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From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics

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From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2011, 12:21
Shalom!
During my preparation for the Quant section of the GMAT I came across the Indian techniques of Vedic Mathematics. Since I cannot use a calculator during the test I conducted a search for any easier ways to solve math problems without using a calculator. What I found was Vedic Mathematics. My question is has anyone in this club used Vedic Math techniques while taking the GMAT?
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Re: From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2011, 18:21
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While I have never used the Vedic Mathematics books or concepts, being an Indian, I can attest that some of the books are held in high esteem, and are very popular among Indian standardized tests (read Engineering entrance, IT company entrances etc. where time is key). Books such as 'Shakuntala Devi' are considered a 'must' for these exams but then again complex calculations are part of these exams. I have seen some models (or tricks) and they seemed to be really cool.

I wouldn't recommend wasting time on them, as you shouldn't be requiring any shortcuts or calculations on GMAT, particularly if you don't have much time for your exam preparation.

My 2 cents.
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Re: From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2011, 18:23
I meant shortcuts on calculations.

Also, anyone with personal experience can add more, as it benefits me also.
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Re: From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics [#permalink] New post 23 Apr 2011, 12:52
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I'd not care if anybody does offer short cuts to calculation, if my focussed objective was to attack GMAT questions. Vedic mathematics be a favorite pass time, when you do have the time. I love the Lilavati Ganitam (an ancient Indian treatise) as a favorite pass-time. Spending time on basic concepts would be more fruitful.

That said, I do use some shortcuts when l see numbers on the GMAT questions. More often than not, I have the following numbers on my finger tips:

sqrt(10) ~ 3.15
sqrt(2) ~ 1.41
sqrt (3) ~ 1.73
sqrt(5) ~ 2.25
sqrt(7) ~ 2.65

I also use extensively the following rule:

The square of any number in a form x5 is x(x+1)25.

A little explanation for the above rule:

325*325 = (32*33)25=105625

This is what I used to compute sqrt(10) above. 1000 is nearly 32*31 so sqrt(10) should be b/w 32/10 and 31/10 or nearly 3.15. The result may not be the most accurate computation on earth. But GMAT does not require you to be more computative than this. At least, that is what I have observed. Others can correct me if I am wrong.

Regards
Rahul
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Re: From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics [#permalink] New post 23 Apr 2011, 13:57
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Though I have been quite a proponent of Vedic Math and used it to an extent, you dont need it - at all - for GMAT. The calculations in GMAT are very basic e.g. you will not need to multiply a two digit with another two digit number very often. If you see yourself faced with multiplying anything more complex, it means you didn't get the point of the question. Whatever calculations are a part of GMAT, they can be easily done orally (for the most part). What is important is how well you understand the concepts. So I wouldn't advice you to invest time in picking up Vedic Math.
That said, there are a few things that you need to 'remember'. They are useful in quite a few questions.
1. Squares of first 20 numbers
2. Cubes of first 10 numbers
3. Multiplication Tables till 15 at least (preferably till 20)
4. Exponents - Of 2 till \(2^{10}\), Of 3 till \(3^6\), Of 4 and 5 till \(4^4\) and \(5^4\).

Knowing these are relevant to GMAT.
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Re: From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics [#permalink] New post 25 Jun 2011, 16:33
Shalom Karishma,
Thank you for this response. I wrote down all the things you said I need to remember. I have a question. I have noticed in some of the harder GMAT Quant questions there are some big numbers to be calculated (ex. 650-plus-level-question-114310.html). How do I go about doing this without the use of a calculator?
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Re: From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics [#permalink] New post 27 Jun 2011, 23:34
Nice list Karishma
Re: From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics   [#permalink] 27 Jun 2011, 23:34
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From MitDavidDv: Indian Vedic Mathematics

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