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Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use

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Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2013, 16:50
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Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.

(A) is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is

(B) not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is

(C) is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet

(D) is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is

(E) is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet


could someone break down how they thought of this question? it's little difficult to believe it has been thought of like that
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2013, 10:57
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manimgoindowndown wrote:
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.
(A) is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(B) not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is
(C) is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet
(D) is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(E) is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet

I'm happy to help with this. :-) This is a great question --- MGMAT really writes good questions!

The basic issue in this one is --- where the common words fall when you have parallel elements in a "not only ... but also" structure. Here's a blog that addresses this issue:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/common-par ... orrection/

Consider the following abstract structure involving "not only ... but also" or any similar correlative structure.

blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

I am going to call the purple part "outside" the "not only ... but also" structure, and the green part "inside" the structure. The BIG IDEA is that any common word that applies to both the parallel terms inside the structure can appear
(a) one outside the structure
or
(b) twice inside the structure, once before each term

For example, this is legal:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

This is also legal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah

But this is illegal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also blah blah blah
and this is similarly illegal:
blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
Those have the common term once inside only. A favorite illegal pattern, very common the GMAT SC, is this:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
the good old "once outside, once inside" mistake --- they love this one!

In this MGMAT SC question, the simple word "is" the common word that applies to both parallel terms.
(A) correctly has the word appear once outside the "not only ... but also" structure --- this is correct.
(B) has the word "is" once inside, in front of the first term, omitted from the second term
(C) & (D) don't have the not only at all, just the but also --- the structure is incomplete
(E) ah, the classic "once outside, once inside" mistake

Here's another practice SC question exploring some of the same ideas:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3290
When you submit your answer to that question, the next page will have a full video explanation.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Mike :-)
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2013, 19:09
Took a little to understand but I think it's a GREAT way to think of idiomatic expressions (not only...but also) being thrown in with other modifiers. I actually found A awkward initially while reading the sentence and by process of elimination thought B was the best choice even though according to your rule and observation it is incorrect.

B also isn't a parallel construction like you observed.


As always thanks !
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2013, 21:19
mikemcgarry wrote:
manimgoindowndown wrote:
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.
(A) is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(B) not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is
(C) is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet
(D) is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(E) is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet

I'm happy to help with this. :-) This is a great question --- MGMAT really writes good questions!

The basic issue in this one is --- where the common words fall when you have parallel elements in a "not only ... but also" structure. Here's a blog that addresses this issue:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/common-par ... orrection/

Consider the following abstract structure involving "not only ... but also" or any similar correlative structure.

blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

I am going to call the purple part "outside" the "not only ... but also" structure, and the green part "inside" the structure. The BIG IDEA is that any common word that applies to both the parallel terms inside the structure can appear
(a) one outside the structure
or
(b) twice inside the structure, once before each term

For example, this is legal:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

This is also legal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah

But this is illegal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also blah blah blah
and this is similarly illegal:
blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
Those have the common term once inside only. A favorite illegal pattern, very common the GMAT SC, is this:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
the good old "once outside, once inside" mistake --- they love this one!

In this MGMAT SC question, the simple word "is" the common word that applies to both parallel terms.
(A) correctly has the word appear once outside the "not only ... but also" structure --- this is correct.
(B) has the word "is" once inside, in front of the first term, omitted from the second term
(C) & (D) don't have the not only at all, just the but also --- the structure is incomplete
(E) ah, the classic "once outside, once inside" mistake

Here's another practice SC question exploring some of the same ideas:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3290
When you submit your answer to that question, the next page will have a full video explanation.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Mike :-)


Mike, thank you for the grammar lesson. Could you also give some pointers to the "yet is..." usage? I guess the lack of a pronoun "it" bugs me. Thanks!
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2013, 21:29
stoy4o wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
manimgoindowndown wrote:
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.
(A) is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(B) not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is
(C) is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet
(D) is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(E) is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet

I'm happy to help with this. :-) This is a great question --- MGMAT really writes good questions!

