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GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid.

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GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 01:11
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I am 33 year old, married with a 2-year old kid. I thought that my GMAT story could be useful to people in similar stages in their life.

Our scores: Myself: 720/6; My wife: 710/5.5

Objective:
My wife and I decided to pursue higher studies roughly a year ago. Both of us are MBA degree holders and we wanted to do a 2nd MBA. And we wanted to do it in a US or European university, and preferably in one of the top 10s.

Constraints:
Time constraints and lack of discipline to make use of the available time.
[We have a fairly busy career [I'm in product management; my wife is in sales]. We have 2-year old son , who’s in the prime age of experimenting with everything around him and we live in a typical Indian-style joint family with parents and sisters.]

We had several starts to a regular, disciplined preparation for the GMAT. They all petered out because of the fore mentioned constraints. The basic constraint was that we did not have a quiet place to study. As time ran out, we became anxious and frustrated. But frustration is a good thing to have, if it can be channelized to a productive work.

Study Plan:

Have the date in mind: We were in May'10. We decided that we need to have a deadline which will force us to study, hook or crook. Therefore, we went ahead and registered for the GMAT exam. We could get dates only in early July. We had about 2 months for the preparation. This deadline drove us hard to have a disciplined, rigorous study plan which ultimately.

Find the place: It is a best practice to have a good, organized place to study. Do not change your place of study often.
We sought a place where we will have 3 hours of quiet time and we wanted it to be close enough to our home so that we can return back in time to feed and put our son to bed. We found a playschool nearby and asked the owner to let us use the space in the evenings.

Study Plan: We devised a simple plan which comprised of the following basic tenets:
1) Devotedly spend 3 hours daily for the next 40-50 days.
2) Identify problem areas early on where we need to put in more effort - for e.g. areas such as absolute values coupled with inequalities, sentence corrections etc.
3) Work on practice tests and keep a tab of time regularly.

Most common problem areas and how we tackled them:
There are several tips available in GMAT Club and in other MBA forums on how to approach the GMAT. Hence, let me focus on those two areas which I feel are important:
1) Weak subject areas: Be aware of your weak areas. You should either master them to a decent level or you should be able to quickly move away from them [at the risk of getting them wrong] during the actual test. This will also help you to avoid panic attacks when you see a problem which you think you will not be able to solve.

How to identify weak areas: We started with the OG. The questions in OG are good samples of the problems that you will face on the exam day [after all, all OG questions are real GMAT questions]. This gave us an initial idea of where we made the most frequent problems. Knowing these weaker areas early on, helped us to put more effort on those areas.

How to improve on weak areas: The best way to work on weak areas is to work on more and more problems. This rigor helped us to spot patterns in questions, evolve some regular and quicker approaches to solving them etc.
How to get more problems on a particular area: Quite easy and inexpensive. For e.g. if you think absolute values is an area where you want to work more, select an appropriate forum in GMAT club. Every question in GMAT club is usefully tagged with key words and subject areas. Click on an appropriate tag [for e.g. inequalities] and you get a complete list of questions on that subject area. Work through them.

Learn from Experts: Even if you can get to the answer look at the approaches followed by others - there could be more effective and easier ways to solving a problem. You will easily spot some experts who repeatedly post some fantastic ways of solving or approaching a problem. As you progress, focus on the answers proposed by such key and trusted members [you can also choose a member whose approach you find easier to follow]. Sometimes, it so happens that different users propose different approaches [it’s sometimes awesome that there are several ways of solving a problem] to the same problem. You might not have the time to follow each answer. In such cases, it is helpful to look at the answers of your expert user.

Another forum, which we found very useful was Manhattan GMAT's. We especially, followed the approaches and suggestions of two instructors - Ron Purewal and Stacey Koprince. It’s our opinion that these two offer the most elegant and practical approaches to a problem [sometimes the approach could be just pure rhetoric testing with no.s]. In fact, I will go to the extent of saying, that we feel our heartfelt gratitude to these instructors for thrashing a problem beautifully [Btw, I'm not paid for by Manhattan!].

