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GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes

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GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2010, 21:54
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Hello,

I am a newbie to GMAT preparation and planning to take GMAT in the next couple of months or so.

Below are the few points on the Subject-Verb agreement that might be useful ...

***

(1) When subjects are connected by or/nor, the subject closer to verb determines the number of the verb
(2) Some of the votes seem to have been miscounted
Here some is the subject. But votes make it countable. So we need plural verb
(3) Everyone seems to be a plural word, but it is always singular
(4) The subject is not compounded by phrases such as along with, together with, and as well as
(5) The subject comes after the verb in constructions that begin with here or there
(6) Three-quarters of the students represents a countable number.
(7) Three-quarters of the student body represents a lump sum, a singular entity.
(8) A high percentage of the population: is singular
(9) A high percentage of the people: is plural
Rule: With words that indicate portions – percent, fraction, part, majority, some, all, none, remainder, and so forth – look at the noun in your of phrase (Object of the preposition) to determine whether to use a singular or plural verb. If the object of the preposition is singular, use a singular verb. If the object of the preposition is a plural verb, use a plural verb.
Example: Fifty percent of the pie has disappeared
A high percentage of the population is …, A high percentage of the people are …
(10) None is singular or plural? – Not sure, better think of it as Plural.
(11) When either/ neither are subjects, they always take singular verb
(12) Use singular verb with sums of money or periods of time
Ex: Ten dollars is a high price to pay, Five years is the maximum sentence for that offense.
(13) Sometimes the pronoun who, that, or which is the subject of a verb in the middle of the sentence. The pronouns who, that, and which become singular or plural according to the noun directly in front of them. So, if that noun is singular, use a singular verb. If it is plural, use a plural verb.
Examples: Salma is the scientist who writes/write the reports.
The word in front of who is scientist, which is singular. Therefore, use the singular verb writes.
He is one of the men who does/do the work.
The word in front of who is men, which is plural. Therefore, use the plural verb do.

(14) Collective nouns: depends on the usage. Ex: team, staff
Usage: The staff is in meeting, The staff are in disagreement about the findings.
(15) Indefinite pronouns: All/ Some. Singular/Plural depends on what they are referring to. i.e, is the thing referring to countable or not.
(16) Indefinite pronouns: Everyone, Everybody, Each require singular verb.
(17) Words joined to a singular subject by with, as well as, along with are parenthetical. The verb should be put in the singular.
(18) The words there and here are never subjects.
(19) Either, neither, each, everyone, many a must be followed by a singular verb
(20) Two nouns qualified by each or every, even though connected by and, require a singular verb.
(21) Looks plural but singular – News, politics, wages, mathematics
(22) Looks singular but plural – dozen cost
(23) Singular verbs needed for – The Arabian Nights, The United States
(24) If the nouns suggest one idea to the mind, or refer to the same person or thing, the verb is singular
Example: bread and butter is; time and tide waits for no man; the novelist and poet is dead

***
Please feel free to add/correct if anything needed.

Cheers!
Ravi
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 22 Jul 2010, 09:33
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I am glad that you liked.

How about giving me +1 kudos :-)

Cheers!
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2010, 10:49
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None is used with either a plural count or non-count noun. It CANNOT be used with a single count noun. The verb form will depend on the noun used.

None of the girls have played soccer before. plural count noun = girls
None of the water has leaked into the basement. Non-count noun = water

gmat-grammar-book-negation-part-i-using-not-98103.html

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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2010, 11:04
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None is used with either a plural count or non-count noun. It CANNOT be used with a single count noun - correct
I never said it can be used with a single count noun. And even I have used it with plural count noun(boys).
Regarding the verb form which should be used with None, I have posted whatever I found in GMAT Flashcard - Snippet is as follows
“None, No one”
“None” should be singular, even when to your ear it
seems as though it should be plural.
CORRECT: “None of the boys enjoys camping as he does.”
“No one” is always singular.
CORRECT: “No one enjoys camping as much as he does.”


Could be wrong.....Would request other members to pitch in to clarify the same.
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2010, 04:02
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(6) Three-quarters of the students represents a countable number.
(7) Three-quarters of the student body represents a lump sum, a singular entity

How do these compare to the rule on percents/fractions that says look in the prepositional phrase to find if its plural/single?

I'm not quite sure what these rules mean, can someone please explain?

