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For the past 13 years, high school guidance counselors

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Director
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For the past 13 years, high school guidance counselors [#permalink] New post 16 Apr 2007, 21:58
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

Question Stats:

100% (02:34) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 2 sessions
For the past 13 years, high school guidance counselors nationwide have implemented an aggressive program to convince high school students to select careers requiring college degrees. The government reported that the percentage of last year’s high school graduates who went on to college was 15 percent greater than the percentage of those who graduated 10 years ago and did so. The counselors concluded from this report that the program had been successful.

The guidance counselors’ reasoning depends on which one of the following assumptions about high school graduates?
(A) The number of graduates who went on to college remained constant each year during the 10-year period.
(B) Any college courses that the graduates take will improve their career prospects.
(C) Some of the graduates who went on to college never received guidance from a high school counselor.
(D) There has been a decrease in the number of graduates who go on to college without career plans.
(E) Many of last year’s graduates who went on to college did so in order to prepare for careers requiring college degrees.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Apr 2007, 22:15
I would go with E.

In order to conclude that the program was successful, those students who have gone to college must have gone to college BECAUSE they selected careers requiring college degrees. (The "goal" of the program was to convince students to select careers requiring college degrees)

Only E mentions this.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 01:34
I'm going with A here..
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 02:26
Conclusion: programm successful, i.e. more graduates than 10 years ago.

Evidence: percentage of last year’s high school graduates wwas 15 percent greater than the percentage graduated 10 years ago.

Assumption: 0.1 x G < 0.15 G, whereas G= constant

A) The number of graduates remained constant each year during the 10-year period.

states this so that the arguement is true!

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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 02:32
catgmat wrote:
Conclusion: programm successful, i.e. more graduates than 10 years ago.

Evidence: percentage of last year’s high school graduates wwas 15 percent greater than the percentage graduated 10 years ago.

Assumption: 0.1 x G < 0.15 G, whereas G= constant

A) The number of graduates remained constant each year during the 10-year period.

states this so that the arguement is true!

cheers


I had an identical explanation but the OA is E...any thoughts??
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 03:40
catgmat wrote:
Conclusion: programm successful, i.e. more graduates than 10 years ago.

Evidence: percentage of last year’s high school graduates wwas 15 percent greater than the percentage graduated 10 years ago.

Assumption: 0.1 x G < 0.15 G, whereas G= constant

A) The number of graduates remained constant each year during the 10-year period.

states this so that the arguement is true!

cheers


No wonder percentage questions are tricky. I fell in the same trap. It's E for sure.

Well I had chosen A because it would have made sense had the number of HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES (Not the Numbers of People going to College) remained constant. The higher percentage of those going to college (15%) would have actually translated into MORE numbers.

But A is irrelevant here since it talks not of number of students graduating but those going to college.

E on the other hand hits the assumption - if the students despite going to colleges didn't prepare for college degree careers then the purpose of the program (hence the focus of the argument) would have been defeated.

E stands.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 07:05
Phew...thats a tough one...can u explain a little...both A and E talk about graduates in general.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 19:02
Premises 1: counselors nationwide have implemented an aggressive program to convince high school students to select careers requiring college degrees.
Premises 2:The government reported that the percentage of last year’s high school graduates who went on to college was 15 percent greater than the percentage of those who graduated 10 years ago and did so.

Conclusion:The counselors concluded from this report that the program had been successful.

assumption->Kids went to college to establish their careers.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 19:20
A!

if percentage of graduate students were increaing in last year then this 15% increare didn't happen overnight.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2007, 09:30
The OA is E.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2007, 09:31
The OA is E.
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2007, 22:20
Yes the answer is E only.
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Apr 2007, 05:47
Answer should be 'E'.

I think why 'A' is NOT CORRECT-

'A' says -The number of graduates who went on to college remained constant each year during the 10-year period.


Assuming this will not make the conclusion strong. As we don't know about the base number (high school graduates).

If the assumption were -
The number of high school graduates remained constant each year during the 10-year period.. This means that the percentage of the college goers is increased and the base number (high school graduates) remains constant. This would have helped the conclusion to be true.
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Apr 2007, 20:21
vshaunak@gmail.com wrote:
Answer should be 'E'.

I think why 'A' is NOT CORRECT-

'A' says -The number of graduates who went on to college remained constant each year during the 10-year period.


Assuming this will not make the conclusion strong. As we don't know about the base number (high school graduates).

If the assumption were -
The number of high school graduates remained constant each year during the 10-year period.. This means that the percentage of the college goers is increased and the base number (high school graduates) remains constant. This would have helped the conclusion to be true.


Well after going through all the above explanation i am still confused why A is wrong. Can any one explain me why A is wrong.

Javed.

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 [#permalink] New post 22 Apr 2007, 22:13
dwivedys wrote:
catgmat wrote:
Conclusion: programm successful, i.e. more graduates than 10 years ago.

Evidence: percentage of last yearтАЩs high school graduates wwas 15 percent greater than the percentage graduated 10 years ago.

Assumption: 0.1 x G < 0.15 G, whereas G= constant

A) The number of graduates remained constant each year during the 10-year period.

states this so that the arguement is true!

cheers


No wonder percentage questions are tricky. I fell in the same trap. It's E for sure.

Well I had chosen A because it would have made sense had the number of HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES (Not the Numbers of People going to College) remained constant. The higher percentage of those going to college (15%) would have actually translated into MORE numbers.

But A is irrelevant here since it talks not of number of students graduating but those going to college.

E on the other hand hits the assumption - if the students despite going to colleges didn't prepare for college degree careers then the purpose of the program (hence the focus of the argument) would have been defeated.

E stands.


Also, in A it is not clear which 10 year period. Just last 10 years or 10 year s before last year?
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Re: For the past 13 years, high school guidance counselors [#permalink] New post 24 Jan 2014, 04:05
vineetgupta wrote:
For the past 13 years, high school guidance counselors nationwide have implemented an aggressive program to convince high school students to select careers requiring college degrees. The government reported that the percentage of last year’s high school graduates who went on to college was 15 percent greater than the percentage of those who graduated 10 years ago and did so. The counselors concluded from this report that the program had been successful.

The guidance counselors’ reasoning depends on which one of the following assumptions about high school graduates?
(A) The number of graduates who went on to college remained constant each year during the 10-year period.
(B) Any college courses that the graduates take will improve their career prospects.
(C) Some of the graduates who went on to college never received guidance from a high school counselor.
(D) There has been a decrease in the number of graduates who go on to college without career plans.
(E) Many of last year’s graduates who went on to college did so in order to prepare for careers requiring college degrees.



I think the correct answer is E.
I chose it because it seems to be the most adequate as the aim of the high school guidance counselors is to convince high school students to select careers requiring college degrees which means that the reasoning depends on the fact that students go to college to to prepare for careers requiring college degrees and that are not other reasons for them.

Hope it's correct and clear, Please if I am wrong correct me! :)
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Re: [#permalink] New post 25 Jan 2014, 09:54
vineetgupta wrote:
Phew...thats a tough one...can u explain a little...both A and E talk about graduates in general.



A is wrong because it is talking about constant students ..
if we negate this choice

The number of graduates who went on to college remained variable each year during the 10-year period.

so it can be 1 student admitted or 1000 students per year we can't weaken the argument ...
because we just know the percentage of students ...

on this basis A can be easily eliminated.

Thanks
Rahul
Re:   [#permalink] 25 Jan 2014, 09:54
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