2) Time Management: This is extremely essential and I suspect that the main reason of why someone doesn't get those really high scores is that they fail to manage time properly [includes me as well].
In the initial days, one can focus on polishing their techniques, understanding and learning the subject areas. But as the exam approaches [at least 4 weeks before] one should start paying attention to his/ her timings. Here are some practices, which we found effective.

1) Right from the beginning of your studies, keep a timer whenever you start with a series of questions. You don't have to adhere to the timelines seriously, but keep a watch on how much time you take. Check if you are gradually reducing your time.
2) Take a bundle of 10 or 20 questions. Check your timing with a benchmark of approx. 2 minutes per question. [In the exam, you might take less than a minute for some questions and you might take more than 2 for tougher questions. But it is always good to adhere to the 2-minute benchmark].
3) Follow this Manhattan strategy: Practice the point 2 strategy but with really strict adherence to the 2-min. schedule. You should force yourself to answer each question within 2 minutes, whether or not you have worked out the solution.
4) As you approach the test day, start practicing with full tests. At least, take 2 or 3 practice tests fully and continuously – work right from the essays till the verbal. This will bring you closer to your experience on the actual test day. Because, mental fatigue is one big factor that affects your thinking abilities on the test day.

On the test day:
1) Have a good night’s sleep the day before. Force yourself to shut your books around 9 PM or so. Take time to deviate your mind – watch TV, read something [not GMAT-related], talk to friends. Get a warm glass of milk and hit the bed by 10.
2) Wake up at an adequate time. Reach the test center early enough. If allowed, talk to people around. Keep yourself cheerful.
3) Get something to drink and eat. GMAT is a long exam and physical and mental fatigue is natural. Hence, keep yourself active. Carry some cereal bars which are not too heavy, yet filling. Carry fruits like apple or banana [do not choose acidic fruits – which most fruits are – because they might turn up your hunger]. Many had suggested Gatorade, which I also found useful.
4) Use your notepads adequately. There’s no need to save on space there. They staff at the test center provide you enough notepads. So no need to worry. [And the pen and the scratchpad were also not bad. They were quite handy and useful].
5) Organize your space. You don’t need the keyboard after the essays are over. So push the keyboard to the side and keep your notepad in the centre so that you can look at the problem statements and note them down easily in your notepad.
6) Make use of the breaks. The 8-minute breaks are good periods to get prepared for the next section. Give yourself a stretch. Walk out of the test room. Grab something to eat and drink. Use the restroom. Splash a dash of coldwater [or warm water, if you prefer] on your face. Get refreshed.
7) Keep a note of the time – always. There are several time management strategies available in the web. Use them to your own good. The ultimate idea is to have those 2 minutes for your last question in each section as well. If you think you’re slipping by, you should make the hard decision of selecting a random answer choice, early enough into the test. You cannot make up for all the slips in time, towards the end of the test. Remember, a single incorrect answer choice in the middle of the test is better than a string of wrong answers at the end of the test.
8) At any time during the test, do not panic. And do not regret. There’s simply no time for such emotions during the test. Just keep moving ahead.

How did we lose?
Towards the end of our preparation, my wife and I were getting consistently high scores. We expected a score above 740 for sure. Hence, our scores were really dampeners. So, how did we lose:

