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GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs

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GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2010, 09:22

ADJECTIVES AND ADVERBS


This post is a part of [GMAT GRAMMAR BOOK]

created by: bb
edited by: dzyubam


Adjectives


Adjectives are used to describe, or modify, nouns. They give additional descriptive information to a noun: hungry child, beautiful flowers, French doors, old man.

An adjective is considered neither singular nor plural. A final plural –s is never added to an adjective.
I saw some beautiful models at the show. NOT: I saw some beautifuls models at the show.

Adjectives only modify nouns, pronouns and linking verbs (see this page for more information on linking verbs). Adjectives normally come before the nouns they modify, or follow linking verbs. If more than one adjective is used, a comma is placed between to separate them.

The giant, green (Adjectives) monster (noun) chased the tiny, frightened (adjectives) astronauts (noun).

Adjectives that modify a singular countable noun are usually preceded by a, an, or the which is determined by the vowel sound of the adjective, not the noun.

a delicious apple an ugly duckling the scary story

Adverbs


Adverbs are used to describe, or modify, verbs (except linking verbs), adjectives, or other adverbs.

Adverbs are often formed by adding –ly to an adjective.

Adjective: rapid Adverb: rapidly

Adverbs are often used to modify, give additional information to, adjectives.

She is extremely (adjective) nervous (adjective).

The following words are also adverbs: almost, fast, often, so, too, well. An adverb can be identified because it answers the question: How?

She is extremely nervous. (How nervous is she?)
We almost won. (How did we win?)
The bird flew fast. (How did the bird fly?)
Steven eats too much candy. (How much candy does Steven eat?)
Stacy plays violin well. (How does Stacy play violin?)

Adverbs can be placed in several positions, depending on the sentence.

• Adverbs are often placed at the beginning of a sentence. It is followed by a comma in this instance.

Usually, the girls go to the mall on the weekend.

• Adverbs can also be placed at the end of a sentence.

The girls go to the mall on the weekend usually.

• Adverbs can be placed before simple present and simple past verbs (except be).

The girls usually go to the mall on the weekend.
The girls usually went to the mall on the weekend.

• Adverbs follow the verb be in its simple and past forms.

Joan is normally in the competition. Cows were frequently in the field.

• Adverbs are placed between an auxiliary verb and a main verb.

He has always gone to work early.

• In a question, an adverb is placed directly after the subject.

Does the bus always come on time?


Exercise 18: Using Adjectives and Adverbs


Underline the correct adjective or adverb in parentheses. Then write AJ for adjective, or AV for adverb, in the blank at the end of the sentence to determine in what capacity the chosen word is used.

Example: He likes (sad, sadly) movies. __AJ__

1. They sing (good, well). _______
2. Ellen’s chocolate cake is (delicious, deliciously). _______
3. The students speak (fluent, fluently) English. _______
4. The students speak English (fluent, fluently). _______
5. This is an (awesome, awesomely) painting. _______
6. The lady at the opera sang (beautiful, beautifully). _______
7. (Incredible, Incredibly), the baby survived the plane crash. _______
8. That is a (considerable, considerably) fee to enter the game. _______
9. The fee is (considerable, considerably) more than I expected. _______
10. He needs to swim (fast, fastly) in order to beat the champion. _______




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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 03:06
I have a doubt In Exercise 18 question no 10:

He needs to swim(fast/fastly) in order to beat the champion.

I thin swim is a linking verb in this sentence connecting the adjective fast to swim, therefore He needs to swim fast in order to beat the champion is right. Is that right or wrong?
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 23 Jan 2011, 11:59
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Typo -
Text from the pdf version I downloaded a few days back
I saw some beautiful models at the show. NOT: I saw some eautiful models at the show.

vs the version on this page
I saw some beautiful models at the show. NOT: I saw some beautifuls models at the show.
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2011, 18:05
neo123 wrote:
I have a doubt In Exercise 18 question no 10:

He needs to swim(fast/fastly) in order to beat the champion.

I thin swim is a linking verb in this sentence connecting the adjective fast to swim, therefore He needs to swim fast in order to beat the champion is right. Is that right or wrong?


I agree. He need to swim fast in order to beat the champion. This sounds correct to me.

Could anyone please explain?
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2011, 18:07
3. The students speak (fluent, fluently) English. _______

Answer to this question is:

The students speak fluent English. Isn't fluent being used as an adverb over here?

How do students speak? fluent. In the answer choice it is identified as Adjective.
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2011, 05:56
I also agree that point 10. He needs to swim (fast, fastly) in order to beat the champion. _______ should have fast instaed of fastly. Also fast here is an adverb. Kinldy confirm.
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2011, 20:03
Expert's post
Eshika is correct--fast is used as an adverb in this sentence. "Fast" is a somewhat irregular word, in that it can be used as an adjective or an adverb. "Fastly" is not a word.

As for the fluent English, "fluent" is correct. In its position preceding "English," fluent is an adjective. It means that the students' English usage is fluent. If we put it after "English," we would want to make it an adverb. "The students speak English fluently." This would mean that they speak English in a fluent manner.

I hope this helps!
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 15 Jan 2012, 04:02
Thanks!
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 15 Jan 2012, 04:04
I am getting 13/15 consistently in SC...
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 15 Jan 2012, 04:05
working hard to make it 15/15 ..any inputs how to make it...
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs [#permalink] New post 15 Jan 2012, 04:06
There is no particlular sequence or sets where im going wrong...
Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Adjectives and Adverbs   [#permalink] 15 Jan 2012, 04:06
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