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Errors in pronouns

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Errors in pronouns [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2014, 08:08
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There are various kinds of mistakes test-takers tend to do in the verbal part of the GMAT. Some of them are small or casual or careless while others tend to be more advanced. Careless mistakes occur when one is quite thorough with his basics but still is not wakeful or hasty. The other more serious mistakes occur because one just doesn’t have the basic knowledge such as grammar or their home-work is poor. Whatever the type or level of mistakes, the outcome is fatal and the experience frustrating. Can we take guard at this situation?
There is no denying that, if one is not aware of basic grammar, then there is no point in taking GMAT. Such items as sentence structure, parts of speech, differential use subject and object pronouns etc are barest minimum requirements. People who cannot pass them cannot get past 500 levels.
Advance levels include long sentences using modifiers, participles used as modifiers, parallel structures, number of collective nouns, tricky comparisons, critical mission modifiers etc. and lastly we also have the question of meaning based questions, which by a small twist of a word or a phrase tend to hoodwink the test-taker. Of course, gmatclub forum’s thread on the biggest mistakes gives a fairly profuse account of the errors; to add to that, we will be also updating the file with more such mistakes
You can now find an article on the mistakes committed on the topic of the number agreement between the subject and verb, involving Sanam pronouns in various types of usage as well as one of the constructions
So next time when you see a Sanam Pronoun, don’t break you head. (Per courtesy of MGMAT)

Some sentences that contain prepositions often pose problems while deciding the sub-verb agreements.

Look at the following examples

1. One of the students has scored centum in Maths.

2. Here the verb is in singular’ has scored, because we assume tht the subject is the singular ‘one’ ignoring the preposition and the subsequent plural noun as middle men... The structure hers is described as

(One) Singular Noun+ (of) preposition+ (the students) plural noun + (has scored) singular verb


3. One of the students who have scored centum in Maths is jumping

The structure here is described as

(one) Singular Noun+(of) preposition+( the students ) plural noun + who (relative pronoun)+ have scored ( plural verb of the sub clause ) + is jumping ( singular verb for the original subject one )

Here the relative pronoun who sticks to the touch rule, modifies the plural noun students, and takes on the plural characteristics. Hence we use a plural verb ‘have scored ‘for the subordinate clause.

In all such cases, the contextual meaning decides the nature and number of the verb.

To quote Ron (http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/pos ... tml#p48403)

In general, the rules given in the SC guide for "sanam (some, any,none,all,and many) pronouns are much too inflexible; we are going to edit that information in the next edition.
or, we may just remove the information entirely, because it has so far been completely irrelevant to the test.
* total number of times "any" is tested in og12: zero
* total number of times "any" is tested in 2nd ed verbal supplement: zero
* total number of times "any" is tested in the GMATPrep SC's of the last three years: zero

the same goes for "none", whose only appearance in the official guides is in a non-underlined part (in problem 22). incidentally, that one appearance also violates the "sanam" rule (in that example, none + of + plural is singular, not plural).

... so these pronouns aren't worth worrying about. their usage is hotly contested among experts on the English language, so there's no way they are going to be tested (thus explaining their very conspicuous absence from the official SC problems -- these are all very common words, so it's clear that they have been omitted on purpose.)

GMAT examples

In good years, the patchwork of green fields that surround the San Joaquin Valley town bustles with farm workers, many of them in the area just for the season.

A) surround the San Joaquin Valley town bustles with farm workers, many of them

B) surrounds the San Joaquin Valley town bustles with farm workers, many of whom are

C) surround the San Joaquin Valley town bustles with farm workers, many of who are

D) surround the San Joaquin Valley town bustle with farm workers, many of which

E) surrounds the San Joaquin Valley town bustles with farm workers, many are

Ans B

2. Minnesota is the only one of the contiguous forty-eight states that still has a sizable wolf population, and where this predator remains the archenemy of cattle and sheep.

(A) that still has a sizable wolf population, and where
(B) that still has a sizable wolf population, where
(C) that still has a sizable population of wolves, and where
(D) where the population of wolves is still sizable;
(E) where there is still a sizable population of wolves and where
Ans E
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Errors in pronouns   [#permalink] 09 Feb 2014, 08:08
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