The basic issue in this one is --- where the common words fall when you have parallel elements in a "not only ... but also" structure. Here's a blog that addresses this issue:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/common-par ... orrection/

Consider the following abstract structure involving "not only ... but also" or any similar correlative structure.

blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

I am going to call the purple part "outside" the "not only ... but also" structure, and the green part "inside" the structure. The BIG IDEA is that any common word that applies to both the parallel terms inside the structure can appear
(a) one outside the structure
or
(b) twice inside the structure, once before each term

For example, this is legal:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

This is also legal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah

But this is illegal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also blah blah blah
and this is similarly illegal:
blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
Those have the common term once inside only. A favorite illegal pattern, very common the GMAT SC, is this:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
the good old "once outside, once inside" mistake --- they love this one!

In this MGMAT SC question, the simple word "is" the common word that applies to both parallel terms.
(A) correctly has the word appear once outside the "not only ... but also" structure --- this is correct.
(B) has the word "is" once inside, in front of the first term, omitted from the second term
(C) & (D) don't have the not only at all, just the but also --- the structure is incomplete
(E) ah, the classic "once outside, once inside" mistake

Here's another practice SC question exploring some of the same ideas:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3290
When you submit your answer to that question, the next page will have a full video explanation.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Mike :-)


Mike, thank you for the grammar lesson. Could you also give some pointers to the "yet is..." usage? I guess the lack of a pronoun "it" bugs me. Thanks!



So 1. you check the idiomatic construction like Mike did 2. The parallelism with yet has to do with what is before and after it being the same since the 'common' or 'it' as mike said is outside of the conjunction.

It's just the same concept applied again. Do you understand it? Or am I wrong here Mike, and the 'common' can only apply to idioms?

Another reason why I would see no problem with just having is, in addition to the it already being stated is, what would that it be referring to? That would be ambiguous
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2013, 21:48
Quote:
So 1. you check the idiomatic construction like Mike did 2. The parallelism with yet has to do with what is before and after it being the same since the 'common' or 'it' as mike said is outside of the conjunction.

It's just the same concept applied again. Do you understand it? Or am I wrong here Mike, and the 'common' can only apply to idioms?

Another reason why I would see no problem with just having is, in addition to the it already being stated is, what would that it be referring to? That would be ambiguous


I see what you're saying and I may be wrong, but I don't think the same inside/outside common rule that Mike explained about the idiomatic expression applies here. Having "it" next to "yet" would refer to the same subject to which "IT is not only..." refers to (aka. "Trail" - the only subject). My only reasoning for why "yet is ..." is correct is that "yet it is..." makes the clause independent. In this case it is not gramatically correct to connect independent clauses with a comma.
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 01 Mar 2013, 02:14
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.

A is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is

B not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is. distorts parallelism in two places. 1: in Not only..but also . 2. It (<--Non parallel part in non-underline portion) it is...doesn't make sense

C is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet. distorts parallelism

D is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is. distorts parallelism

E is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet
distorts parallelism
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 01 Mar 2013, 10:46
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The golden rule to follow the correlative conjunction parallelism in such cases as --- (not only….. but also), (both ---- and) etc is this. Simply ensure that what are on the right- hand side of these two conjunctions are both in the same structure or part of speech. As per the tenets of this creed,
(A) is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is ---- perfect bet; and correct choice
(B) not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is --- //ism problem
(C) is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet --- not only is missing
(D) is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is --- not only is missing
(E) is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet--- //ism problem
A special note on “not only--- but also”. It is not imperative that when you use not only, you have to necessarily use ‘but also’ You can be content with ‘not only--- but’ and leave out the ‘also’. But such a phenomenon is rare in GMAT domain. Just keep it in your memory bank. But if you uses - but also- , you must necessarily have - not only - in the first arm. You can not dispense with -not only-, in such cases.

Some theory about yet. Yet is one of the FANBOYS (For, And, Not, But, Or, Yet and So) coordinating conjunctions. A coordinating conjunction can perfectly merge two ICS with just a comma. But you must ensure that the conjunction is necessarily there.