Lack of concentration on verbal: I was fairly confident that I have done my quant section well [which was confirmed by the good score on that section]. I found the verbal section, tougher. Even the questions for critical reasoning and sentence correction, were relatively longer [or was it just my imagination?]. The questions were longer as well, making me spend a good amount of time on each question.
I was also considerably fatigued when I had reached not even the 20th question. One thing is that I was not keeping the best of my health [not that I was extremely ill as well]. Though I had bought enough food items to eat, in my anxiety I hadn’t eaten anything during the 1st 2 breaks. That took a toll.
Ultimately, I had a time crunch. I couldn’t get enough time to read my last 4 questions adequately well.
I should also say that I focused more on quants than verbal during preparation. This, I think, is foolish and is a common mistake done by many other GMAT-takers as well. People repeat this mistake, in spite of [inconclusive] trend analysis by many, such as Manhattan GMAT, that a higher verbal score usually leads to a higher overall score [when compared to same score levels in Quants].
So if at all, I am allowed to give one single piece of advice that would be this: Focus on your verbal. Perfect it. Ensure that you get consistently high scores [within time] in your practice tests. And keep your energy levels up till the very end of the test.

Some general tips:
1) Know to estimate or to do a rough calculation; Polish your guesswork. You should be able to out rightly strike out a few answer choices even without working out the problem fully.
2) Read all the answer choices fully before you start solving. For e.g. if the answer choices are disparate then you can easily use rough estimation techniques to get closer to one of the answer choices.
3) Memorize squares and cubes of no.s at least till 20. In general, know your multiplication tables till 20. Get to know some commonly used figures - such as all the squares or all the primes under 100.
4) Scan forums. They have some real gems. For e.g. you can come across many thumb rules that will help you to stop breaking your head (for e.g. a square no. has odd no. of factors! Can be useful in data sufficiency questions where they ask you determine if a no. is a perfect square or not.)
5) Remember: Solving is not the only way to answer a problem correctly.
6) Know your formulas by-heart. No alternative to this.
7) For sentence correction - know the 2/3 rule. It will help you in avoiding every answer choice fully before you chose or eliminate them.
8) Reading comprehension: Read the 1st question that you will be able to see before reading the paragraph. You can pay special attention to that question even as you give the 1st read.
9) Reading comprehension: If the paragraph is within 50 lines, read the paragraph thoroughly. Avoid rereading the paragraph as much as possible. [Manhattan suggests a strategy of outlining the reading comprehension essay in your notebook. We found it time consuming.]
10) Critical reasoning: These questions can be sometime really tough. Use quick diagrams and charts to understand complex relationships explained in the question paragraph.
11) Essays: Do not keep thinking. Just start jotting down ideas as they come to your mind in the response area. When you see your ideas in writing, you get better ideas. Choose a few ideas to develop them into full-bodied paragraphs. Think of a good introduction and conclusion.
e.g. Contrary to the usual notion, that the introduction is your understanding of the problem statement [many simply end up rephrasing the argument or issue statement], an introduction can also be an entry point to your main idea –for e.g. if you’re going to refute an argument, you can right away start with how people make mistakes in assuming something and then go on to make the idea specific to your problem statement.
Remember to delete your rough notes before you submit your response!

Important Sources of Study:
1) OG – Absolutely essential. Get a copy of OG. We found OG 12 to have slightly simpler questions than OG 10.

2) Practice tests: Keep a fresh set of full practice tests handy for your last leg of preparations. We found the Manhattan tests useful here. We found these tests to be slightly tougher than the GMAC sample tests [Quants especially]. Hence, we found the quant section relatively easier on the test day.

But you need other tests as well, during the course of your preparation. Almost every vendor, Manhattan, Princeton, GMAT club offer free tests. Make full use of them.

3) Forums: Best sources for learning, rhetoric practising and fine-tuning. GMAT Club and Manhattan forums are the only two forums which we followed to our advantage. The sheer variety and the no. of problems solved in these forums helped us get better with the question patterns and our approach to solving them.
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 02:25
great score and a great and inspiring debrief....Thank You!!!
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 05:06
So inspiring.I always had this notion....with work so difficult....but reading your debrief....no excuses.....all the best ahead!
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 09:38
congratulations to both of you.. a very good detailed debrief.. +1 for you.
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 08:23
Congrats to both of you - awesome debrief!! I can completely empathize with what your wife and you went through to get to this point. Not a lot of folks will ever appreciate how hard it must have been for your wife to isolate herself from her own child. I have a 3 year old child and I can say that it's very hard. There are so many things that can (and do) go wrong to jeopardize your well laid study plans. Picking an off-site to study was a brilliant idea - given the constant flow of visitors in a joint family and the overall chaotic atmosphere at home. I will heed your advise about building stamina - I too find myself wandering as the Verbal section gets along.

