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Excavations of the Roman city of

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Excavations of the Roman city of [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2010, 01:11
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A
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E

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80% (01:42) correct 20% (02:07) wrong based on 10 sessions
Excavations of the Roman city of...

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[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2010, 09:00
E it is.

Ignore the out of scope options.

Then try putting the best contenders just before the conclusion. If the whole thing makes sense together then that is most probably the right choice.

There was not a common repertory of designs with which artisans who lived in various parts of Roman Empire were familiar. Hence the mosaics of Sepphoris were very likely created by travelling artisans from other parts of Roman empire.
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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2010, 09:37
i would go with E
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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2010, 10:03
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+1 for E

1. Type of stones used have nothing to do with who created the mosaics.
2. The species do not have to be native to one particular region for the mosaic to be created by travelling artisans.
3. The question is talking about another city's design being in the city of Sepphoris. Sepphoris design being outside of city of Sepphoris or not is irrelevant.
4. It's irrelevant whether the species are readily identifiable or not.
5. If there WAS a common repertory of designs, Sepphoris artisans could have designed the mosaic themselves based on the repertory. >> Answer
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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2010, 11:23
why not option C?

i think even C comes a bit close...
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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 21 Aug 2010, 03:08
That is my exact question too! C also comes close... If there is no other design in city of Sepphoris that is not in some other Roman city too, then that completely signifies that all the motif designs in Sepphoris must be created by artisans traveling from Roman cities. This assumption completely satisfies the condition that they are most likely to be created by traveling Roman Artisans.
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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 21 Aug 2010, 09:05
Negate C. The argument will not fall bcos it does not rests on that assumption. Its rests on the assumptions that the artisans who can paint are NOT familiar with ALL the mosaics.
The only thing which comes close is B. But it can't bcos it uses the word "native". The question exemplifies GMAT standard since all the other choices are far away from the correct answer.

jananijayakumar wrote:
That is my exact question too! C also comes close... If there is no other design in city of Sepphoris that is not in some other Roman city too, then that completely signifies that all the motif designs in Sepphoris must be created by artisans traveling from Roman cities. This assumption completely satisfies the condition that they are most likely to be created by traveling Roman Artisans.

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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 21 Aug 2010, 12:14
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Excavations of the Roman city of Sepphoris have uncovered numerous detailed mosaics depicting several readily identifiable animal species: a hare, a patridge, and various Mediterranean fish. Oddly, most of the species represented did not live in the Sepphoris region when these mosaics were created. Since identical motifs appear in mosaics found in other Roman cities, however, the mosaics of Sepphoris were very likely created by traveling artisans from some other part of the Roman empire.

Conclusion: The mosaics in Sepphoris were created by traveling artisans.

Premise: The mosaics include depictions of readily identifiable animals that did not live in Sepphoris.

Assumption: That only traveling artisans could have depicted the animals. That there was no way for local artisans to have depicted the animals.

Sometimes it can help to preface each answer choice with "The argument assumes that...":

A. The argument assumes that the Sepphoris mosaics are not composed exclusively of types of stones found naturally in the Sepphoris area. Out of scope. The argument is not concerned with the type of stones what were used.
B. The argument assumes that there is no single region to which all the species depicted in the Sepphoris mosaics are native. Incorrect. This answer choice addresses not the assumption but a premise: where the animals lived, which is a fact not in dispute.
C. The argument assumes that motifs appear in the Sepphoris mosaics that do not also appear in the mosaics of some other Roman city. Out of scope. The argument makes no assumptions about the mosaics of other cities; it is concerned only with artisans who traveled to other cities.
D. The argument assumes that all of the animal figures in the Sepphoris mosiacs are readily identifiable as representation of known species. Incorrect. The argument mentions only numerous species. Also, these numerous species are not an assumption but a premise, a fact not in dispute.
E. The argument assumes that there was not a common repertory of mosaic designs with which artisans who lived in various parts of the Roman empire were familiar. Correct. This is what the argument is assuming: that there was no other way for local artists to be aware of the animals depicted in the mosaics.

Also, answer choice E passes the negation test. Here's E negated:

There was a common repertory of mosaic designs with which artisans who lived in various parts of the Roman empire were familiar.

If there was a common repertory, then local artisans -- not traveling artisans -- could have depicted the animals, and the argument would fall apart. Thus, E is the assumption: the answer that must be true for the argument to work.

Hope this helps!

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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2012, 06:11
GMATGuruNY wrote:
Excavations of the Roman city of Sepphoris have uncovered numerous detailed mosaics depicting several readily identifiable animal species: a hare, a patridge, and various Mediterranean fish. Oddly, most of the species represented did not live in the Sepphoris region when these mosaics were created. Since identical motifs appear in mosaics found in other Roman cities, however, the mosaics of Sepphoris were very likely created by traveling artisans from some other part of the Roman empire.

