly "cheaper" than a loan with a higher rate all else being equal. However, extending the payments period, all else being equal, while certainly reducing the payments, may or may not reduce the cost of the loan (depends on lots of stuff like inflation, etc.). These are NOT comparible and hence, IMO, the sentence is dumb.

2) IMO, the two are "mostly" interchangeable, although i would tend to use "more than usual" when comparing "action" and "more than is usual" when comparising a quantity or extent. Having said that, "is usual" seems to be better is followed by a prepositional phrase.

It rained more than usual last week.
It rained more than is usual for this time of year.
The rain created more havoc than is usual for this time of year.
_________________

Best,

AkamaiBrah
Former Senior Instructor, Manhattan GMAT and VeritasPrep
Vice President, Midtown NYC Investment Bank, Structured Finance IT
MFE, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley, Class of 2005
MBA, Anderson School of Management, UCLA, Class of 1993

CEO
CEO
avatar
Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 3470
Followers: 60

Kudos [?]: 668 [0], given: 781

Re: Economist.com and IMF sentences [#permalink] New post 30 Nov 2003, 19:53
AkamaiBrah wrote:
praetorian123 wrote:
this is a sentence on housing from economist.com

To argue that low nominal interest rates make buying a home cheaper is like arguing that a car loan paid off over four years is cheaper than one repaid over two years.


do you think the use of "like" is ok here... i think "similar to" will be

better here..

this is a sentence from an IMF report...

Short-term real interest rates declined more quickly and by larger amounts than usual in the United States and, to a lesser extent,
Canada

do you think that the comparison is ok here..

do we need than " is" usual instead of than usual.

thanks
praetorian


1) I don't think "like" and "similar to" are interchangable. More analogous comparisons such as this one, IMO "like" should be used when the analogy in strong, and "similar to" when it is not so strong. IMO, something can be "similar to" but "unlike" something else.

As a aside, IMO the statement quoted is stupid whether one uses "llike" or "similar to". A loan with a lower nominal rate is certainly "cheaper" than a loan with a higher rate all else being equal. However, extending the payments period, all else being equal, while certainly reducing the payments, may or may not reduce the cost of the loan (depends on lots of stuff like inflation, etc.). These are NOT comparible and hence, IMO, the sentence is dumb.

2) IMO, the two are "mostly" interchangeable, although i would tend to use "more than usual" when comparing "action" and "more than is usual" when comparising a quantity or extent. Having said that, "is usual" seems to be better is followed by a prepositional phrase.

It rained more than usual last week.
It rained more than is usual for this time of year.
The rain created more havoc than is usual for this time of year.


Thanks, brilliant, cogent and to the point as always. :)

The sentence from economist is from an article related to housing and the myths related to buying them.. and one of the myths was the above sentence..Probably, the article needs to be read in context.

thanks
praetorian
Re: Economist.com and IMF sentences   [#permalink] 30 Nov 2003, 19:53
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
4 For more than five decades, the IMF has been implementing mattce 3 14 Jul 2013, 23:14
Sentence Diagramming for Sentence Correction rampa 1 24 Oct 2011, 01:11
Best Route to lan into United Nations, IMF, World Bank ? yourstruly 2 08 Apr 2010, 06:58
Economist.com Rankings? kryzak 9 15 Oct 2009, 10:26
IMF says world coming out of recession trader1 1 09 Jul 2009, 04:57
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Economist.com and IMF sentences

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.