I ran fast, for I wanted the catch the train.
I ran fast, and (I) caught the train
I am not running fast, nor do I intend to
I ran fast but (I) missed the train
I have to run fast, or I will miss the train
I ran fast, yet (I) missed the train
I ran fast, so I caught the train
In some cases you may repeat the subject or simply ignore it; still the sentences make sense
As per this maxim, yet preceded by a comma can join two independent clauses. But using just yet without a verb will break the //ism. You cannot combine a clause and a phrase.
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 29 Jul 2014, 04:52
mikemcgarry wrote:
manimgoindowndown wrote:
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.
(A) is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(B) not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is
(C) is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet
(D) is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(E) is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet

I'm happy to help with this. :-) This is a great question --- MGMAT really writes good questions!

The basic issue in this one is --- where the common words fall when you have parallel elements in a "not only ... but also" structure. Here's a blog that addresses this issue:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/common-par ... orrection/

Consider the following abstract structure involving "not only ... but also" or any similar correlative structure.

blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

I am going to call the purple part "outside" the "not only ... but also" structure, and the green part "inside" the structure. The BIG IDEA is that any common word that applies to both the parallel terms inside the structure can appear
(a) one outside the structure
or
(b) twice inside the structure, once before each term

For example, this is legal:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

This is also legal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah

But this is illegal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also blah blah blah
and this is similarly illegal:
blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
Those have the common term once inside only. A favorite illegal pattern, very common the GMAT SC, is this:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
the good old "once outside, once inside" mistake --- they love this one!

In this MGMAT SC question, the simple word "is" the common word that applies to both parallel terms.
(A) correctly has the word appear once outside the "not only ... but also" structure --- this is correct.
(B) has the word "is" once inside, in front of the first term, omitted from the second term
(C) & (D) don't have the not only at all, just the but also --- the structure is incomplete
(E) ah, the classic "once outside, once inside" mistake

Here's another practice SC question exploring some of the same ideas:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3290
When you submit your answer to that question, the next page will have a full video explanation.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Mike :-)



Thanks for the explanation Matt. However, in choice A not only preceedes an adverb (completely) while but also preceedes a verb (designed). Doesn't it make the sentence structurally not parallel. Please help
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 29 Jul 2014, 12:09
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rishabchoraria wrote:
Thanks for the explanation Matt. However, in choice A not only preceedes an adverb (completely) while but also preceedes a verb (designed). Doesn't it make the sentence structurally not parallel. Please help

Dear rishabchoraria,
I'm happy to respond. :-) BTW, my name is Mike. :-)

Here's version (A), the OA:
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.

The Parallelism in this OA is perfect. You see, parallelism is not purely a grammatical structure following strict mathematical rules --- if you get too formalistic about parallelism, you will completely misunderstand it. Logic & meaning are as important to parallel structure as is grammar. Here, we are giving two descriptions of the Trail --- it is
(1) completely man-made
(2) designed exclusively for human use
In terms of meaning, these two phrases are completely parallel. Don't be so literalistic in your analysis of parallelism --- parallelism is a highly sophisticated structure that accommodates a wide variety of constructions. If you approach it in a formulaic manner, you will totally misunderstand it.

Here are a couple blogs you may find helpful:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/parallelis ... orrection/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-paral ... ce-inside/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/dropping-c ... -the-gmat/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2014, 05:30
mikemcgarry wrote:
manimgoindowndown wrote:
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.
(A) is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(B) not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is
(C) is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet
(D) is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(E) is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet

I'm happy to help with this. :-) This is a great question --- MGMAT really writes good questions!

The basic issue in this one is --- where the common words fall when you have parallel elements in a "not only ... but also" structure. Here's a blog that addresses this issue:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/common-par ... orrection/

Consider the following abstract structure involving "not only ... but also" or any similar correlative structure.

blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

I am going to call the purple part "outside" the "not only ... but also" structure, and the green part "inside" the structure. The BIG IDEA is that any common word that applies to both the parallel terms inside the structure can appear
(a) one outside the structure
or
(b) twice inside the structure, once before each term

For example, this is legal:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also blah blah blah

This is also legal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah

But this is illegal:
blah blah blah not only COMMON blah blah blah but also blah blah blah
and this is similarly illegal:
blah blah blah not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
Those have the common term once inside only. A favorite illegal pattern, very common the GMAT SC, is this:
blah blah blah COMMON not only blah blah blah but also COMMON blah blah blah
the good old "once outside, once inside" mistake --- they love this one!

