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For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was

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For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2008, 10:01
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302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities


Totally confused.. please help
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2008, 11:25
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities


Totally confused.. please help


This confused me too, darn!

D or E = not sure, but I'll pick D
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New post 16 Dec 2008, 12:47
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities


Totally confused.. please help


I would pick B. "disdain for" is the correct idiom, and "having always professed" correctly modifies "Auden".
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2008, 13:45
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lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2008, 13:57
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x2suresh wrote:
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game


what about "disdain" - is "disdain of" the correct idiom? I learned that "disdain for" is the correct one, not "disdain of"
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2008, 14:25
nganle08 wrote:
x2suresh wrote:
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game


what about "disdain" - is "disdain of" the correct idiom? I learned that "disdain for" is the correct one, not "disdain of"



IMO, both are correct idioms.

here is the link from the dictionary which uses "disdain of"


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/disdainful

disdainful
adjective
1. expressing extreme contempt [syn: contemptuous]
2. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2008, 14:27
nganle08 wrote:
x2suresh wrote:
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game


what about "disdain" - is "disdain of" the correct idiom? I learned that "disdain for" is the correct one, not "disdain of"



IMO, both are correct idioms.

here is the link from the dictionary which uses "disdain of"


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/disdainful

disdainful
adjective
1. expressing extreme contempt [syn: contemptuous]
2. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2008, 14:30
Quote:
IMO, both are correct idioms.

here is the link from the dictionary which uses "disdain of"


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/disdainful

disdainful
adjective
1. expressing extreme contempt [syn: contemptuous]
2. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer

Can you explain why B is not the right answer? Thanks
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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nganle08 wrote:
Quote:
IMO, both are correct idioms.

here is the link from the dictionary which uses "disdain of"


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/disdainful

disdainful
adjective
1. expressing extreme contempt [syn: contemptuous]
2. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer

Can you explain why B is not the right answer? Thanks


Take simple example

(A) for all his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments
Despite his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments

Here it clearly shows the contrast.

You can rewrite the above sentence.
Even though he has talent, Nganle used to fall part in tense moments.


(B)Having always talented person, Nganle used to fall apart in tesne moments.
Here we are not


B changes the original meaning..
Ngalnle is talented person and used to fall apart in tense moments.
No contrast here.

I hope you got it
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2008, 15:44
[Take simple example

(A) for all his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments
Despite his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments

Here it clearly shows the contrast.

You can rewrite the above sentence.
Even though he has talent, Nganle used to fall part in tense moments.


(B)Having always talented person, Nganle used to fall apart in tesne moments.
Here we are not


B changes the original meaning..
Ngalnle is talented person and used to fall apart in tense moments.
No contrast here.

I hope you got it[/quote]

Thanks so much. I understand it now.
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2010, 14:29
OA is A

the source is 1000 SC
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Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2013, 03:52
nganle08 wrote:
[Take simple example

(A) for all his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments
Despite his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments

Here it clearly shows the contrast.

You can rewrite the above sentence.
Even though he has talent, Nganle used to fall part in tense moments.


(B)Having always talented person, Nganle used to fall apart in tesne moments.
Here we are not


B changes the original meaning..
Ngalnle is talented person and used to fall apart in tense moments.
No contrast here.

I hope you got it


Thanks so much. I understand it now.[/quote]

Thanks for the explanation ... clears the confusion ...
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Re: For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was [#permalink]

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For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2015, 21:08
x2suresh wrote:
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game


Thanks for the explanation of "For all"! That really helps!

However, let's look at this question in a different angle---Who is the verbs' initializer?
In GMAT, every verb can be regarded as an issue, and every issue needs an initializer (logical subjective).

In this context, we need to know that Auden is the initializer of "profess the disdain", a move that makes his "inveterate literary gossip" really surprising. Let's begin with C.

(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
Wrong.
(1) "professed" is initialized by Auden, correct.
(2) The initializer for "disdain" is unclear, wrong.

(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
Wrong.
Same as C.

(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities
Wrong.
(1) "profession" is probably not initialized by Auden; instead, it is likely that this profession is a common belief, therefore wrong.
(2) The initializer for "disdaining" is unclear, wrong again.

(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
Correct.
By using "for all" (which means "despite"), this option successfully made a surprising atmosphere.

(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
Wrong.
(1) At first glance, it follows our "initializer" judgement.
(2) The tense is wrong.
Consider the process: Can Auden first "profess disdain" and then "was an inveterate literary gossip"?
Probably not. "was an inveterate literary gossip" uses simple tense, and thus describe a fact that happens very often---
This was a habit of Auden, not a decision. So here we cannot accept an order: It is only a contrast.

Oh and BTW:
(1) "Despite/ In spite of/ like": these words are used to make contrast with ONLY ONE NOUN.
(2) "Although/ even though/ Though": these words are either used to make contrast with MORE THAN ONE NOUN, or to make a contrast between ISSUES.
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was   [#permalink] 19 Nov 2015, 21:08
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