Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 02 Sep 2014, 09:41

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Globe trade winds, such as those that blow around the Horn

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 12 Oct 2008
Posts: 558
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 60 [0], given: 2

GMAT Tests User
Globe trade winds, such as those that blow around the Horn [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2009, 17:53
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
Globe trade winds, such as those that blow around the Horn of Africa, tend to unexpectedly shift direction once every five years. The force of the shift in direction, and/or its accompanying change in air pressure, is strong enough to force a commercial airline jet into a downward spiral if the pilots are not prepared for it. The response of computer-controlled detection systems on commercial jet liners to unexpected changes in air pressure and direction stemming from severe weather conditions is not entirely predictable.

Which of the following can most reasonably be concluded, if the statements above are true, about computer-controlled detection systems on board commercial jets?

(A) Sometime in the next five years a plane will crash as a result of an inappropriate response to changes in air pressure or direction.
(B) A detection system’s response to a change in air pressure or direction during a severe storm may by not be entirely accurate, unless a back-up system was included for this problem.
(C) It would be impossible for the system to distinguish changes in air pressure and direction resulting from two different types of severe weather conditions.
(D) Detection system responses depend on where in the world the changes in air pressure or direction occur.
(E) The only way a plane can avoid going into a downward spiral when air pressure or direction suddenly changes is if the detection system identifies changes early enough so that the pilots have time to react.

Does anybody know OA for this.....I am not convinced with the one which I got. will post OA later
Kaplan Promo CodeKnewton GMAT Discount CodesVeritas Prep GMAT Discount Codes
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Aug 2007
Posts: 735
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 99 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2009, 18:14
IMO, only contenders are B and E.
I will go for E. Back up plan in B seems out of scope to me.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 17 Dec 2008
Posts: 179
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 0

Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2009, 19:00
Globe trade winds, such as those that blow around the Horn of Africa, tend to unexpectedly shift direction once every five years. The force of the shift in direction, and/or its accompanying change in air pressure, is strong enough to force a commercial airline jet into a downward spiral if the pilots are not prepared for it. The response of computer-controlled detection systems on commercial jet liners to unexpected changes in air pressure and direction stemming from severe weather conditions is not entirely predictable.

Which of the following can most reasonably be concluded, if the statements above are true, about computer-controlled detection systems on board commercial jets?

(A) Sometime in the next five years a plane will crash as a result of an inappropriate response to changes in air pressure or direction.
(B) A detection system’s response to a change in air pressure or direction during a severe storm may by not be entirely accurate, unless a back-up system was included for this problem.
[Hold]
(C) It would be impossible for the system to distinguish changes in air pressure and direction resulting from two different types of severe weather conditions.
(D) Detection system responses depend on where in the world the changes in air pressure or direction occur.

(E) The only way a plane can avoid going into a downward spiral when air pressure or direction suddenly changes is if the detection system identifies changes early enough so that the pilots have time to react.
[Hold]

B has one issue.
B - talks about back up system.
E - looks clearer.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 428
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 70 [0], given: 14

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2009, 21:04
reply2spg wrote:
Globe trade winds, such as those that blow around the Horn of Africa, tend to unexpectedly shift direction once every five years. The force of the shift in direction, and/or its accompanying change in air pressure, is strong enough to force a commercial airline jet into a downward spiral if the pilots are not prepared for it. The response of computer-controlled detection systems on commercial jet liners to unexpected changes in air pressure and direction stemming from severe weather conditions is not entirely predictable.

Which of the following can most reasonably be concluded, if the statements above are true, about computer-controlled detection systems on board commercial jets?

(A) Sometime in the next five years a plane will crash as a result of an inappropriate response to changes in air pressure or direction.
(B) A detection system’s response to a change in air pressure or direction during a severe storm may by not be entirely accurate, unless a back-up system was included for this problem.
(C) It would be impossible for the system to distinguish changes in air pressure and direction resulting from two different types of severe weather conditions.
(D) Detection system responses depend on where in the world the changes in air pressure or direction occur.
(E) The only way a plane can avoid going into a downward spiral when air pressure or direction suddenly changes is if the detection system identifies changes early enough so that the pilots have time to react.