All the best for you and your wife's apps.
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 08:40
+1....some very good tips.....thanks
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 09:49
Hiiiiiiiii

Congrats to both of u!!!!!!!!!!!
thnx a bunch for this post as we are sailing in the same boat....
my husband n myself hv started prep n we hv a 2 yr 10 month old daughter....

can you please let me know wat were ur initial scores during the start of ur prep.?

thanks again .. it is very inspiring for us.:)
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 10:10
Hi Shankar2010,

Nice to read your story. My husband and I are also in the same boat. We have a naughty two year old and have to balance our time between hectic work schedule and grueling effort needed to get a great GMAT score.

I am in the second round of GMAT studies. In my first attempt , I scored a 670 (46Q 36V). And now planning to give the next GMAT in September to improve my scores. My husband is planning to give around October.

Congratulations to you and your wife for the great score - and greetings to your little one. All the best!
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 11:01
This is an inspiring story. Great job both of you guys!
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 11:12
+1, Shankar. You're a stud.
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 11:40
all i have to say is that your kid is going to the first one to break 800+ on this gmat's =P
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 12:03
Hats off to both of you!! Congrats and thanx for the debrief
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 14:50
Congatulations to you both....great scores.

My wife & myself are in the same boat, having 2 kids & preparing together for the exam. Thanks for sharing your experience and is definitely inspring.

All the best for your apps.
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 19:16
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Hello all,

Thanks to all of you for your appreciation and encouragement. I think I should have posted this during my prep. times - such encouragements can be really good energy boosters.

I wanted to address a few recurring themes and questions which I found in the posts. Some of my suggestions are specific to young parents:

1) For young parents, getting the GMAT right the first time would be extremely beneficial. Such parents would need to make several adjustments to their daily schedule, manage their kids and then sit to study. Such a balancing act can be a gruelling and no so convenient [there's the emotional stress of not tending to your kid as well].

Ours was our first attempt as well. Though we did expect a better score, we decided not to retake, as the incremental score increase will come with all the additional adjustments which we thought will not be fair towards other people - especially towards our son.

Postponing exam dates, prolonging studies, retaking the GMAT - all these increase such efforts and stress. Instead of having a long study schedule, try having a short, highly focussed and rigorous one. Often such practice is what that matters to clear exams such as GMAT. Of course, make sure you don't get burned down by the time you come out of your studies.

2) Again, at the cost of being thought repetitive, let me say this: Focus on your verbal. It is very, very important. Many of us do not tend to the verbal section with as much care as we tend to Quants. Several reasons for such attitude - its English Vs Maths, Quants is more mentally challenging (you 'work out' solutions), reading long sentences is boring, in a typical study day we start with Quants and by the time we come to Verbal we are almost out of energy. But I suppose your initial scores in Verbal should give you a jolt and bring you down to have a more realistic attitude :-D

There are several ways to fine tune Verbal:

1) Pay equal attention to both Quants and Verbal right from the beginning. Unless you're getting really great scores in Verbal, there's no reason to assume that you're going to find that section easy.

2) Definitely get well-versed with the basic Grammar rules that GMAT tets repeatedly. Get a good guide to know the patterns and the concepts tested. In my opinion, OG alone is not sufficient.

3) Alternate your study days with Quants and Verbal so that you get to focus on Verbal exclusively. Or if you prefer to do a bit of both on the same day, then at least make sure that you start with Verbal on a few days.

