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Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as

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Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 03:38
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Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as manifestations of the laws of physics, would appear the same to someone on the deck of a ship moving smoothly and uniformly through the water as a person standing on land.

A. water as a

B. water as to a

C. water; just as it would to

D. water, as it would to the

E. water; just as to the
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 04:08
I will go for B.

C and D are out because of "it". E is out because of "just as".
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 26 May 2010, 12:24
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Nihit wrote:
Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as manifestations of the laws of physics, would appear the same to someone on the deck of a ship moving smoothly and uniformly through the water as a person standing on land.

A. water as a

B. water as to a

C. water; just as it would to

D. water, as it would to the

E. water; just as to the


There is no doubt that B is the answer but don't you guys think that in D a do(appear) is missing ?

natural phenomena would appear the same to X as it (natural phenomena) would do (appear) to Y.
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2010, 09:56
I'l go with "B" as it is clear and concise..
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 16 Mar 2011, 18:08
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D is wrong because the comma after water makes the comparison choppy and the "the person" is used in place of "a person". Completely different meanings.
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 16 Mar 2011, 20:11
A compares manifestation to person, C and D use wrong pronoun, and E is wordy, also use of semi colon is wrong as the words after semicolon dont make a full sentence.
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2011, 02:08
+1 FOR B. Correct Idiom is same to X as to Y
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2012, 15:54
It's tough memorizing all these idioms. but yes I agree with B.
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2012, 08:22
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I will go with the option B because the idiom used is "the same to X as to Y".
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 08 Mar 2012, 13:05
I have chosen B for the answer:

A. This answer choice does not maintain parallelism with the comparison. The reason is because we are missing a "to."

You could look at the comparison like this:

Natural phenomena would appear the same:
- to someone on the deck of a ship moving smoothly and uniformly through the water AS
- to a someone (or person in this case) standing on land

B. This comparison is clear and maintains parallelism.

C. The semicolon creates a sentence fragment because we are left wondering where the other half of the comparison is. Also, the semicolon creates a break in logical meaning, but we want this to be continuous.

D. This answer does not maintain parallelism because of the addition of the word "would." I wasn't sure if the pronoun "it" was ambiguous, but this wasn't the deciding factor for me anyway.

E. Again, the semicolon creates a break in the comparison and it leaves the main clause as a fragment.
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2013, 20:59
scthakur wrote:
I will go for B.

C and D are out because of "it". E is out because of "just as".


Why is It wrong in answer choice D, it clearly refers to natural phenomena
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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2013, 21:25
tejastalak wrote:
scthakur wrote:
I will go for B.

C and D are out because of "it". E is out because of "just as".


Why is It wrong in answer choice D, it clearly refers to natural phenomena


Issue in D is subject verb agreement. Phenomena (plural) would appear to X as IT would to Y. Additionally, I feel that the comma is unnecessary.
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Re: Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as [#permalink] New post 27 Feb 2013, 06:41
Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as manifestations of the laws of physics, would appear the same to someone on the deck of a ship moving smoothly and uniformly through the water as a person standing on land.

A. water as a

B. water as to a

C. water; just as it would to

D. water, as it would to the

E. water; just as to the

Correct idiom: Same to X as to Y.
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Re: Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2013, 02:27
In C and D "it" refers to natural phenomena or what is it referring to?
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Re: Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2013, 02:56
I chose B.

The structure of the sentence is essentially, "appear the same to X as to Y".

fozzzy wrote:
In C and D "it" refers to natural phenomena or what is it referring to?


It does indeed refer to the natural phenomenon. But the usage is redundant. You can very well say the same thing using the idiomatic expression same to X as to Y.
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Re: Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2013, 20:48
This question tested Idioms and Intended Meaning in the sentence.

Option A: Changes the intended meaning of the sentence.

Option B: The correct Usage

Option C: You do not need a semi colon usage as it is straight forward Comparison between two people on different lands watching the same scenario

Option D: The article 'the' changes the meaning of the sentence.

Option E: Same as option C.

Hence the correct answer is B.

As per eGmat rules, always focus on the intended meaning of the sentence.

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Re: Galileo [#permalink] New post 26 Dec 2013, 10:08
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stoy4o wrote:
tejastalak wrote:
scthakur wrote:
I will go for B.