Conclusion: The mosaics in Sepphoris were created by traveling artisans.

Premise: The mosaics include depictions of readily identifiable animals that did not live in Sepphoris.

Assumption: That only traveling artisans could have depicted the animals. That there was no way for local artisans to have depicted the animals.

Sometimes it can help to preface each answer choice with "The argument assumes that...":

A. The argument assumes that the Sepphoris mosaics are not composed exclusively of types of stones found naturally in the Sepphoris area. Out of scope. The argument is not concerned with the type of stones what were used.
B. The argument assumes that there is no single region to which all the species depicted in the Sepphoris mosaics are native. Incorrect. This answer choice addresses not the assumption but a premise: where the animals lived, which is a fact not in dispute.
C. The argument assumes that motifs appear in the Sepphoris mosaics that do not also appear in the mosaics of some other Roman city. Out of scope. The argument makes no assumptions about the mosaics of other cities; it is concerned only with artisans who traveled to other cities.
D. The argument assumes that all of the animal figures in the Sepphoris mosiacs are readily identifiable as representation of known species. Incorrect. The argument mentions only numerous species. Also, these numerous species are not an assumption but a premise, a fact not in dispute.
E. The argument assumes that there was not a common repertory of mosaic designs with which artisans who lived in various parts of the Roman empire were familiar. Correct. This is what the argument is assuming: that there was no other way for local artists to be aware of the animals depicted in the mosaics.

Also, answer choice E passes the negation test. Here's E negated:

There was a common repertory of mosaic designs with which artisans who lived in various parts of the Roman empire were familiar.

If there was a common repertory, then local artisans -- not traveling artisans -- could have depicted the animals, and the argument would fall apart. Thus, E is the assumption: the answer that must be true for the argument to work.

Hope this helps!

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what if you take C and combine it with the fact in the argument that most of the species represented did not live in the region when the mosaics were created. ??
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Re: Please answer [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2012, 06:28
thebigr002 wrote:
GMATGuruNY wrote:
Excavations of the Roman city of Sepphoris have uncovered numerous detailed mosaics depicting several readily identifiable animal species: a hare, a patridge, and various Mediterranean fish. Oddly, most of the species represented did not live in the Sepphoris region when these mosaics were created. Since identical motifs appear in mosaics found in other Roman cities, however, the mosaics of Sepphoris were very likely created by traveling artisans from some other part of the Roman empire.

Conclusion: The mosaics in Sepphoris were created by traveling artisans.

Premise: The mosaics include depictions of readily identifiable animals that did not live in Sepphoris.

Assumption: That only traveling artisans could have depicted the animals. That there was no way for local artisans to have depicted the animals.

Sometimes it can help to preface each answer choice with "The argument assumes that...":

A. The argument assumes that the Sepphoris mosaics are not composed exclusively of types of stones found naturally in the Sepphoris area. Out of scope. The argument is not concerned with the type of stones what were used.
B. The argument assumes that there is no single region to which all the species depicted in the Sepphoris mosaics are native. Incorrect. This answer choice addresses not the assumption but a premise: where the animals lived, which is a fact not in dispute.
C. The argument assumes that motifs appear in the Sepphoris mosaics that do not also appear in the mosaics of some other Roman city. Out of scope. The argument makes no assumptions about the mosaics of other cities; it is concerned only with artisans who traveled to other cities.
D. The argument assumes that all of the animal figures in the Sepphoris mosiacs are readily identifiable as representation of known species. Incorrect. The argument mentions only numerous species. Also, these numerous species are not an assumption but a premise, a fact not in dispute.
E. The argument assumes that there was not a common repertory of mosaic designs with which artisans who lived in various parts of the Roman empire were familiar. Correct. This is what the argument is assuming: that there was no other way for local artists to be aware of the animals depicted in the mosaics.

Also, answer choice E passes the negation test. Here's E negated:

There was a common repertory of mosaic designs with which artisans who lived in various parts of the Roman empire were familiar.

If there was a common repertory, then local artisans -- not traveling artisans -- could have depicted the animals, and the argument would fall apart. Thus, E is the assumption: the answer that must be true for the argument to work.

Hope this helps!

Mitch Hunt
GMAT tutor and instructor
New York, NY




what if you take C and combine it with the fact in the argument that most of the species represented did not live in the region when the mosaics were created. ??


Your question is valid, but it has nothing to do with the common repertory of mosaic designs.

(it mat be possible that those travelling artist had learnt it while travelling, and so have taught their children who are also learning it professionally in order to continue the art in generations,because there may not be any thing where those mosaic could have been recorded such as leaves,wooden planks etc...)

Hope this works !
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Re: Please answer   [#permalink] 20 Jul 2012, 06:28
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