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Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief

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Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2007, 12:45
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Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief system, dramatized the concept that the misfortune a person suffers is not an accident, but rather a logical outcome of flaws in that person's nature; the misfortune is thus that person's "fault." Nonetheless, today the public broadly supports bankruptcy protection, family welfare and other "social safety net" programs that shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense.

Which of the following, if true, would best resolve the paradox in the statements above?

    A) The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their society.
    B) The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare than those of Greek tragedy.
    C) Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents.
    D) Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy or to take advantage of other social safety net programs.
    E) The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to contribute to charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters, such as hurricanes.


pls exp ur ans...thanks...
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2007, 13:12
the paradox here is that while greek tragedy believes that a person's misfortune is his/her fault, in recent times, the greeks support social welfare systems that benefit the misfortunate and thus help fund such systems with their tax money.

the best explanation for this is provided by answer C, indicating that greeks believe that misfortune is a result not of an individual's action but that of society's.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2007, 16:17
I am with E.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2007, 08:12
The author signals the contrast with the keyword "Nonetheless".

He is surprised why people support such welfare programs even though it was proven in antiquity that the destitute suffer because of their own misdeeds.

E offers an explanation that religious obligations make them support such programs.

C points to the Greek tragedy part but doesn't help answer the paradox.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2007, 11:26
r019h wrote:
the paradox here is that while greek tragedy believes that a person's misfortune is his/her fault, in recent times, the greeks support social welfare systems that benefit the misfortunate and thus help fund such systems with their tax money.

the best explanation for this is provided by answer C, indicating that greeks believe that misfortune is a result not of an individual's action but that of society's.



Thanks again Vineet...u look set to rev up the GMAT eh!! :)
OA is 'E'
'C' is not correct "r019h" coz it states
Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents. But that is not ALL PEOPLE!!!
  [#permalink] 24 Jul 2007, 11:26
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Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief

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