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Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim

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Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim is not mere proverbial wisdom but a fact verified by statistics. In a recently concluded survey, only one-third of the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy.

Which one of the following, if true, most strongly supports the conclusion drawn from the survey results?

(A) The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
(B) Financial success was once thought to be necessary for happiness but is no longer considered a prerequisite for happiness.
(C) Many of the respondents who claimed not to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy five years ago.
(D) Many of the respondents who failed to report financial success were in fact financially successful.
(E) Most of the respondents who reported they were unhappy were in fact happy.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:11
boh,
really unsure bout this one.

I'd pick D, although the reasoning is equally plump as in E. D means, that there were actually more people who were financially successful, and therefore there is a posibility, that a lot more were happy than actually known...

Other answers are all kinda vague to me.
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:14
E)...
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:16
oh no...its A)...it supports the accuracy of the group...
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:19
christoph wrote:
oh no...its A)...


hahah f§$K... true A) clearly

d a m n sometimes takes a while entangle the gist... practise practise practise
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:22
It should be A.

if the respondents who reported financial success were in fact financially successful, then only the statement "Financial success does not guarantee happiness" is true and a fact verified by statistics otherwise not. so, to verify this fact the respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:31
Antmavel wrote:
Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim is not mere proverbial wisdom but a fact verified by statistics. In a recently concluded survey, only one-third of the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy.

Which one of the following, if true, most strongly supports the conclusion drawn from the survey results?

(A) The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
(B) Financial success was once thought to be necessary for happiness but is no longer considered a prerequisite for happiness.
(C) Many of the respondents who claimed not to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy five years ago.
(D) Many of the respondents who failed to report financial success were in fact financially successful.
(E) Most of the respondents who reported they were unhappy were in fact happy.


Well, guess that if you picked D at first , it means you understand that the group of respondents is a mix of " financial successful" and " not financial successful" ....this is wrong if we read it carefully...."who..." indicate that the group is a sheer one of "financial successful" people ...Thus, D can't be correct . It should be A.
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:33
laxieqv wrote:
Antmavel wrote:
Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim is not mere proverbial wisdom but a fact verified by statistics. In a recently concluded survey, only one-third of the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy.

Which one of the following, if true, most strongly supports the conclusion drawn from the survey results?

(A) The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
(B) Financial success was once thought to be necessary for happiness but is no longer considered a prerequisite for happiness.
(C) Many of the respondents who claimed not to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy five years ago.
(D) Many of the respondents who failed to report financial success were in fact financially successful.
(E) Most of the respondents who reported they were unhappy were in fact happy.


Well, guess that if you picked D at first , it means you understand that the group of respondents is a mix of " financial successful" and " not financial successful" ....this is wrong if we read it carefully...."who..." indicate that the group is a sheer one of "financial successful" people ...Thus, D can't be correct . It should be A.


TRUE!! ;) that was exactly what I was thinking! thx, gonna try to keep an eye on the detail
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:38
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I got A.

A. is assuming that the other 2 third who did not claim to have achieved financial success are happy or they are actually not financially successful.
either way if those who claimed to be financially successful, are actually successful, then it strengthens the conclusion.
B. is totally out of scope
C. those who are not financially successful were happy 5 years ago, does help us resolve anything.
D. Is a trap. if most people who failed to report financial success are in fact suceessful, there will be a lot of happy people who are financially successful.
so it weakens the conclusion.
E. also weakens the conclusion
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 07:56
I'll pick A.

No other answer can be acceptable.
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 09:44
I also got A since it bolster the claim.
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New post 08 Nov 2005, 18:22
no OE
but OA is A
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Re: Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim [#permalink]

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Re: Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2016, 02:23
Clearly , answer is ' A' as it strengthens that if 1/3 financial successful participants have asnwered that they are unhappy , then for the conclusion to be true most of the participants have to be financially successful otherwise conclusion will break.
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New post 09 Aug 2016, 05:51
I agree that option A is the best choice among the choices but rather than strengthening isn't it helping to evaluate the argument. Could someone please explain please. Thanks
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Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2016, 21:25
Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim is not mere proverbial wisdom but a fact verified by statistics. In a recently concluded survey, only one-third of the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy.

100 claimed to have financial success.
33 out of that are happy otherwise 66 are not happy.

what if that 66 percent are unhappy because it's in their nature regardless of their financial sucess, so that can weaken the argument and opp. of that strenthen.

Which one of the following, if true, most strongly supports the conclusion drawn from the survey results?

(A) The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
(B) Financial success was once thought to be necessary for happiness but is no longer considered a prerequisite for happiness.
(C) Many of the respondents who claimed not to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy five years ago. :- but we don't their financial condition 5 years ago so we don't know if strengthen or weaken.
(D) Many of the respondents who failed to report financial success were in fact financially successful.
(E) Most of the respondents who reported they were unhappy were in fact happy. :- it weakens the idea.

B- This means that there is a shift in tendency that how people perceive happiness. Today if they have considered financial happiness = happiness then this statistics would have been biased. but if you remove that condition than this is the actual result we get. it's like the reversing the situation we are analyzing. so I think it should be B.

while A is just of the restatement of the fact. The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful. How one see "financial success" is totally subjective. if one thinks money they achieved is sufficient, financial success it is. End of the story. How would you measure -for the most part, financially successful? Would you compare it to wealth of Bill gates' wealth.


