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Having the right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper s

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Having the right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper s [#permalink] New post 27 Dec 2006, 13:52
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

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78% (01:40) correct 22% (01:31) wrong based on 1 sessions
Having the right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War, Horace Pippin, a Black American painter, worked by holding the brush in his right hand and guiding its movements with his left.

(A) Having the right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War
(B) In spite of his right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War
(C) Because there had been a sniper’s bullet during the First World War that crippled his right hand and arm
(D) The right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War
(E) His right hand and arm crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Dec 2006, 13:58
E
We need an opening modifying phrase for Horace, E is the clear winner.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Dec 2006, 15:12
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The opening statement is meant to describe Horace Pippin as indicated by the rest of the sentence. That "Horace Pippen" falls directly after the comma and opening portion of the sentence we know we are looking for something that modifies Horace.

A -Being in GMAT is ALMOST ALWAYS wrong. not always, but ALMOST always wrong, so be cautious of choosing it. Two -ing verbs (being and having) are unnecessary. A is very wordy and passive - two more no no's in GMAT.

B-In spite of his right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War, Horace Pippin, a Black American painter, worked by holding the brush in his right hand and guiding its movements with his left.
"In spite of" is not the correct usage here. In spite of is meant to indicate a major contrast.
"In spite of his two broken legs, he managed to finish the marathon."

In our sentence, Horace paints the way he does simply because of something else, not in spite of it.

Someone can probably explain better. And if I'm wrong, then disregard as this is just my $.02 :)
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Dec 2006, 18:24
bucitty, I think your explanation is good.
But shouldn't E be preceded with "Having" for it to work? Or is it fine the way it is?
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Dec 2006, 22:07
I will go with E too even though B comes tantalizingy close,
OA please
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2006, 07:37
B is out as ‘in spite of ‘ (to me) sound out of place.
C is plain strange.

E seems to be a passive voice as object is working on the verb not the subject but then it has missing ‘were’ after ‘His right hand & arm’.

D. Needs something like ‘Even though’ or ‘though’ in the beginning.

A is my answer.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2006, 07:52
introductory prepositional phrases and noun phrases can certainly be modifiers. Modifying phrases do not have to have participles or gerunds (-ing verbs)

eg.
Beneath the antique wooden fishing boat, barnacles had grown for years.

Underneath the noses of her parents, Ruth had hoarded three kilograms of cocaine
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2006, 08:41
Thanks for the clarification... E seems right to me now.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2006, 11:37
OA is E.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2007, 06:54
buckkitty wrote:
The opening statement is meant to describe Horace Pippin as indicated by the rest of the sentence. That "Horace Pippen" falls directly after the comma and opening portion of the sentence we know we are looking for something that modifies Horace.

A -Being in GMAT is ALMOST ALWAYS wrong. not always, but ALMOST always wrong, so be cautious of choosing it. Two -ing verbs (being and having) are unnecessary. A is very wordy and passive - two more no no's in GMAT.

B-In spite of his right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War, Horace Pippin, a Black American painter, worked by holding the brush in his right hand and guiding its movements with his left.
"In spite of" is not the correct usage here. In spite of is meant to indicate a major contrast.
"In spite of his two broken legs, he managed to finish the marathon."

In our sentence, Horace paints the way he does simply because of something else, not in spite of it.

Someone can probably explain better. And if I'm wrong, then disregard as this is just my $.02 :)


Excellent answer. Except for your example "in spite of".

I see the question contains a certain level of "contrast" itself: In spite of this, he managed to do that. Any other way to eliminate B? I would just say B contains the poisonous BEING... though it doesn't sound very strong to eliminate.
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Re: Sc-Having the right hand and arm being ... [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2007, 06:58
His right hand and arm crippled by a sniper's bullet during the First World War, Horace Pippin, a Black American painter, worked by holding the brush in his right hand and guiding its movements with his left.

His right hand and arm crippled by a sniper's bullet during the First World War is an absolute phrase, not a noun phrase.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2007, 07:13
solidcolor wrote:
buckkitty wrote:
The opening statement is meant to describe Horace Pippin as indicated by the rest of the sentence. That "Horace Pippen" falls directly after the comma and opening portion of the sentence we know we are looking for something that modifies Horace.

A -Being in GMAT is ALMOST ALWAYS wrong. not always, but ALMOST always wrong, so be cautious of choosing it. Two -ing verbs (being and having) are unnecessary. A is very wordy and passive - two more no no's in GMAT.

B-In spite of his right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War, Horace Pippin, a Black American painter, worked by holding the brush in his right hand and guiding its movements with his left.
"In spite of" is not the correct usage here. In spite of is meant to indicate a major contrast.
"In spite of his two broken legs, he managed to finish the marathon."

In our sentence, Horace paints the way he does simply because of something else, not in spite of it.

Someone can probably explain better. And if I'm wrong, then disregard as this is just my $.02 :)


Excellent answer. Except for your example "in spite of".

I see the question contains a certain level of "contrast" itself: In spite of this, he managed to do that. Any other way to eliminate B? I would just say B contains the poisonous BEING... though it doesn't sound very strong to eliminate.


I think the usage of Being is wrong and that's reason enough to eliminate B.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2007, 16:13
buckkitty wrote:
The opening statement is meant to describe Horace Pippin as indicated by the rest of the sentence. That "Horace Pippen" falls directly after the comma and opening portion of the sentence we know we are looking for something that modifies Horace.

A -Being in GMAT is ALMOST ALWAYS wrong. not always, but ALMOST always wrong, so be cautious of choosing it. Two -ing verbs (being and having) are unnecessary. A is very wordy and passive - two more no no's in GMAT.

B-In spite of his right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper’s bullet during the First World War, Horace Pippin, a Black American painter, worked by holding the brush in his right hand and guiding its movements with his left.
"In spite of" is not the correct usage here. In spite of is meant to indicate a major contrast.
"In spite of his two broken legs, he managed to finish the marathon."

In our sentence, Horace paints the way he does simply because of something else, not in spite of it.

Someone can probably explain better. And if I'm wrong, then disregard as this is just my $.02 :)


Excellent!!!...E it is...B is wrong because of the unnecessary use of the contrast(changes the meaning) and use of 'being'.
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Re: Having the right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper s [#permalink] New post 08 Mar 2014, 22:13
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Re: Having the right hand and arm being crippled by a sniper s   [#permalink] 08 Mar 2014, 22:13
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