Thanks

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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2010, 04:32
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When a percentage or a part of something is mentioned with plural meaning the plural verb is used.
Examples: 1. 30% of Indian women are literate.
2. 50% of the class is absent.

Also, of the two sentences[(6) & (7)] posted by flgators519, (6) should read as
(6) Three-quarters of the students represent a countable number.

Friends, discussion like this will help us a lot. So, request you all to pitch in to help and get helped :)
Keep posting!!!!
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2010, 20:01
thanks a lot for the great effort
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2010, 10:10
Hi Ravi,

About point no. 10 which is "None is singular or plural? – Not sure, better think of it as Plural", I would like to add that None is singular. The following sentence is correct
“None of the boys enjoys camping as he does.”
Also, No one is always singular.
“No one enjoys camping as much as he does.” - Correct
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2010, 06:07
Where does "Countable" vs "uncountable" subjects come into play?

I've heard some things like uncountable is always singular. Does this come into play with fractions and percents? Or do you always look to the subject for plural/singular?

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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 25 Dec 2010, 09:25
very nice summary :)

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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 25 Dec 2010, 09:53
kissthegmat wrote:
None is used with either a plural count or non-count noun. It CANNOT be used with a single count noun. The verb form will depend on the noun used.

None of the girls have played soccer before. plural count noun = girls
None of the water has leaked into the basement. Non-count noun = water

gmat-grammar-book-negation-part-i-using-not-98103.html


Shouldn't first sentence be as following?

None of the girls has played soccer before = Not one has played soccer before.

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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2011, 18:42
Pretty awesome stuff! Thanks for the help!

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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 18 Jan 2011, 06:21
The soccer example:

None of the girls have played soccer - girls is a plural count noun - hence u need to use have

Not one of the girls has played soccer - Not one is always singular.

No one among the girls has played soccer - No one is always singular.

Hope this helps.
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2011, 10:02
Example on "each"
Although it claims to delve into political issues, television can be superficial such as when each of the three major networks broadcast exactly the same statement from a political candidate.
(A) superficial such as when each of the three major networks -singular noun
(B) superficial, as can sometimes occur if all of the three major networks-plural noun
(C) superficial if the three major networks all-plural noun
(D) superficial whenever each of the three major networks-singular noun
(E) superficial, as when the three major networks each-plural noun


One of the factors
A higher interest rate is only one of the factors, albeit an important one, that keeps the housing market from spiraling out of control, like it did earlier in the decade.
a) that keeps the housing market from spiraling out of control, like it did earlier in the decade.
b) that keep the housing market from spiraling out of control, as it did earlier in the decade
c) that keeps the housing market from spiraling out of control, as it did earlier in the decade
d) that keep the housing market from spiraling out of control, like earlier in the decade
e) that keep the housing market from spiraling out of control, like it did earlier in the decade

one of the factors that + plural verb (that refers back to the closest noun)
one of the factors + singular verb
the one of the factors that + singular verb

Phrase/clause as a subject
The period when the great painted caves at Lascaux and Altamira were occupied by Upper Paleolithic people has been established by carbon-14 dating,but what is much more difficult to determine are the reason for their decoration,the use to which primitive people put the caves,and the meaning of the magnificently depicted animals.
(A) has been established by carbon-14 dating,but what is much more difficult to determine are - 'period' is singular and so we need singular 'has'. Also, 'reason' is singular and so we need 'is'
(B) has been established by carbon-14 dating,but what is much more difficult to determine is - 'period' is singular and so we need singular 'has'. Also, 'reason' is singular and so we need 'is'
(C) have been established by carbon-14 dating,but what is much more difficult to determine is
(D) have been established by carbon-14 dating,but what is much more difficult to determine are
(E) are established by carbon-14 dating,but that which is much more difficult to determine is
“what is much more difficult to determine” is a subject phrase, so it takes a singular verb (is).
-ing subject also takes singular verb
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2011, 10:18
19) "many" goes with plural verb? Can someone verify this?
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2011, 22:45
(14) Collective nouns: depends on the usage. Ex: team, staff
Usage: The staff is in meeting,
The staff are in disagreement about the findings.

I think we have a point here to discuss : Collectively noun almost takes singular form of verb.

The staff is in meeting, staff is correct
The staffs are in disagreement about the findings. staffs are is correct ( not staff are)
So a small correction to your point.

Anyhow thanks for those points
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Re: GMAT newbie: Subject Verb Agreement notes [#permalink] New post 22 Jul 2014, 08:03
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