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Enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high in

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Enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high in [#permalink] New post 15 Oct 2003, 01:48
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

50% (02:01) correct 50% (00:41) wrong based on 7 sessions
5.
Enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high in a strong economy and much lower during weak economic times. How individuals view the likelihood of future job availability, therefore, affects people's willingness to pass up immediate their current employment opportunities in order to invest in career-related training. The argument above assumes that:

A) those who enroll in computer training schools during a strong economy help increase the economy's strength.
B) computer training programs admit fewer students during recessions.
C) perceptions of the likelihood of job availability are related to the state of the economy.
D) the perceived likelihood of job availability has decreased in recent years.
E) all those who avoid computer training school during an economic slump do so because of the perceived lack of future jobs.





6. In Los Angeles, a political candidate who buys saturation TV advertising will get maximum name recognition. The statement above logically conveys which of the following?

A) TV advertising is the most important factor in political campaigns in Los Angeles.
B) Maximum name recognition in Los Angeles will help a candidate to win a higher percentage of votes cast in the city.
C) Saturation TV advertising reaches every demographically distinct sector of the voting population of Los Angeles.
D) For maximum name recognition a candidate need not spend on media channels other than TV advertising.
E) A candidate's record of achievement in the Los Angeles area will do little to affect his or her name recognition there.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2003, 11:10
5. C

On questions #5, answer E is too extreme. Whenever you see the word ALL, you have to be careful. Even if 1 person avoids computer training school during an economic slump for other reasons (e.g. they don't have money) than the assumption is invalid.

Remember, use the negation test for assumptions. If you negate answer E (Not all, but only some people avoid training because of a perceived lack of future jobs) the argument is still valid. If you negate answer C (Perceptions are not related to the economy) the argument doesn't work.

6. D
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2003, 19:32
[quote="hota"]5. C

On questions #5, answer E is too extreme. Whenever you see the word ALL, you have to be careful. Even if 1 person avoids computer training school during an economic slump for other reasons (e.g. they don't have money) than the assumption is invalid.

Remember, use the negation test for assumptions. If you negate answer E (Not all, but only some people avoid training because of a perceived lack of future jobs) the argument is still valid. If you negate answer C (Perceptions are not related to the economy) the argument doesn't work.

>>>

To add to what hota explained, i feel the conclusion here is that the future job opportunities affect the willingness of people to invest in "career related training"...which not neccessarily means "computer training" only....hence i would go for choice C rather than E.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2003, 01:41
(C) In this question we have to find what assumption underlies this argument. The argument involves a question of cause and effect. Since enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high when the economy is strong and low when it is weak, the reason must be, according to the author, a matter of people's perceptions of job availability. Sounds reasonable, but do all the terms match up with those in this conclusion? We know from the question stem that they do not. What's missing? Well, the evidence pertains to the state of the economy. But the conclusion strays into the area of psychology--people's perceptions. Are these the same things? The author treats them as such by arguing from evidence regarding the state of the economy to a conclusion based on people's perceptions of the economy. The author takes the relationship between these for granted, but technically, in order for the argument to work, this must be established. (C) is this basic assumption.


(D) An L.A. political candidate who buys saturation TV advertising will get maximum name recognition. In other words, such advertising is sufficient for maximum name recognition. If so, then it must be true that, as (D) says, a candidate can get such recognition without spending on other forms of media.


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Re: Enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high in [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2011, 12:43
What are OA's
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Re: Enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high in [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2011, 04:00
IMO-

Quest 5- C
Question 6- A or D.

Can someone elobrate why its D and not A?
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Re: Enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high in [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2011, 20:25
E and E
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Re: Enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high in [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2011, 04:42
5.c
6.d
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Re: Enrollment in computer training programs tends to be high in   [#permalink] 29 Nov 2011, 04:42
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