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GMAT Backfired. In Big Trouble. Need Help!

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GMAT Backfired. In Big Trouble. Need Help! [#permalink] New post 30 Jul 2009, 07:03
Hi Guys,

I am writing this post because I am in a really situation and i really need some advice n suggestion.

After working for 3 years as Techie got fed up and I felt the need to complete my MBA to redirect my career and to bring my career on a faster track. I took GMAT in early Sept last year and scored 570 (V:21; Q:47; A:5). I had studied for 3 months (1.5 hrs Monday to Saturday and 8 hrs Sunday). I couldn't study for entire last two weeks becasue of work pressure. Insted of rescheduling my test i lowered my expected GMAT score to 620 because i knew i might not get a second chance to retake GMAT provided the hectic work conditions. Based on my test scores and considering the fact that I didnt study the last two weeks before my exam I was expecting to see atleast 620 on the real GMAT. After completing the test when i saw 570 score on the screen i got very disappointed and annoyed. After that in March because of some family emergency i had to consider quitting my job (My leave request was turned down, I was spending time from 6:30 am to 10:00 pm almost everyday for work).
Considering that there was a family emergency along with my ambition to complete my MBA i decided to quit my job, take care of the all the long pending Issues and retake my GMAT.

I started preparing for GMAT again. I took all my practice test mimicing the real test conditions. This time I was scoring consistently in 600s on my practice tests: 650 PRINCETON, around 660 on MGMAT (3 TESTS) and 600 in KAPLAN(4 TESTS).

I took the test last week and to my surprise i got 500 in the second attempt. I was really surprised and was extremly disappointed. I applied all strategies as i had in the practice tests but still i dont know what went so wrong that i got 500 (V:17; Q:42; A:4.5). I did not miss a single question on the test. I just dont know what happened. :(

Now the situation is even worse: got 570 on GMAT in first attempt, 500 in second attempt and gap of 4 months in Exp.

I have started applying for a second job. Will this gap have negative impact on my application to universities?

Guys, I know overall i am in a bad situation but I really want to complete my MBA from a resonably good University. Pls advice/ suggest what to do. I really need your help.
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Re: GMAT Backfired. In Big Trouble. Need Help! [#permalink] New post 30 Jul 2009, 07:38
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I don't think you're in big trouble, but I hear a lot of distress in what you're saying. I'm not a lawyer, a psychiatrist or anything else on television--I'm just giving you my 2 cents without much in the way of critical context.

That said, it seems like you need to back up, take some of the pressure off of yourself, and get your personal situation stabilized a bit more. Once you do that, it sounds like you'd be in a lot better place to figure out if an MBA is going to meet your expectations and if you want to and feel up to improving your GMAT score.

In terms of number of retakes, I'm not sure how much this matters. I don't think you want to spend your life retaking the GMAT, but if you want to give it another shot and can devote the time and effort effectively, then why not. Follow your dreams.

At the same time, I think it bears mentioning that no single degree is guaranteed to patch up anyone's career progression. Sure, you go to HBS, maybe everyone there graduates and has an amazing career (actually, there's the disgruntled guy who wrote that book I can't remember the name of -- so we've already disproven that notion). I think for most people it can definitely improve their progression--that's why we're all here right? But there aren't guarantees and some people probably get an MBA and regret it. My wife probably regrets her JD.

Which is all to say, it sounds like you're putting an inordinate amount of pressure on yourself and moving with a bit of desperation. Careers take decades and sometimes people take years to get theirs where they want it to be--unless you're as old as me, I'd wager you have time. :)

So get a new job, get started off on the right foot, get comfortable and then think about attacking the GMAT and application. You have a lot of opportunity to improve on verbal, right? If you want to take a break but still work verbal, start reading some well-written English-language authors (Martin Amis blows me away) or The Economist. At some point when you're ready, start chipping away at your verbal. Plan for more time than you think you'll need to keep the pressure off--remember; it's a race not a sprint and you have time.

I don't think just trying to barrel through and move your score up to 620 is going to help you--you still have to deal with the application, interviews and school, and I think you need to have some peace of mind and confidence to do all these things to the best of your ability.

Anyway, I'll get down off my soapbox now :) Best of luck.
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Re: GMAT Backfired. In Big Trouble. Need Help! [#permalink] New post 30 Jul 2009, 09:13
Makes great sense what you said. I would say take it again and get close to 700. Work on the story for grad school and hope for the best
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Re: GMAT Backfired. In Big Trouble. Need Help! [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2009, 11:50
scorcho wrote:
I don't think you're in big trouble, but I hear a lot of distress in what you're saying. I'm not a lawyer, a psychiatrist or anything else on television--I'm just giving you my 2 cents without much in the way of critical context.

