Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 21 Sep 2014, 04:30

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

For most people, the left half of the brain controls

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 31 Jul 2008
Posts: 309
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
For most people, the left half of the brain controls [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2008, 20:11
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
For most people, the left half of the brain controls linguistic capabilities, but some people
have their language centers in the right half. When a language center of the brain is
damaged, for example by a stroke, linguistic capabilities are impaired in some way.
Therefore, people who have suffered a serious stroke on the left side of the brain without
suffering any such impairment must have their language centers in the right half.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the reasoning in the argument above
depends?


A. No part of a person’s brain that is damaged by a stroke ever recovers.
B. Impairment of linguistic capabilities does not occur in people who have not
suffered any damage to any language center of the brain.
C. Strokes tend to impair linguistic capabilities more severely than does any other
cause of damage to language centers in the brain.
D. If there are language centers on the left side of the brain, any serious stroke
affecting that side of the brain damages at least one of them.
E. It is impossible to determine which side of the brain contains a person’s language
centers if the person has not suffered damage to either side of the brain.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 04 Aug 2008
Posts: 379
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2008, 21:19
E

argument assumes that there is no other way to know where is the lingo center
_________________

The one who flies is worthy. The one who is worthy flies. The one who doesn't fly isn't worthy

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Aug 2008
Posts: 234
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2008, 22:56
IMO E.

if it was possible to locate the language centres witout having to depend on occurence of stroke, the argument clearly falls apart....
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
Posts: 106
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2008, 23:16
(D)

If the language center is on the left, the stroke must cause some damage. If no damage then CR concludes that the language center is not even on the left side.
_________________

Kick GMAT ass

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Aug 2008
Posts: 234
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 00:24
the argument is about concluding the location of the centres...partial or total effect is outside the scope of the argument
Bidisha wrote:
(D)

If the language center is on the left, the stroke must cause some damage. If no damage then CR concludes that the language center is not even on the left side.
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 17 Jun 2008
Posts: 1579
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 184 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 00:41
IMO A. If my answer is correct, I will explain it.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 Jun 2008
Posts: 82
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 00:44
D as well

E is too strong for me.
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 207 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 04:32
stallone wrote:
For most people, the left half of the brain controls linguistic capabilities, but some people
have their language centers in the right half. When a language center of the brain is
damaged, for example by a stroke, linguistic capabilities are impaired in some way.
Therefore, people who have suffered a serious stroke on the left side of the brain without
suffering any such impairment must have their language centers in the right half.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the reasoning in the argument above
depends?


A. No part of a person’s brain that is damaged by a stroke ever recovers.
B. Impairment of linguistic capabilities does not occur in people who have not
suffered any damage to any language center of the brain.
C. Strokes tend to impair linguistic capabilities more severely than does any other
cause of damage to language centers in the brain.
D. If there are language centers on the left side of the brain, any serious stroke
affecting that side of the brain damages at least one of them.
E. It is impossible to determine which side of the brain contains a person’s language
centers if the person has not suffered damage to either side of the brain.



I honestly feel that the answer should be B. The reason I don't like option E is that the argument is not focused on whether it's possible to determine where the language center is exactly located. The argument is a casual: The argument concludes that the damage of the language center causes impairment of linguistic capabilities. This means that the argument assumes that no other cause is possible to this effect of impairment. So, option B points out to this very fact that other causes indeed do not exist.
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2008
Posts: 1436
Followers: 33

Kudos [?]: 217 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 17:05
tarek99 wrote:
stallone wrote:
For most people, the left half of the brain controls linguistic capabilities, but some people
have their language centers in the right half. When a language center of the brain is
damaged, for example by a stroke, linguistic capabilities are impaired in some way.
Therefore, people who have suffered a serious stroke on the left side of the brain without
suffering any such impairment must have their language centers in the right half.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the reasoning in the argument above
depends?


