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GMAT Grammar Book: Causative Verbs

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GMAT Grammar Book: Causative Verbs [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2010, 14:29

Causative Verbs


This post is a part of [GMAT GRAMMAR BOOK]

created by: bb
edited by: dzyubam

Causative verbs are used to indicate that one person causes another person to do something for them. The true causative verbs are: have, get and make. NOTE: Causative verbs are normally used with people, although things can sometimes be “made to do something” also.

Have / Get


The clause following have or get can be either active or passive. Study the following examples. (See more information on passive voice on [highlight]page ____[/highlight].)

Active Have
subject + have + complement + verb in simple form . . .


I had my brother feed the dog all week. (My brother fed the dog.)

Active Get
subject + get + complement + verb in infinitive . . .


I got my brother to feed the dog all week. (My brother fed the dog.)

PASSIVE Have/Get
subject + have OR get + complement + verb in past participle . . .


I had the dog fed. OR I got the dog fed. (The dog was fed by somebody.)

Examples of active causative clauses:

Gary is getting his girlfriend to pick up the dry cleaning.
The president had the reporters wait outside the conference room.
Martha is having her friend help with her assignment.
The doctor got his patient to take the bitter medicine.

Examples of passive causative clauses:

Robert has his stories published each month.
My sister had her dress altered for the wedding by my aunt.
I can’t believe she is getting her hair colored like mine!
My son is having his eyes tested this week.
We all had our heads shaved before the big game.

Make


The causative verb make can only be followed by a clause in the active voice. Make is a much stronger command than have or get and means to force someone to do something.

subject + make + complement + verb in simple form . . .

The judge made me give him my driver’s license.

NOTE: Even though make means the same as force, if force is used then the infinitive of the verb is used.

subject + force + complement + verb in simple form . . .


The judge forced me to give him my driver’s license.

Examples of sentences using the causative verb make:

My boss makes me finish the daily report each day before I go home.
I made my little sister give me half of her candy.
Our teacher is making us bring our homework to him tomorrow.
Ralph had made us promise not to tell what he did before he entered the forbidden zone.

Let / Help – Verbs often considered Causative


Let and help are often considered to be causative verbs, but they are actually not. These words request permission or assistance from another person.

Let means allow or permit. When let is used, the simple form of the verb is used with it.

subject + let + complement + verb in simple form . . .


However, if allow or permit is used then the infinitive of the verb must be used with them.

subject + allow OR permit + complement + verb in infinitive form . . .


Examples:

Mark’s dad let him play in the baseball game.
Mark’s dad allowed him to play in the baseball game.
Mark’s dad permitted him to play in the baseball game.

My boss let me leave early from work.
They are going to let me enter the ancient text archives to do research.
Jamie always lets her kids have slumber parties on the weekends.
Ralph is letting his son go to the concert.

Help, which means assist, is also usually followed by the simple form of the verb, but can be followed by the infinitive in some cases.

subject + help + complement + verb in simple form OR verb in infinitive form


Examples:

Lisa helped her mom fold the clothes.
The librarian helped me find the reference book I needed.
Her stories always help him to sleep better.

Exercise 26: Using Causative Verbs


Fill in the blank with the correct form of the verb in parentheses in the following sentences.

1. Johnny’s mom made him ____________________ (clean) his room.
2. I am having the seamstress ____________________ (alter) my dress.
3. My parents got me _____________________ (visit) my aunt before leaving town.
4. Our boss let us _____________________ (leave) the meeting early.
5. We should help Jennifer _____________________ (study) for her final exam.
6. They will have to get the judge ____________________ (sign) the form before they can proceed.
7. The Johnson’s always have us ____________________ (feed) their dog for them during their summer vacation.
8. Ralph is getting Julia ____________________ (write) his essay for him.
9. The dog made the cat ____________________ (climb) the tree quickly.
10. I got the mechanic ____________________ (fix) my car before he went to lunch.




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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Causative Verbs [#permalink] New post 08 Sep 2010, 12:05
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dzyubam wrote:
However, if allow or permit is used then the infinitive of the verb must be used with them.

subject + allow OR permit + complement + verb in simple form . . .



pls correct the above rule (simple should be infinitive in the second sentece ;-)
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Causative Verbs [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 01:35
thank you! +1
zisis wrote:
dzyubam wrote:
However, if allow or permit is used then the infinitive of the verb must be used with them.

subject + allow OR permit + complement + verb in simple form . . .



pls correct the above rule (simple should be infinitive in the second sentece ;-)

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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Causative Verbs [#permalink] New post 14 Apr 2011, 07:15
clean
alter
to visit
leave
to study
sign
feed
to write
climb
to fix
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Causative Verbs   [#permalink] 14 Apr 2011, 07:15
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