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Every one of the support staff and the Participants have to

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Every one of the support staff and the Participants have to [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2013, 19:00
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Every one of the support staff and the Participants have to compulsorily go through a full body search before they enter the competition area.

a) same as underlined

b) have to go thorough a compulsorily full body search before entering

c) have to compulsorily go through a full body search before he or she enters

d) has to compulsorily go through a full body search before entering

e) has to compulsorily go through a full body search before they enter

source - Aristotle SC grail

Please explain all the answer choices.

OA to follow soon... :?:
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by Zarrolou on 28 Apr 2013, 00:16, edited 3 times in total.
Added OA
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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2013, 19:46
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We have a compound subject here--"Every one of the support staff and the participants"--so we can eliminate "has" in D & E.

A & C have a problem with the placement of the modifier "compulsorily." Saying that they "have to compulsorily go" is redundant, since "compulsorily" refers to something you have to do. They don't have to "compulsorily go"; they just have to go. Note that C also incorrectly uses "he or she" to refer back to our plural subject.

I'm assuming that B was supposed to have the adjective form "compulsory." The adjective modifies the noun phrase "full body search." I still feel that this is redundant, but at least it doesn't incorrectly modify the action. With this correction, B is the best choice.

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2013, 20:15
DmitryFarber wrote:
We have a compound subject here--"Every one of the support staff and the participants"--so we can eliminate "has" in D & E.

A & C have a problem with the placement of the modifier "compulsorily." Saying that they "have to compulsorily go" is redundant, since "compulsorily" refers to something you have to do. They don't have to "compulsorily go"; they just have to go. Note that C also incorrectly uses "he or she" to refer back to our plural subject.

I'm assuming that B was supposed to have the adjective form "compulsory." The adjective modifies the noun phrase "full body search." I still feel that this is redundant, but at least it doesn't incorrectly modify the action. With this correction, B is the best choice.




The answer choices are correct.

OA is D and the explanation says that "Each" is singular that's why HAS....but I know the subject is Plural (Every one of xyz AND participants)...not sure what's going on here :(
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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2013, 21:02
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You know, it's funny--I didn't like that compound subject in B, and I originally figured the answer had to be D or E. If you read it the way the author seems to have intended, maybe it does work better: "Every one of (the support staff and the participants) has to . . ."

However, "has to compulsorily go" is absolutely wrong. I'd say we have a flawed question here. If B really says "compulsorily," there is no good answer.

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2013, 23:43
DmitryFarber wrote:
However, "has to compulsorily go" is absolutely wrong. I'd say we have a flawed question here. If B really says "compulsorily," there is no good answer.


@Dmitry.
I agree. Why do we need to say "has to compulsorily go". As far as I know, "has to" means "compulsory". I doubt that "compulsorily" is redundant? Could you confirm please. Thanks.

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 00:08
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Pqhai, when you say "I doubt that 'compulsorily' is redundant?" I'm assuming you mean that you think it is redundant. Watch your usage--"I doubt that X" means that you think X is unlikely to be true.

In any case, yes, as I stated in my initial response, "has to compulsorily go" is definitely redundant. Basically, the sentence is saying that people "have to have to go." I'm not even sure what that would mean . . .

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 05:22
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Im a bit unsure why is wrong to say: has to compulsory go............compulsory is also mandatory..

The subject has to go (mandatory or compulsory http://www.wordreference.com/definition/compulsory) towards something..........

For instance in my native language is perfectly fine from a boss or a director to say : You have to do this-----it is mandatory or compulsory

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 06:00
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Quote:
Every one of the support staff and the Participants have to compulsorily go through a full body search before they enter the competition area.

a) same as underlined
b) have to go thorough a compulsorily full body search before entering
c) have to compulsorily go through a full body search before he or she enters
d) has to compulsorily go through a full body search before entering
e) has to compulsorily go through a full body search before they enter

source - Aristotle SC grail


First, the subject of this sentence is "Every one", not "the support staff and the Participants". The "of the support staff and the Participants" is a prepositional modifier of the subject. Therefore, we choose "has" instead of "have". A, B, and C are out.

Second, one should almost always put Gerund after a preposition (here: "before"). (I don't know exceptions to the rule - if you do, please name them.) Therefore, we choose "entering" instead of "they enter". "they" is also incongruent with "has". E is out.

D is correct.

