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Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ...

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Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ... [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2009, 08:05
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Re: Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ... [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2009, 12:36
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Since the sentence is comparing the rising of employment costs, you need "they did" in the comparison. If it were just employment costs, then you could use "lower than" ..
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Re: Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ... [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2009, 05:46
badgerboy wrote:
Since the sentence is comparing the rising of employment costs, you need "they did" in the comparison. If it were just employment costs, then you could use "lower than" ..


Why is less than considered. Less is used for uncountable words right? Lower is used for countable. Rising costs will be a number. And hence countable so shouldnt it be lower than they were? Please explain.. why each answer is wrong.
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Re: Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ... [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2009, 07:03
I dont think Employments costs is countable here but still not sure
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Re: Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2009, 11:32
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Here 'less" is modifying 'rose' and not employment costs.because costs have risen by 2.8 %.so costs can not be lower

this eliminates D and E.

B is wrong because of It


C is wrong because less than they were.here were is modifying employment costs

which is wrong.


So A is the right answer.
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Re: Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ... [#permalink] New post 28 Jun 2010, 10:23
Hi,
As explained by hrish88, 'less' modifies rose, but how is the subject plural?
In option A, we are using 'less than they' which means 'rose' should be a plural subject.
If subject is singular, then we should use 'it' instead.
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Re: Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ... [#permalink] New post 17 Jul 2010, 00:29
Can you count years? I can count my birthday LOL

But in grammar "25 years" is uncountable. e.g Less than 35 years after the release of African honeybees outside Sao Paulo, Brazil, their descendants, had migrated as far north as southern Texas.

Similarly "1000 dollars" is uncountable. I have [less / fewer] than 1000 dollars ----> less

"10 hours" are uncountable

Money is uncountable e.g. How ......... money do you have? ----> much

Hope that answers this question!
RaviChandra wrote:
I dont think Employments costs is countable here but still not sure

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Re: Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ... [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2012, 06:13
Although I don't think it is the relevant issue in this one, "employment costs" might be either countable or uncountable, depending on the context. You could count the various components (employment costs = hiring + training + salary + benefits + etc.). On the other hand, you could lump all of these costs into one amount, which would be uncountable.

Uncountable is probably the intended meaning here, as it says the costs "rose" not "increased in number."

Either "less" or "lower" could work with an uncountable quantity, so what do we really need to know about these words?
--"less" is a comparative that means "smaller in size, amount, degree, etc."
--"lower" is a comparative that is the opposite of higher.

I think the relevant amount is not the "employment costs" but the percent by which the costs rose. I think "less than" more clearly conveys the idea that employment costs rose 2.8% in the year ending in September, while employment costs rose <2.8% in the year ending in June.

If you wanted to use "lower than" correctly, you would need a noun in the second part of the comparison (e.g. "2.8% is lower than the percent for last quarter). Both (D) and (E) can be eliminated on this basis. (D) has no noun in the second part of the comparison. (E) has "they" = costs, which is the wrong noun, in the second part of the comparison.
Re: Employment costs rose 2.8 percent in the 12 months ...   [#permalink] 30 Apr 2012, 06:13
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