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He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and

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He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2012, 15:57
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He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for his current show "Anger Management", Charles Sheen nevertheless left a successful legacy in the old show that continues to live on, and he gets honourable mentions, a feat very few stars of his era have been able to achieve.

A. He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for

B. Even though he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as compared to

C. He has not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

D. Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

E. Since he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

Could you please solve this by Process of Elimination. Thanks in advance.
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2012, 00:11
vivekv wrote:
Could you please solve this by Process of Elimination.

He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for his current show "Anger Management", Charles Sheen nevertheless left a successful legacy in the old show that continues to live on, and he gets honourable mentions, a feat very few stars of his era have been able to achieve.

A. He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for

B. Even though he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as compared to

C. He has not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

D. Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

E. Since he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

Thanks in advance.


This question tests your knowledge on idiom. How did I get this? Well look at the underlined part, it has a comparison marker as much...so the correct idiom is as much as.
Elimination-A
B-the second as should be parallel and comparable to the 1st as which is a clause. [remember when as is used for comparison, it must be followed by a clause or prepositional phrase(eclipse)
C-has not....perfect tense not required. [ perfect tense usage in 4 scenarios 1. an action that started in past and continues to present 2. the effect is still true in present context 3. For indefinite period of time. 4. For Since and Within Phrases when used in respect of time]
D-Correct
E-Since usage is not correct [subordinator] connected with comparer "as". doesn't make sense. The second part of the sentence doesn't give any explanation.

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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2012, 04:29
Hi,

I will try and run through each side by side to help

He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for his current show "Anger Management", Charles Sheen nevertheless left a successful legacy in the old show that continues to live on, and he gets honourable mentions, a feat very few stars of his era have been able to achieve.

A. He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for. This is unidiomatic. The correct term is 'as much for.... as for'

B. Even though he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as compared to. Again we have an unidiomatic phrase it should be 'as much for... as for'. The sentence is also clumsy and wordy.

C. He has not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for. Wrong tense, this is not an action in the past that is complete, here the acclaim is still happening

D. Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for. Correct. Parralel and Idiomatic.

E. Since he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for. Since is odd here, it doesn't add anything and is actually incorrect. It makes the whole thing like a subordinate phrase, but here we have to ask subordinate for what?

Thanks in advance.
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2012, 04:34
plumber250 wrote:
Hi,

I will try and run through each side by side to help

He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for his current show "Anger Management", Charles Sheen nevertheless left a successful legacy in the old show that continues to live on, and he gets honourable mentions, a feat very few stars of his era have been able to achieve.

A. He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for. This is unidiomatic. The correct term is 'as much for.... as for'

B. Even though he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as compared to. Again we have an unidiomatic phrase it should be 'as much for... as for'. The sentence is also clumsy and wordy.

C. He has not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for. This is not parallel, comparing him to his show

D. Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for. Correct. Parralel and Idiomatic.

E. Since he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for. Since is odd here, it doesn't add anything and is actually incorrect. It makes the whole thing like a subordinate phrase, but here we have to ask subordinate for what?

Thanks in advance.


plumber250 - Can you please explain the parallelism in option C?

Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

here we have as much FOR HIS (a prep phrase) ..... as HE IS.... (clause)

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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2012, 04:39
Hi - you beat me to the edit, I pressed send too early - correct rationale now in my post.

Thanks
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2012, 07:23
Thanks for your clarification,

FYI: E-gmat analysis.

A. He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for
Independent clauses connected using comma

B. Even though he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as compared to
As much X as compared to Y - is incorrect idiom. Should be "as much X as Y"

C. He has not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for
Independent clauses connected using comma, as in A

D. Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for
Open clause has been converted to a modifier, so connection issue is no longer present. :)

E. Since he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for
Changes the meaning of the sentence. Un-necessary and illogical causality has been introduced in the sentence.
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2012, 07:38
He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for his current show "Anger Management", Charles Sheen nevertheless left a successful legacy in the old show that continues to live on, and he gets honourable mentions, a feat very few stars of his era have been able to achieve.

A. He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for : Incorrect. Idiom error. Correct Idiom is AS MUCH X AS Y

B. Even though he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as compared to: Incorrect. Idiom error and even though is redundant as nevertheless in the non-underlined sentence communicates the contrast.

