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French Revolution

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Manager
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French Revolution [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2007, 19:33
The case of the French Revolution is typically regarded as the best evidence for the claim that societies can reap more benefit than harm from a revolution. But even the French Revolution serves this role poorly, since France at the time of the Revolution had a unique advantage. Despite the Revolution, the same civil servants and functionaries remained in office, carrying on the day-to-day work of government, and thus many of the disruptions that revolutions normally bring were avoided.
Which one of the following most accurately characterizes the argumentative strategy used in the passage?
(A) demonstrating that the claim argued against is internally inconsistent
(B) supporting a particular position on the basis of general principles
(C) opposing a claim by undermining evidence offered in support of that claim
(D) justifying a view through the use of a series of persuasive examples
(E) comparing two positions in order to illustrate their relative strengths and weaknesses
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2007, 19:45
May be C.

Thats the only one which I think which tells us why the argumentgiven is counter-productive.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2007, 22:21
I too agree with C.

A - the claim argued is internally consistant - so eliminated.

B - no general principles are cited to support the cliam that "french revolution serves this role poorly" - eliminated

C - correct

D - there is no series of examples -so eliminated

E- there is no two positions to compare.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2007, 22:24
C. There is a opposition to the claim ('even the French Revolution serves this role poorly') and it is done by undermining the evidence offered in support of the claim (espite the Revolution, the same civil servants and functionaries remained in office, carrying on the day-to-day work of government, and thus many of the disruptions that revolutions normally bring were avoided.)
  [#permalink] 02 Sep 2007, 22:24
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