C and D are out because of "it". E is out because of "just as".


Why is It wrong in answer choice D, it clearly refers to natural phenomena


Issue in D is subject verb agreement. Phenomena (plural) would appear to X as IT would to Y. Additionally, I feel that the comma is unnecessary.



Also in (D) - "water, as it would to the"

--the THE is a bit too specific when generally defining a law of physics. So the meaning is a bit too specific when using THE -- really you should be using A.

So in addition to the IT issue, we also have a THE issue. The presence of the word TO is correct, but the other issues make (D) wrong.

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Re: Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as [#permalink] New post 15 Mar 2014, 05:55
Hi Experts,

This is my understanding of the meaning of the sentence:
galileo was convinced that natural phenomenon like the manifestations of laws of physics would appear same to someone sailing on the boat as to a person standing on the land.


Galileo was convinced
- that natural phenomenon, as manisfestations of the laws of physics, would appear same to someone...ship moving smoothly and uniformly through the water as to a person standing on the land

I have highlighted subj-verb pairs in italics and parallel markers in bold.

I want to know what is the role of 'as' in 'natural phenomena, as manifestations of the laws of physics' ? Is it describing the role or is used for comparison ?
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Re: Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as [#permalink] New post 15 Mar 2014, 06:22
freakygeek wrote:
Hi Experts,

This is my understanding of the meaning of the sentence:
galileo was convinced that natural phenomenon like the manifestations of laws of physics would appear same to someone sailing on the boat as to a person standing on the land.


Galileo was convinced
- that natural phenomenon, as manisfestations of the laws of physics, would appear same to someone...ship moving smoothly and uniformly through the water as to a person standing on the land

I have highlighted subj-verb pairs in italics and parallel markers in bold.

I want to know what is the role of 'as' in 'natural phenomena, as manifestations of the laws of physics' ? Is it describing the role or is used for comparison ?


I think .."AS" shows here similarilty..

galileo was convinced that natural phenomenon apprear....same to someone......AS to...
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Re: Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as [#permalink] New post 15 Mar 2014, 11:18
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freakygeek wrote:
Hi Experts,

This is my understanding of the meaning of the sentence:
galileo was convinced that natural phenomenon like the manifestations of laws of physics would appear same to someone sailing on the boat as to a person standing on the land.


Galileo was convinced
- that natural phenomenon, as manisfestations of the laws of physics, would appear same to someone...ship moving smoothly and uniformly through the water as to a person standing on the land

I have highlighted subj-verb pairs in italics and parallel markers in bold.

I want to know what is the role of 'as' in 'natural phenomena, as manifestations of the laws of physics' ? Is it describing the role or is used for comparison ?


Hi there,

Thank you for posting your question here.

"As" in this context doesn't show a role or a function, but presents a comparison. Note that in our concept file on "as", we include an explanation about the use of ellipsis. The part after "as" in this sentence is actually a clause, but the subject and verb have been left out because the comparison is logically clear without them. Without ellipsis, this is what the sentence would look like:

Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as manifestations of the laws of physics, would appear the same to someone on the deck of a ship moving smoothly and uniformly through the water as NATURAL PHENOMENA WOULD APPEAR to a person standing on land.


We don't need to repeat "natural phenomena would appear", because it's clear from the sentence that the comparison is between how natural phenomena would appear to someone on the deck of a ship and how they would appear to someone standing on land.

It's extremely interesting to see how option A incorrectly tries to use ellipsis. Without "to", the comparison becomes ambiguous. Now the comparison could mean either of the following:

1. Natural phenomena would appear the same to someone on the deck of a ship as natural phenomena would appear to a person standing on land. (Comparison between natural phenomena and natural phenomena)
2. Natural phenomena would appear the same to someone on the deck of a ship as a person standing on land would appear. (Comparison between natural phenomena and a person standing on land)

As you can tell, the second comparison is completely illogical. To clarify the meaning of the sentence and leave no ambiguity, "to" is necessary even when ellipsis is applied to this sentence.

I hope this helps to clarify your doubt!

Regards,
Meghna
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Re: Galileo was convinced that natural phenomena, as   [#permalink] 15 Mar 2014, 11:18
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