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New post 09 Aug 2016, 21:29
anje29 wrote:
Clearly , answer is ' A' as it strengthens that if 1/3 financial successful participants have asnwered that they are unhappy , then for the conclusion to be true most of the participants have to be financially successful otherwise conclusion will break.


why do you need -most of the participants have to be financially successful, their financial success is not question mark. it's already been told that
the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success => we are already looking at the subset of people who have achieved financial success.
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New post 09 Aug 2016, 22:45
Antmavel wrote:
Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim is not mere proverbial wisdom but a fact verified by statistics. In a recently concluded survey, only one-third of the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy.

Which one of the following, if true, most strongly supports the conclusion drawn from the survey results?

(A) The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
(B) Financial success was once thought to be necessary for happiness but is no longer considered a prerequisite for happiness.
(C) Many of the respondents who claimed not to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy five years ago.
(D) Many of the respondents who failed to report financial success were in fact financially successful.
(E) Most of the respondents who reported they were unhappy were in fact happy.


Correct answer is A. C, D and E are straightaway out since we they cannot support the conclusion which are outside premise give.
B re-states the fact mentioned in the Premise. A shows that all the people were financially successful however only some of them showed happiness.
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New post 10 Aug 2016, 02:09
abrakadabra21 wrote:
anje29 wrote:
Clearly , answer is ' A' as it strengthens that if 1/3 financial successful participants have asnwered that they are unhappy , then for the conclusion to be true most of the participants have to be financially successful otherwise conclusion will break.


why do you need -most of the participants have to be financially successful, their financial success is not question mark. it's already been told that
the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success => we are already looking at the subset of people who have achieved financial success.


only one-third of the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy

'Claimed to achieve financial success' according to me is again subjective. Similar to what you have expressed in a above post.
For ex A person X can 'claim' 1000 dollars as financial success whereas another person y can 'claim' even 10000 dollars not a financial success..

Choice A says that whose who 'claimed' to be financially successful were indeed successful (as viewed from a third person). So in that sense I meant Choice A to be evaluative.

Am I going wrong in understanding this?
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Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim is not mere proverbial wisdom but a fact verified by statistics. In a recently concluded survey, only one-third of the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy.

Which one of the following, if true, most strongly supports the conclusion drawn from the survey results?

Background:- The old age proverb is you can't buy happiness. Meaning Money cannot buy happiness

Premise 1) Financial Success does not guarantee happiness
Premise 2) This is proved by statistical studies
Conclusion) In a survey only one-third (33%) of the respondent who CLAIMED to have achieved financial success said they were happy.


The conclusion is a very tricky one because it makes some test taker to think about the remaining two third 66% of people and this will make them to infer and assume things that are not explicitly mentioned in the argument. DON'T DO THAT. Remember we don't have to include them in our thought process. Since the argument draws conclusion about 33% of people so this is the subset that we will use to strengthen out conclusion.

Now what if these 33% happy people were actually utter failures in their life or only moderately successful but due to some misguided sense of prosperity/richness they thought they were financially successful. --> Then it would mean that they were happy but not really financially successful. Then the argument will fall apart. We have remove any doubt about their financial success and by doing so we will show that they were indeed successful and indeed happy.

What option does the trick
OPTION A
(A) The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
Meaning they were really successful and also happy.


(A) The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
CORRECT

(B) Financial success was once thought to be necessary for happiness but is no longer considered a prerequisite for happiness.
WRONG :-DEEP PHILOSOPHICAL INCORRECT ANSWER :) IRRELEVANT

(C) Many of the respondents who claimed not to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy five years ago.
WRONG:- Not successfull right now ---> happy five years ago--> currently happy or unhappy ???
The option prompts that they are unhappy .
argument is successfull ---> happy
Option is Not successfull---> not happy
Mistaken reversal.

(D) Many of the respondents who failed to report financial success were in fact financially successful.
WRONG:-Does not give us any idea about the sate of happiness of such participant and thus cannot be use to strengthen the conclusion.

(E) Most of the respondents who reported they were unhappy were in fact happy.
Wrong:- Does not give us the link between financial success and state of happiness/unhappiness of such participants. Cannot be used to strengthen the argument.


Antmavel wrote:
Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim is not mere proverbial wisdom but a fact verified by statistics. In a recently concluded survey, only one-third of the respondents who claimed to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy.

Which one of the following, if true, most strongly supports the conclusion drawn from the survey results?

(A) The respondents who reported financial success were, for the most part, financially successful.
(B) Financial success was once thought to be necessary for happiness but is no longer considered a prerequisite for happiness.
(C) Many of the respondents who claimed not to have achieved financial success reported that they were happy five years ago.
(D) Many of the respondents who failed to report financial success were in fact financially successful.
(E) Most of the respondents who reported they were unhappy were in fact happy.

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Financial success does not guarantee happiness. This claim   [#permalink] 10 Aug 2016, 05:39

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