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 09:19
DmitryFarber wrote:
Pqhai, when you say "I doubt that 'compulsorily' is redundant?" I'm assuming you mean that you think it is redundant. Watch your usage--"I doubt that X" means that you think X is unlikely to be true.


Wow, thanks so much for correcting. Very good lesson :)

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 10:21
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HumptyDumpty wrote:
Quote:

Second, one should almost always put Gerund after a preposition (here: "before"). (I don't know exceptions to the rule - if you do, please name them.)


You're right that if we're going to have a verb after a preposition, we need to turn it into a gerund. For instance, we can't say "Wash your hands before eat" or "I am interested in to sign up." Those are terrible!

However, there is no rule that we can't have a clause after a preposition, as we see in E. A few examples:

I would like to talk to you before you leave. (Notice that if we used the gerund here--"before leaving"--it would change the meaning of the sentence by making *me* the one who's leaving.)
I'm not going to go to Mars until there is a way to get back home. (There is no way to express this with a gerund after the preposition.)

This kind of construction doesn't work with all prepositions--I can't think of a way to follow basic prepositions such as "in" or "of" with a clause (although they can of course be followed by a noun). However, when we're using a word like "before" to show the relationship between two events, a clause is often needed.

So we can't eliminate based on the use of a clause after a preposition, but E is still wrong because of the pronoun "they."

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 21:10
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Well: the following six words can act as both a sub-conjunction and a preposition. If it is a preposition, then a noun follows. If it is acting as sub-conjunction, an IC with a full-fledged verb follows. Those six words are

1. After 2 Before 3. Until 4 Since 5. For 6. As

Let us see each of them:

After: I slept after my dinner (preposition) – dinner is a noun; it can also be a gerund as in I slept after reading
I slept after I felt tired: here after is a sub-conjunction followed by a verbed clause.

Before: I jogged before my bath – preposition
I jogged before I took my bath – conjunction

As: I am correct in my duties as a father --- preposition
I am correct in my duties as a father is required to do - Conjunction

Since: I slept for a good time since your arrival - preposition
I slept for a long time , since you arrived very late

Until: I slept late until 9 AM – preposition
I slept late until you arrived – conjunction

For: I slept for 12 hours- preposition
I slept the whole day, for I felt tired. Conjunction ( for used in the meaning of because)

So we have to see, whether the said word is used as a preposition or a conjunction, before taking a blanket decision

E is still wrong in the given case for other reasons.

HTH

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 21:22
So let's put the rule together: Whenever a preposition is followed by verb, it has to take Gerund form. Right?

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 21:50
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@HumptyDumpty

Again, not so blanketely:

A word that is a preposition never is followed by a verb; As long as it is a preposition, it can only be followed by a noun or noun phrases. Some of these nouns may be gerunds. All gerunds are nouns in essence. But all nouns are not gerunds (gerunds are verb +ing forms, with the name ‘verbal’)

If a word is subordinate-conjunction, what follow will be only a clause, meaning, and a clause with a verb;
Any attempt to short - cut this compass will only land us in unintended muddle. .

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 22:00
daagh wrote:
@HumptyDumpty

Again, not so blanketely:

A word that is a preposition never is followed by a verb; As long as it is a preposition, it can only be followed by a noun or noun phrases. Some of these nouns may be gerunds. All gerunds are nouns in essence. But all nouns are not gerunds (gerunds are verb +ing forms, with the name ‘verbal’)


Well, that is the meaning of the rule. Gerund is a verb form which functions as a noun.

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 22:20
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Gerund is a present participle that functions as a noun. present participles are not verbs

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 22:30
I used the definition from Consice Oxford English Dictionary, OUP 2007. I am not a pro, therefore I always draw on official resources.

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2013, 22:37
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@Humpty Dumpty

Ok: I understand.

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2013, 09:28
I am not convinced with D . Still feel because of usage of and plural have needs to be used . Please can someone explain a little more why was A wrong .
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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2013, 09:37
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Again, I want to stress that *all* of the answer choices are wrong. This is not a valid SC problem. However, the intended meaning is apparently for the subject to be "Every one," with "of the support staff and the participants" serving as a modifier. Therefore the plural pronoun "they" is incorrect. I think the use of "the" before "participants" is awkward and creates some ambiguity about the subject, which is why I initially said that the subject is plural. It's pretty safe to say that you wouldn't see this on the GMAT.

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Re: Sub verb agreement [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2013, 09:41
got it!! thnks for the quick response .
Re: Sub verb agreement   [#permalink] 29 Apr 2013, 09:41
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