In this MGMAT SC question, the simple word "is" the common word that applies to both parallel terms.
(A) correctly has the word appear once outside the "not only ... but also" structure --- this is correct.
(B) has the word "is" once inside, in front of the first term, omitted from the second term
(C) & (D) don't have the not only at all, just the but also --- the structure is incomplete
(E) ah, the classic "once outside, once inside" mistake

Here's another practice SC question exploring some of the same ideas:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3290
When you submit your answer to that question, the next page will have a full video explanation.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Mike :-)


Mike please explain why in A , "yet (it) is classified.." why "it" is assumed here? Why ? :( when do we know that the subject even when not stated is there by default?
Just because of this i thought A was wrong. :( and marked B in a hurry :(
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2014, 09:04
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tushain wrote:
Mike please explain why in A , "yet (it) is classified.." why "it" is assumed here? Why ? :( when do we know that the subject even when not stated is there by default?
Just because of this i thought A was wrong. :( and marked B in a hurry :(

Dear tushain,
I'm happy to help. :-)

Parallelism is very tricky, because it can take many forms. One perfectly valid form is two independent clauses in parallel, typically used when the two subjects are different.
I walk and Chris runs.
When the subject is the same, we can simply put two verbs in parallel with the same subject.
I walk sometimes and drive sometimes.
It would be repetitive to state the subject twice.

Fundamentally, that's the structure here. Here it is, very simplified.
... it is man-made, yet is classified as a state park.
It's just that the first independent clause is very complicated --- it has a "not only ... but also" structure nested inside of it. Nevertheless, we have the same parallelism --- two verbs parallel with a common subject.
... it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.

Recognizing parallelism is hard, because parallelism can often take so many forms, and because the GMAT loves long sentences with one complicated grammatical structure nested inside another, as we have here. For more on nested grammatical structures, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/nested-gra ... orrection/

My friend, you have probably heard me say this before, but the only way you develop the skills to recognize complex parallelism is by reading. You need to read every day, at least an hour a day --- that's over and above any GMAT preparations you are doing. Here are some suggestions for what to read:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-reading-list/
There are no magical rules that will help you in 100% of the cases. You need to do the hard work of reading every day, so that you build intuition for the deep structure of sentences.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2014, 10:26
mikemcgarry wrote:
tushain wrote:
Mike please explain why in A , "yet (it) is classified.." why "it" is assumed here? Why ? :( when do we know that the subject even when not stated is there by default?
Just because of this i thought A was wrong. :( and marked B in a hurry :(

Dear tushain,
I'm happy to help. :-)

Parallelism is very tricky, because it can take many forms. One perfectly valid form is two independent clauses in parallel, typically used when the two subjects are different.
I walk and Chris runs.
When the subject is the same, we can simply put two verbs in parallel with the same subject.
I walk sometimes and drive sometimes.
It would be repetitive to state the subject twice.

Fundamentally, that's the structure here. Here it is, very simplified.
... it is man-made, yet is classified as a state park.
It's just that the first independent clause is very complicated --- it has a "not only ... but also" structure nested inside of it. Nevertheless, we have the same parallelism --- two verbs parallel with a common subject.
... it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.

Recognizing parallelism is hard, because parallelism can often take so many forms, and because the GMAT loves long sentences with one complicated grammatical structure nested inside another, as we have here. For more on nested grammatical structures, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/nested-gra ... orrection/

My friend, you have probably heard me say this before, but the only way you develop the skills to recognize complex parallelism is by reading. You need to read every day, at least an hour a day --- that's over and above any GMAT preparations you are doing. Here are some suggestions for what to read:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-reading-list/
There are no magical rules that will help you in 100% of the cases. You need to do the hard work of reading every day, so that you build intuition for the deep structure of sentences.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

Cool now i get this "subject same " rule.
But another doubt .. i might go nuts in this GMAT SC!
I walk and Chris runs. should not a comma be before the "and" ?
I walk , and Chris runs. :\

Also if the two ICs are separated by a semi-colon and both have a common subject , then also is it fine not to repeat the subject?
X runs; drinks juice.
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 27 Jan 2015, 09:49
mike -

Shouldn't the answer be something like this ?

is not only completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet is
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 27 Jan 2015, 10:48
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vedavyas9 wrote:
mike -

Shouldn't the answer be something like this ?

is not only completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet is

Dear vedavyas9,
I'm happy to respond. :-) Here's the OA again:
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.