That said, it seems like you need to back up, take some of the pressure off of yourself, and get your personal situation stabilized a bit more. Once you do that, it sounds like you'd be in a lot better place to figure out if an MBA is going to meet your expectations and if you want to and feel up to improving your GMAT score.

In terms of number of retakes, I'm not sure how much this matters. I don't think you want to spend your life retaking the GMAT, but if you want to give it another shot and can devote the time and effort effectively, then why not. Follow your dreams.

At the same time, I think it bears mentioning that no single degree is guaranteed to patch up anyone's career progression. Sure, you go to HBS, maybe everyone there graduates and has an amazing career (actually, there's the disgruntled guy who wrote that book I can't remember the name of -- so we've already disproven that notion). I think for most people it can definitely improve their progression--that's why we're all here right? But there aren't guarantees and some people probably get an MBA and regret it. My wife probably regrets her JD.

Which is all to say, it sounds like you're putting an inordinate amount of pressure on yourself and moving with a bit of desperation. Careers take decades and sometimes people take years to get theirs where they want it to be--unless you're as old as me, I'd wager you have time. :)

So get a new job, get started off on the right foot, get comfortable and then think about attacking the GMAT and application. You have a lot of opportunity to improve on verbal, right? If you want to take a break but still work verbal, start reading some well-written English-language authors (Martin Amis blows me away) or The Economist. At some point when you're ready, start chipping away at your verbal. Plan for more time than you think you'll need to keep the pressure off--remember; it's a race not a sprint and you have time.

I don't think just trying to barrel through and move your score up to 620 is going to help you--you still have to deal with the application, interviews and school, and I think you need to have some peace of mind and confidence to do all these things to the best of your ability.

Anyway, I'll get down off my soapbox now :) Best of luck.

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Re: GMAT Backfired. In Big Trouble. Need Help! [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2009, 12:46
zuperman wrote:
scorcho wrote:
I don't think you're in big trouble, but I hear a lot of distress in what you're saying. I'm not a lawyer, a psychiatrist or anything else on television--I'm just giving you my 2 cents without much in the way of critical context.

That said, it seems like you need to back up, take some of the pressure off of yourself, and get your personal situation stabilized a bit more. Once you do that, it sounds like you'd be in a lot better place to figure out if an MBA is going to meet your expectations and if you want to and feel up to improving your GMAT score.

In terms of number of retakes, I'm not sure how much this matters. I don't think you want to spend your life retaking the GMAT, but if you want to give it another shot and can devote the time and effort effectively, then why not. Follow your dreams.

At the same time, I think it bears mentioning that no single degree is guaranteed to patch up anyone's career progression. Sure, you go to HBS, maybe everyone there graduates and has an amazing career (actually, there's the disgruntled guy who wrote that book I can't remember the name of -- so we've already disproven that notion). I think for most people it can definitely improve their progression--that's why we're all here right? But there aren't guarantees and some people probably get an MBA and regret it. My wife probably regrets her JD.

Which is all to say, it sounds like you're putting an inordinate amount of pressure on yourself and moving with a bit of desperation. Careers take decades and sometimes people take years to get theirs where they want it to be--unless you're as old as me, I'd wager you have time. :)

So get a new job, get started off on the right foot, get comfortable and then think about attacking the GMAT and application. You have a lot of opportunity to improve on verbal, right? If you want to take a break but still work verbal, start reading some well-written English-language authors (Martin Amis blows me away) or The Economist. At some point when you're ready, start chipping away at your verbal. Plan for more time than you think you'll need to keep the pressure off--remember; it's a race not a sprint and you have time.

I don't think just trying to barrel through and move your score up to 620 is going to help you--you still have to deal with the application, interviews and school, and I think you need to have some peace of mind and confidence to do all these things to the best of your ability.

Anyway, I'll get down off my soapbox now :) Best of luck.

Top post sir


I second that. You just need to relax a bit and find a job. Pressure of GMAT and joblessness is killing you and with this feeling you would make things worse. Take some pressure off your back and take things one by one. I am sure you gonna succeed, it might have been your off day when you scored 500. Just give your best again when you find some peace of mind.
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Re: GMAT Backfired. In Big Trouble. Need Help! [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2009, 06:22
sorry to hear. I was in the same boat. My first try was 610, then I decided to retake. Was getting ready for 4 months full-time. Scored in upper 600's - lower 700's in all prep tests. And bam - 540. Total bs. And you can not do anything. Pearsons VUE is just another corporation with call center in India. I just wanted to see what went wrong, because I was getting tough questions and felt very strong. It was worse than dealing w dell :evil: Anyway, my school looked at the highest score and i got admitted anyway. But oh, boy I was mad. And still am for the way they administer this exam.
Re: GMAT Backfired. In Big Trouble. Need Help!   [#permalink] 04 Aug 2009, 06:22
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