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GMAT Grammar Book: Proper Use of Problem Words

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GMAT Grammar Book: Proper Use of Problem Words [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2010, 03:49

PROPER USE OF PROBLEM VERBS


This post is a part of [GMAT GRAMMAR BOOK]

created by: bb
edited by: dzyubam

It can be quite confusing to distinguish which correct verb to use when it comes to raise/rise, set/sit, or lay/lie. Raise, set and lay are transitive verbs and are followed by an object. Rise, sit and lie are intransitive verbs and are NOT followed by an object. NOTE: Even native speakers often misuse lay and lie.

Study the chart below to understand the correct conjugation and use of these verbs.


TRANSITIVEINTRANSATIVE
raise, raised, raised
Tony raised his hand (object).

set, set, set
Julie set the book (object) on my desk.

lay, laid, laid
Julie is laying the book (object) on my desk.
rise, rose, risen
Tony rises early.

sit, sat, sat
I sit in the third row.

lie, lay, lain
John is lying on the floor. (Notice the changed spelling of lie when “ing” is added.)

NOTE: The verb lie, which means “not to tell the truth”, is a regular verb:

lie, lied, lied
Ruth lied to me about her age.

Exercise 13: Using Raise/Rise, Set/Sit and Lay/Lie


Underline the correct word in parentheses in the following sentences.

1. Hens (lay, lie) eggs.
2. Janice (set, sat) the table for dinner.
3. Janice (set, sat) at the table for dinner.
4. Mrs. Smith (raises, rises) a garden every year.
5. I (laid, lay) my wallet on top of the dresser.
6. The ability to succeed (lies, lays) within you.
7. The old lady (set, sat) on the bench because she was tired.
8. Hot air (raises, rises).
9. When I get tired, I (lay, lie) down and take a nap.
10. Jennifer (raised, rose) from her seat to pick up her test paper.



Think something is missing? Let us know - Help Improve GMAT Club's Grammar Book Project!
This post is a part of [GMAT GRAMMAR BOOK]
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Proper Use of Problem Words [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2010, 13:55
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another way to describe the two categories is:

- transitive = action on other(s)
- intransitive = action on self
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Proper Use of Problem Words [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2010, 14:12
Expert's post
zisis wrote:
another way to describe the two categories is:

- transitive = action on other(s)
- intransitive = action on self



Seems to work.... and is a good way to remember
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Proper Use of Problem Words [#permalink] New post 08 Sep 2010, 06:42
zisis wrote:
another way to describe the two categories is:

- transitive = action on other(s)
- intransitive = action on self


Yes, great addon by zisis. Thanks
Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Proper Use of Problem Words   [#permalink] 08 Sep 2010, 06:42
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