4) As usual, practice. In Verbal, it definitely gets better as you go through more and more questions.

5) Be prepared to plod through long, complex sentence structures. The idea is not to get tired of such sentences. The best way to cope up with such questions is to consider them as complex maths problems to solve (for instance, my wife takes great interest in solving tough maths questions. She will not crib. So it was easier for her to extend the same attitude towards such questions.)

3) Beef up your energy: Again, I repeat, as I got affected by this factor. Keep yourself healthy. GMAT study time is a good time to also lose weight :-D . Jogging, walking etc can be undertaken in the mornings. I'm sorry - I know such ideas can be really lofty when both the parents have regular jobs. However, a good walk or jog in the morning can be helpful to keep up energy levels. It can also be a good time to spend with your kids. It's also said that a good exercise triggers endorphins and other such chemicals in the brain which are helpful for one to remain cheerful, active and energetic throughout the day. Also, it would be fantastic if partners/ spouses refrain from petty fights and arguments during this time and instead shower love and affection on each other :-D - just avoid any non-value-adding mental energy spends. Understand that your partner is taking the same stress that you're talking - hmm.. some advice there.

But, I hope you get the picture. You know the best way of keeping yourself cheerful and active. And its important to eat and drink well on the day of the exam and remain positive throughout. As said earlier, for e.g. even if you think you did not do your Quants up to the mark, you can make it up by a fantastic score in Verbal. And on the day of the exam, all that you can do to achieve such great performance is to stay positive, focussed and attentive. For doing so, you need to be physically agile as well.

Finally, I think its definitely possible for working parents to get a score of 750 or 770. We don't have to be satisfied with scores of just 700+.
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 19:29
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Btw, its pleasantly surprising to find so many young parents (and incidentally with 2-year old kids) in the community. I think we should form a forum within GMAT Club to prod each other to keep up the spirit. Great going guys! All the best!
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2010, 19:38
My case is slightly different :) . I am a stay at home mom with a 1 yr old.
Your post is indeed encouraging.

All the best with your applications.
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2010, 02:34
Thanks for sharing your story.

My case is similar, I have a boy 1 year 7 months old, right now I'm preparing for the GMAT while my wife studies for her USMLE (US Medical License Exam, something like that). The difference is that we live about 500 kilometers from my wife's parents, and 16000 kilometers from my parents, so we don't have anybody to help us with the baby. But I agree that is very possible to spend 2-3 hours a day studying. We used to do it in the morning until he changed his sleeping habits and started to wake up at 6 in the morning! But now things have gone normal again and he sleeps until 8, so if we try hard we can get up and study few hours in the morning. The only thing I miss is talking with my friends on skype, I usually connected in the late evening (different time in my home country), but now we go to sleep early and cut that away. Well, sometimes I'm held talking with my parents or friends, and next day I can't wake up to study, but that's life, you can't do everything and have to sacrifice some things to pursue other activities.

Hope to give the exam in a couple of months and score as high as you did! Good luck in you application process.
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2010, 03:28
Hi Shankar,

your post is one gr8 energy booster for both my husband n myself....

we r planning to take gmat in a couple of months..

my diagnostic was 510( 43 - Q, 19 - V) . very poor time management in verbal. had no time for 15 q's . just guessed them..

my hubby had a better score 570.

if you can share your CAT test scores during prep, it will add more value to us. like initially, wat were ur scores b4 prep, during prep..

thanx again....

+1 kudos to both of u..
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 22 Aug 2010, 04:43
Hi Shankar, could you please tell me which books you prefer. I plan to take my GMAT next year but has been unable to head start, has been looking for books/ tips but I guess starting point is a bit difficult..
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Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid. [#permalink] New post 22 Aug 2010, 12:08
truly inspirational stuff.
Re: GMAT story of parents with 2-year old kid.   [#permalink] 22 Aug 2010, 12:08
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