A. No part of a person’s brain that is damaged by a stroke ever recovers.
B. Impairment of linguistic capabilities does not occur in people who have not
suffered any damage to any language center of the brain.
C. Strokes tend to impair linguistic capabilities more severely than does any other
cause of damage to language centers in the brain.
D. If there are language centers on the left side of the brain, any serious stroke
affecting that side of the brain damages at least one of them.
E. It is impossible to determine which side of the brain contains a person’s language
centers if the person has not suffered damage to either side of the brain.



I honestly feel that the answer should be B. The reason I don't like option E is that the argument is not focused on whether it's possible to determine where the language center is exactly located. The argument is a casual: The argument concludes that the damage of the language center causes impairment of linguistic capabilities. This means that the argument assumes that no other cause is possible to this effect of impairment. So, option B points out to this very fact that other causes indeed do not exist.


I disagree. Initially I picked B and started to do a negation test. It does not have any effect on the conclusion. Even though E is strong, it takes the conclusion apart. The conclusion is determining the location of LC based on stroke and its effect on L. If E were false, then we don't need to analyze stroke and its repercussions to tell whether a person has LC in Left or right brain. So E has to be true, even though impossible sounds a bit strong
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2007
Posts: 793
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 104 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 17:50
Conclusion: People who have suffered a serious stroke on the left side of the brain without
suffering any such impairment must have their language centers in the right half.


A. No part of a person’s brain that is damaged by a stroke ever recovers. [Irrelevant]

B. Impairment of linguistic capabilities does not occur in people who have not
suffered any damage to any language center of the brain. [Ok but has nothing to do with the conclusion]

C. Strokes tend to impair linguistic capabilities more severely than does any other
cause of damage to language centers in the brain. [Argument is not about comparison between strokes and others]

D. If there are language centers on the left side of the brain, any serious stroke
affecting that side of the brain damages at least one of them. [Hold on]

E. It is impossible to determine which side of the brain contains a person’s language
centers if the person has not suffered damage to either side of the brain. [Irrelevant]

Answer: D
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Posts: 50
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 19:16
For most people, the left half of the brain controls linguistic capabilities, but some people
have their language centers in the right half. When a language center of the brain is
damaged, for example by a stroke, linguistic capabilities are impaired in some way.
Therefore, people who have suffered a serious stroke on the left side of the brain without
suffering any such impairment must have their language centers in the right half.

My prephrase before reading the question stem is that the language center must be located in only one half. Too bad this wasn't an answer choice. But let's proceed to the answer choices...

Which of the following is an assumption on which the reasoning in the argument above
depends?

A. No part of a person’s brain that is damaged by a stroke ever recovers.
Eliminate:Scope. We can't assume anything about recovery. We're only interested in language and which part of the brain it comes from.
B. Impairment of linguistic capabilities does not occur in people who have not
suffered any damage to any language center of the brain.
Eliminate:Scope. This is the wrong group of people.We're talking about people who HAVE suffered from a stroke.
C. Strokes tend to impair linguistic capabilities more severely than does any other
cause of damage to language centers in the brain.
Eliminate: Too strong. "Tend" means more often than not. Moreover, this statement is comparing different degrees of damage from other causes as compared to a serious stroke.
D. If there are language centers on the left side of the brain, any serious stroke
affecting that side of the brain damages at least one of them.
My choice. If a serious stroke occurs and the bleed in the brain does not affect any linguistic centers, the person is still utilizing his left brain. Therefore, the conclusion that the person has their linguistic center on the right half of the brain does not follow.
E. It is impossible to determine which side of the brain contains a person’s language
centers if the person has not suffered damage to either side of the brain.
Eliminate: Too strong. "Impossible?" Everything is possible, the impossible only takes longer.....har har har....But seriously, the scope has shifted to people who have not suffered damage to their brain. This statement is too broad.
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 18 May 2008
Posts: 1300
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 115 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 22:24
I will go against the current and chose A.The conclusion says a person must be having language centre in the right half,if he got stroke in the left side w/t suffering any impairements. But wht if the language centre was in left half only & the damaged part recovered? thus there wnt be any impairement? Hence, wnt the argument fall apart? Any takers?

stallone wrote:
For most people, the left half of the brain controls linguistic capabilities, but some people
have their language centers in the right half. When a language center of the brain is
damaged, for example by a stroke, linguistic capabilities are impaired in some way.
Therefore, people who have suffered a serious stroke on the left side of the brain without
suffering any such impairment must have their language centers in the right half.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the reasoning in the argument above
depends?


