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From GMATClub v04: Feng Shui, the ancient Chinese art of

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From GMATClub v04: Feng Shui, the ancient Chinese art of [#permalink] New post 02 Dec 2010, 07:55
From GMATClub v04:

Quote:
Feng Shui, the ancient Chinese art of harmonious design, first became fashionable in the United States in the 1960s, when decorators heavily influenced by New Age sensibilities began selling Feng Shui to their clients as a chance to increase health and wealth as well as to have a more beautiful home. The Chinese practice of Feng Shui depends on directing the healthy flow of Chi, or life energy, by aligning the home itself according to the four cardinal directions and objects in the home in such a way as to receive and maintain this positive energy. In ancient practice, the most important objects in the home include the front door, or “Mouth of Chi,” where most life energy is received; the stove, which represents wealth and abundance; and the bed, whose positive position controls relationship energy. American popularized versions of Feng Shui, by contrast, show hardly any concern for directional alignment or key objects, preferring instead the excessive use of crystals, mirrors, and table-top water features, which, though perhaps entertaining, display precious little respect for the real influence of Chi.


Which of the following best describes the author’s tone in the passage?

(A) Both supportive and critical
(B) Alternately warm and sarcastic
(C) Wavering between disagreement and support
(D) Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
(E) Variously shocked and proud

I disagree with the OA:

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA is B. Please show me a single example of sarcasm in this article. I think A is a better answer. The author is supportive of the Chinese version of Feng Shui, and critical of the Americanized one. Although you could also say the author is warm towards Chinese Feng Shui, s/he is never sarcastic in describing the Amercanized version.
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Re: Feng Shui [#permalink] New post 02 Dec 2010, 12:51
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You and me both.

I got A as well. I don't read sarcasm from his statements about the American Practice of Feng Shui. He seems more critical of the American approach to Feng Shui, when compared to the Chinese approach.

The flow of the passage is neither warm, nor sarcastic, but rather informative.

TehJay wrote:
From GMATClub v04:

Quote:
Feng Shui, the ancient Chinese art of harmonious design, first became fashionable in the United States in the 1960s, when decorators heavily influenced by New Age sensibilities began selling Feng Shui to their clients as a chance to increase health and wealth as well as to have a more beautiful home. The Chinese practice of Feng Shui depends on directing the healthy flow of Chi, or life energy, by aligning the home itself according to the four cardinal directions and objects in the home in such a way as to receive and maintain this positive energy. In ancient practice, the most important objects in the home include the front door, or “Mouth of Chi,” where most life energy is received; the stove, which represents wealth and abundance; and the bed, whose positive position controls relationship energy. American popularized versions of Feng Shui, by contrast, show hardly any concern for directional alignment or key objects, preferring instead the excessive use of crystals, mirrors, and table-top water features, which, though perhaps entertaining, display precious little respect for the real influence of Chi.


Which of the following best describes the author’s tone in the passage?

(A) Both supportive and critical
(B) Alternately warm and sarcastic
(C) Wavering between disagreement and support
(D) Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
(E) Variously shocked and proud

I disagree with the OA:

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA is B. Please show me a single example of sarcasm in this article. I think A is a better answer. The author is supportive of the Chinese version of Feng Shui, and critical of the Americanized one. Although you could also say the author is warm towards Chinese Feng Shui, s/he is never sarcastic in describing the Amercanized version.
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Re: Feng Shui [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2010, 04:02
I got A as well instantaneously. However on second look B makes more sense as there is fundamental problem with A.
A says both. This means at the Same time author is supportive and critical. This will be difficult for many situations leave aside this passage specifically. He is supportive for one and critical for the other not both together for each

B. This treads on a fine line between definition of words . Warm and sarcastic compared to critical and supportive. Howeve it wins bcos it gets it's fundamenTal correct, which is "alternate between". Yes, the author does alternate between being warm and sarcastic (debatable: maybe GMAT club test makers can throw some more light?$

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Re: Feng Shui [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2010, 07:04
I'm with you guys on this one. The author is critical in his use of words instead of sarcastic - "American popularized versions of Feng Shui, by contrast, show hardly any concern for directional alignment or key objects, preferring instead the excessive use of crystals, mirrors, and table-top water features, which, though perhaps entertaining, display precious little respect for the real influence of Chi."

:shock: Or could it be this area of the article that is sarcastic - "when decorators heavily influenced by New Age sensibilities began selling Feng Shui to their clients as a chance to increase health and wealth"?

Where is the question from btw? :roll:
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Re: Feng Shui [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2010, 19:06
Quote:

I disagree with the OA:

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA is B. Please show me a single example of sarcasm in this article. I think A is a better answer. The author is supportive of the Chinese version of Feng Shui, and critical of the Americanized one. Although you could also say the author is warm towards Chinese Feng Shui, s/he is never sarcastic in describing the Amercanized version.
[/quote]

The last line of the passage shows that the author is sarcastic abt the passage..."display precious little respect for the real influence of Chi"

Precious little respect... :roll:
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Re: Feng Shui [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2010, 06:59
That's not sarcastic, it's straightforward criticism.
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Re: Feng Shui [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2010, 13:35
i too agree with u guys....how are we to detect sarcasm when there is no hint of one :wall .......
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Re: Feng Shui   [#permalink] 11 Dec 2010, 13:35
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From GMATClub v04: Feng Shui, the ancient Chinese art of

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