Parallelism is funny. It's a pattern of matching, but it operates primarily at the level of logic, and only secondarily at the level of grammar. In parallelism, we need to match the overall framing ---- verb to verb, infinitive to infinitive, etc. --- but we don't have to match every single piece within the structure in the exact same place. That is NOT a requirement of parallelism. Sometimes, for rhetorical purposes, it's effective to extend that pattern of matching to the other words within the structure: that can be done for dramatic effect in some instances, but it's not a rigorous grammatical requirement.

Here, the framing structure consists of two noun modifiers in parallel, an adjective "man-made" and a participle "designed." Part of what is important is that these two words have a matching role grammatically. More important, they are also logically parallel --- they both describe the human activity & intentions in creating this trail. The placement of the adjective with respect to the noun-modifiers is secondary --- there is no compelling reason to put each adverb before its respective noun-modifier. In fact, the phrasing in the OA is more natural and make more sense logically. This is a superbly designed sentence: MGMAT produces very good problems.

See:
https://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/paralleli ... orrection/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2015, 09:06
yes mike.

THANK YOU
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Re: Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 29 Jan 2015, 02:20
Hi Mike,

Can you please justify the usage of comma ',' before yet in option A?

thanks.
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Florida s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use [#permalink] New post 29 Jan 2015, 10:34
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DesiGmat wrote:
Hi Mike,

Can you please justify the usage of comma ',' before yet in option A?

thanks.

Dear DesiGmat,
I'm happy to respond. :-) Here's the text of the question again:
Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail, a mixed-use recreation trail paved over an old rail bed, is a curious paradox: it is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is classified as a state park.
(A) is not only completely man-made but also designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(B) not only is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet it is
(C) is completely man-made but also exclusively designed for human use, yet
(D) is completely man-made but also has been designed exclusively for human use, yet is
(E) is not only completely man-made but also is exclusively designed for human use, yet


There are a few ways to respond to your question. One way is simply to say: ultimately, all written language reflects spoken language. The human race invented writing in the first place only because it lasts and what we speak doesn't. All punctuation ultimately reflects the natural pauses and cadences used in real-life speech.

Think about a person who actually knows and cares about Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail. Imagine that person speaking this sentence to us. The nature of the contrast that happens at the word "yet" would almost necessitate a short pause there --- hence, the comma. Do you know the face that someone makes when they are telling you something that they know you won't expect or believe? Imagine the person telling us about this trail making that face right at that point in the sentence. The comma and the word "yet" correspond to the emotion in that face.

You see, if you try to understand punctuation purely as a rule-based, quasi-mathematical exercise, and you overlook the living quality of language, you will miss what really drives language. Think about it. Real people with real motivations & intentions & passions & dreams & frustrations & worries & doubts speak the language, and all those rich nuances of emotion are communicated in the language. Of course, on the GMAT SC, we don't get sentences about people fantasies or love-life problems: it's a little more academic and clinical. Nevertheless, even with this material --- issues of history, issues of economics, even things such as Florida’s Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail --- people have real feelings, real passions and concerns, and this is reflected in the language.

It's very easy to fall into a narrow literalist view when tackling GMAT SC. It can be so helpful to step back and remember: each sentence theoretically was written by someone who cares about the topic, who is concerned about it enough to communicate something about it to us. If you feel into that person's drives & motivations, that will give you a whole new level of understanding of the way language is used.

Now, having said all that, I can only say --- when there's a strong "change in direction" of the logic of the sentence, a surprising and unexpected turn in the flow of thought, then this often merits a comma. It's common to have commas separating the phrases & clause of strong contrast words from the rest of the sentence, precisely because there's a break in the logical flow of the sentence. That's a general pattern, but not a rigid mathematical rule. Again, it all depends on the living quality of the language.

How do you develop a deeper appreciation of the living quality of the language? Very simple. Read. Read every day, for an hour a day, over and above any GMAT preparations. See these blogs for more detail:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/how-to-imp ... bal-score/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-reading-list/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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