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Even if a crime that has been committed by computer is

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Even if a crime that has been committed by computer is [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2010, 10:34
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A
B
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D
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Even if a crime that has been committed by computer is discovered and reported, the odds of being both arrested and convicted greatly favor the criminal.
Each of the following, if true, supports the claim above EXCEPT:
(A) The preparation of computer-fraud cases takes much more time than is required for average fraud cases, and the productivity of prosecutors is evaluated by the number of good cases made.
(B) In most police departments, officers are rotated through different assignments every two or three years, a shorter time than it takes to become proficient as a computer-crime investigator.
(C) The priorities of local police departments, under whose jurisdiction most computer crime falls, are weighted toward visible street crime that communities perceive as threatening.
(D) Computer criminals have rarely been sentenced to serve time in prison, because prisons are overcrowded with violent criminals and drug offenders.
(E) The many police officers who are untrained in computers often inadvertently destroy the physical evidence of computer crime.
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2010, 10:48
angel2009 wrote:
Even if a crime that has been committed by computer is discovered and reported, the odds of being both arrested and convicted greatly favor the criminal.
Each of the following, if true, supports the claim above EXCEPT:
(A) The preparation of computer-fraud cases takes much more time than is required for average fraud cases, and the productivity of prosecutors is evaluated by the number of good cases made.
(B) In most police departments, officers are rotated through different assignments every two or three years, a shorter time than it takes to become proficient as a computer-crime investigator.
(C) The priorities of local police departments, under whose jurisdiction most computer crime falls, are weighted toward visible street crime that communities perceive as threatening.
(D) Computer criminals have rarely been sentenced to serve time in prison, because prisons are overcrowded with violent criminals and drug offenders.
(E) The many police officers who are untrained in computers often inadvertently destroy the physical evidence of computer crime.


IMHO A.
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2010, 11:38
IMO A
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2010, 21:27
But OA is not A
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2010, 22:10
angel2009 wrote:
Even if a crime that has been committed by computer is discovered and reported, the odds of being both arrested and convicted greatly favor the criminal.
Each of the following, if true, supports the claim above EXCEPT:
(A) The preparation of computer-fraud cases takes much more time than is required for average fraud cases, and the productivity of prosecutors is evaluated by the number of good cases made.
(B) In most police departments, officers are rotated through different assignments every two or three years, a shorter time than it takes to become proficient as a computer-crime investigator.
(C) The priorities of local police departments, under whose jurisdiction most computer crime falls, are weighted toward visible street crime that communities perceive as threatening.
(D) Computer criminals have rarely been sentenced to serve time in prison, because prisons are overcrowded with violent criminals and drug offenders.
(E) The many police officers who are untrained in computers often inadvertently destroy the physical evidence of computer crime.


B,C,E support the claim that the computer criminals' getting arrested and convicted will be less and favors the criminal

Defintely between A and D.

A - says case takes longer time than the average. number of cases made would defintely effect as these take longer and prosecutors might not want to take the case seriously and gives defendent the advantage.
D - talks about jail time. but doesnt say about conviction - may be they just need to pay a huge amount - but still they are convicted.

D
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 27 Feb 2010, 09:18
OA D, I still inclined towards A. Probably I've missed lots of CR nowadays :-(
But my logic is that
Quote:
the odds of being both arrested and convicted greatly favor the criminal.
Each of the following, if true, supports the claim above EXCEPT:

Now according to me
Quote:
Computer criminals have rarely been sentenced to serve time in prison, because prisons are overcrowded with violent criminals and drug offenders.
-- now i think its a favor to the computer frauds and hence A is better
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 05 Mar 2010, 06:18
can anyone give another try to explain why D?
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 05 Mar 2010, 09:46
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I will try to explain why it is D.

D is the only answer that does not effect the odds of being both arrested and convicted.

Answer A effects the odds of being convicted by showing that computer fraud cases needs more time than average fraud cases. This somewhat supports the passage.

Answer D does not effect the odd of being arrested and convicted. This statement only shows what usually happens to convicted computer criminals.

I hope that helps.
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2010, 12:23
Hey All,

Plenty of good discussion going on here, and I think Ekin really nailed it at the end. I just wanted to pop in here (taking all the credit), and make sure everybody learns the lesson from this question. Whenever you start thinking that there's some kind of subtle gradations of meaning going on (and you're really torn between a couple of answer choices), take another look at the EXACT words in the premise, and the EXACT words in the conclusion. Odds are they differ.

In this case, we don't have a premise in the argument, because the premises are the answer choices themselves. Notice how we're asked to support THE CLAIM in this question, which means we're going to stay really close to what's written.

Then, as Ekin says, answer choice A, for all it's weirdness, directly relates to arrests (because somebody has to make the case before anyone will be arrested), where as D only relates to sentencing. Those little words will kill you if you're not careful. So be careful!

-t
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 03 Jun 2011, 00:23
Ekin4112 wrote:
I will try to explain why it is D.

D is the only answer that does not effect the odds of being both arrested and convicted.

Answer A effects the odds of being convicted by showing that computer fraud cases needs more time than average fraud cases. This somewhat supports the passage.

Answer D does not effect the odd of being arrested and convicted. This statement only shows what usually happens to convicted computer criminals.

I hope that helps.


I AGREE!
the argument says that even when the computer crimes are discovered and reported, the actions of arresting and convicting them have some obstacles that prevent these crimes from the touch of authorities. All choices A,B,C,E directly relate to some obstacles of arresting and convicting which all strengthen the argument.
(A): computer crimes are not likely be convicted
(B): computer crimes are not likely be arrested
(C): same as (B)
E): same as A
Only D talk about the sentencing activity which comes after crimes are arested and convicted.
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 03 Jun 2011, 00:28
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey All,

Plenty of good discussion going on here, and I think Ekin really nailed it at the end. I just wanted to pop in here (taking all the credit), and make sure everybody learns the lesson from this question. Whenever you start thinking that there's some kind of subtle gradations of meaning going on (and you're really torn between a couple of answer choices), take another look at the EXACT words in the premise, and the EXACT words in the conclusion. Odds are they differ.

In this case, we don't have a premise in the argument, because the premises are the answer choices themselves. Notice how we're asked to support THE CLAIM in this question, which means we're going to stay really close to what's written.

Then, as Ekin says, answer choice A, for all it's weirdness, directly relates to arrests (because somebody has to make the case before anyone will be arrested), where as D only relates to sentencing. Those little words will kill you if you're not careful. So be careful!

-t

thank you Tommy.i agree with you, all other choices are premises of the conclusion that "being arrested and convicted greatly favor the crimes", only D does not relate to the conclusion.
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Re: computer-fraud [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2011, 22:11
Good question indeed.Fell for A too.
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Re: Even if a crime that has been committed by computer is [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2013, 21:49
I totally fail to understand (A) :
(A) The preparation of computer-fraud cases takes much more time than is required for average fraud cases, and the productivity of prosecutors is evaluated by the number of good cases made.

And no one has come up with a reasonable explanation for it

Does taking time mean that arrest and conviction is not happening ? It may happen at a later time. If average cases take 6 months, this may take 2 years. Still, arrest and conviction does happen .
Also, another non-sensical statement that prosecutors are evaluated by the number of good cases made. Why would a delay make the prosecutors come up with a bad case ? They will come up with a good case at a later state.

All this says is that time taken is more. Arrest, conviction, and the ability of the prosecutors to make a good case will still happen
Re: Even if a crime that has been committed by computer is   [#permalink] 13 Jun 2013, 21:49
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