A. No part of a person’s brain that is damaged by a stroke ever recovers.
B. Impairment of linguistic capabilities does not occur in people who have not
suffered any damage to any language center of the brain.
C. Strokes tend to impair linguistic capabilities more severely than does any other
cause of damage to language centers in the brain.
D. If there are language centers on the left side of the brain, any serious stroke
affecting that side of the brain damages at least one of them.
E. It is impossible to determine which side of the brain contains a person’s language
centers if the person has not suffered damage to either side of the brain.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 27 Sep 2008
Posts: 35
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 22:49
D..again.!

What is the OA?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Oct 2008
Posts: 119
Followers: 9

Kudos [?]: 72 [0], given: 0

Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2008, 23:54
First attempt to post this explanation failed...

The answer is D. The conclusion of the argument is an if-then claim: If a person suffers a serious stroke on the left side AND his/her linguistic capabilities are not impaired, then all his/her language centres are on the right side. The only relevant evidence is the statement that if a language centre is damaged, then a person's linguistic capabilities will be impaired. The contrapositive of the evidence (which is logically exactly the same statement) is that if a person's linguistic capabilities are not impaired, then no language centres were damaged.

We can combine the contrapositive version of the evidence with the "if" part of the conclusion and produce the following: If a person suffers a serious stroke on the left side and his/her linguistic capabilities are not impaired, then no language centres were damaged. This is as far as the evidence gets us. In order to create the entire conclusion of the argument, we need to add one more if-then statement: If no language centres were damaged, then there are no language centres on the left side. This if-then statement is the missing assumption.

Now look at D, and notice that it is the contrapositive of that missing assumption -- which means that it IS the missing assumption, because a contrapositive and its "original" are logically the same statement.
_________________

Grumpy

Kaplan Canada LSAT/GMAT/GRE teacher and tutor

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Sep 2008
Posts: 15
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 14 Nov 2008, 06:22
Answer D.Since the statement assumes that if the stroke were to happen on the left side , the language centre is bound to be affected.

so the choice D correctly states that implied assumption.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 31 Jul 2008
Posts: 309
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 14 Nov 2008, 11:33
thanks for all ur replies .... the OA is D
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 207 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 15 Nov 2008, 19:40
but in option D, what does "at least one of them" refer to?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 04 Aug 2008
Posts: 379
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 15 Nov 2008, 21:40
this question is ridiculus 'at least one of them'
_________________

The one who flies is worthy. The one who is worthy flies. The one who doesn't fly isn't worthy

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Oct 2008
Posts: 119
Followers: 9

Kudos [?]: 72 [0], given: 0

Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 15 Nov 2008, 22:20
I'm kind of old, and in my experience, the only stupid question is one that you didn't ask.

"at least one of them" means "at least one of the language centres". There is no other plural noun which "them" could refer to.
_________________

Grumpy

Kaplan Canada LSAT/GMAT/GRE teacher and tutor

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Apr 2008
Posts: 452
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 48 [0], given: 1

Re: CR.... [#permalink] New post 16 Nov 2008, 03:23
IMO D)

If you remove the assumption that stroke does affect a language centre, then arguument fails.
Re: CR....   [#permalink] 16 Nov 2008, 03:23
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Right-brained people are more likely than left-brained fozzzy 2 09 Jun 2013, 04:02
11 Bicycle Safety expert : Bicycling on the left half of the georgepaul0071987 14 13 Oct 2011, 10:19
Q40: For most people, the left half of the brain controls jet1445 14 15 Jul 2007, 07:24
For most people, the left half of the brain controls jerrywu 4 26 Aug 2006, 19:57
For most people, the left half of the brain controls chunjuwu 4 16 Jan 2005, 09:01
Display posts from previous: Sort by

For most people, the left half of the brain controls

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 22 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.