Does anybody know OA for this.....I am not convinced with the one which I got. will post OA later


I think it's C..
Since the computer controlled detection systems cannot entirely predit severe weather conditions. so in this case when there are two different type of weather conditions the system might get confused and the predictability would be low or in fact may be even wrong
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 26 May 2008
Posts: 432
Schools: Kellogg Class of 2012
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 57 [0], given: 4

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 18 Feb 2009, 08:25
E looks OK to me

B is close but the thing about back-up is unwarranted

Cheers,
Unplugged
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2008
Posts: 1436
Followers: 33

Kudos [?]: 214 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 18 Feb 2009, 08:48
reply2spg wrote:
Globe trade winds, such as those that blow around the Horn of Africa, tend to unexpectedly shift direction once every five years. The force of the shift in direction, and/or its accompanying change in air pressure, is strong enough to force a commercial airline jet into a downward spiral if the pilots are not prepared for it. The response of computer-controlled detection systems on commercial jet liners to unexpected changes in air pressure and direction stemming from severe weather conditions is not entirely predictable.

Which of the following can most reasonably be concluded, if the statements above are true, about computer-controlled detection systems on board commercial jets?

(A) Sometime in the next five years a plane will crash as a result of an inappropriate response to changes in air pressure or direction. not about the CCDS, about plane
(B) A detection system’s response to a change in air pressure or direction during a severe storm may by not be entirely accurate, unless a back-up system was included for this problem. as some one said, this out of scope and unwarranted
(C) It would be impossible for the system to distinguish changes in air pressure and direction resulting from two different types of severe weather conditions.
(D) Detection system responses depend on where in the world the changes in air pressure or direction occur.
(E) The only way a plane can avoid going into a downward spiral when air pressure or direction suddenly changes is if the detection system identifies changes early enough so that the pilots have time to react.

The problem with E is CCDS have accuracy problem and not latency issues. The latency stated in the stimulus is for the pilots who might have set the flight to auto pilot :(

Does anybody know OA for this.....I am not convinced with the one which I got. will post OA later


Reluctantly Chose C even though I hate impossible. The only reason is because it focuses on the accuracy of CCDS
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 30 May 2009
Posts: 81
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 2

Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 30 May 2009, 14:02
i feel the ans is B as the question asks for a conclusion abt computer controlled system and not abt an air plane as it is mentioned in E.

also, the choice C states 2 severe weather conditions, wic is not quoted anywhr in the argument.

so ans should b B.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 08 Feb 2009
Posts: 147
Schools: Anderson
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 3

Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 30 May 2009, 15:22
IMO the answer is E.

The stimulus has a reasonably broad scope, which is understood by "not entirely"...

C - ruled out because of its narrow scope. Stimulus does leave a little scope for the possibility that CCDS works correctly in severe weather conditions.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 May 2009
Posts: 15
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 30 May 2009, 21:31
My choice is B..

B does not talk about any other specific system so it is still in the scope..
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 24 May 2009
Posts: 108
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2009, 04:02
It's E clearly
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 05 Jun 2009
Posts: 852
WE 1: 7years (Financial Services - Consultant, BA)
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 181 [0], given: 106

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Global winds [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2009, 08:39
Definitely E..

OA plz?

---
(1:45)
_________________

Consider kudos for the good post ... :beer
My debrief : journey-670-to-720-q50-v36-long-85083.html

Re: CR: Global winds   [#permalink] 08 Jun 2009, 08:39
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic The winds that howl across the Great Plains not only blow tcsing 4 19 Jan 2013, 22:55
1 In a blow to those who still harbored the illusion that sondenso 4 27 May 2008, 19:35
wind energy Amardeep Sharma 4 26 Nov 2007, 17:01
The winds that howl across the Great Plains not only blow bmwhype2 4 21 Jun 2007, 09:41
In a blow to those who still harbored the illusion that imaru 14 06 Dec 2006, 09:23
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Globe trade winds, such as those that blow around the Horn

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.