C. He has not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for: Incorrect. Parallelism error.

D. Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for: Correct.

E. Since he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for: Incorrect. Since is not required and changes meaning.
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2013, 10:21
Expert's post
A) Ungrammatical use as much …… than.. The first part of the sentence can not be an independent Clause since it is immediately followed by the main subject.

B) The first part of the sentence does not required the use of contrast word, as even though used in this case, because the second part has already created the contrast with the word nevertheless. Compared to is redundant and the structure as much for x as compared to y is awkward, wordy and perhaps ungrammatical.

C) he has incorrect because sentence does not require present perfect tense. The second part of the sentence starts with charles sheen ,the main subject, so the first part should be a modifying phrase and not an independent clause.

D) This choice correctly converts the the first part of the sentence in to a modifier. Other things fine, however the structure not acclaimed as much for x as he is for y does not satisfies the issue of concision. Experts, Please elaborate!

E) Since changes the intended meaning.
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and [#permalink] New post 11 Feb 2013, 10:55
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NarentheIndian wrote:
D) This choice correctly converts the the first part of the sentence in to a modifier. Other things fine, however the structure not acclaimed as much for x as he is for y does not satisfies the issue of concision.[/b] Experts, Please elaborate!

Dear NarentheIndian,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

Here is the correct OA version of the sentence:
(D) Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for his current show "Anger Management", Charles Sheen nevertheless left a successful legacy in the old show that continues to live on, and he gets honourable mentions, a feat very few stars of his era have been able to achieve.

My friend, I would say --- concision is a tricky thing. In general, we would say a sentence lacks concision if there clearly is a shorter yet grammatically correct way to say the same thing. For example, if I were to say ---

Not having as much acclaim for being on his show that was older, namely "Two and a Half Men" ....

--- that CLEARLY lacks concision. It is very wordy, and the OA above is a much shorter and more elegant way to say it.

Just the fact that a sentence has many words doesn't mean that it lacks concision. You see, most GMAT SC sentences are very long sentences. Many of them, like this one, could easily be broken into two sentences -----

Charles Sheen is acclaimed not as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as for his current show "Anger Management". Nevertheless, he left a successful legacy in this old show that continues to live on, and he gets honourable mentions, a feat very few stars of his era have been able to achieve.

In real world writing, that's always an option, and for a sentence like this, the two-sentence solution might be the best. BUT, that's never an option within the constraints of GMAT SC --- one of the ground rules of GMAT SC is that we have to keep everything as a single sentence, and that makes for some very long sentences.

Once again, the fact that a sentence is long is no crime. It's only a problem, a violation of the principle of concision, if there's clearly another shorter and grammatically correct way to say the same thing. In other words, like so many other important GMAT ideas, "concision" is deeply contextual and not an absolute.

Does all this make sense?

Mike :-)
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and [#permalink] New post 21 Aug 2014, 16:13
vivekv wrote:
He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for his current show "Anger Management", Charles Sheen nevertheless left a successful legacy in the old show that continues to live on, and he gets honourable mentions, a feat very few stars of his era have been able to achieve.

A. He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" than for

B. Even though he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as compared to

C. He has not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

D. Not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

E. Since he is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and a Half Men" as he is for

Could you please solve this by Process of Elimination. Thanks in advance.

Even-though I answered this question correctly , I was stumped by the question. Option D is little odd as the subject of the opening clause comes in the later part of the sentence and not in the beginning. I mistook this as an nonparallel construct, i.e. "Not acclaimend as much for his old show ... as he is for" seems little odd , more convenient version should be "Not acclaimend as much for his old show ... as for his..." . At first glance I overlooked this answer but then after reviewing rest , i came back to the answer and marked it right, wasting 1 minute extra - total time taken to solve this SC question was 2.55 Mins.

Can anyone point out how can I improve my timing, especially when faced with this type of questions ?
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and [#permalink] New post 21 Aug 2014, 16:30
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dransa wrote:
Even-though I answered this question correctly , I was stumped by the question. Option D is little odd as the subject of the opening clause comes in the later part of the sentence and not in the beginning. I mistook this as an nonparallel construct, i.e. "Not acclaimed as much for his old show ... as he is for" seems little odd , more convenient version should be "Not acclaimend as much for his old show ... as for his..." . At first glance I overlooked this answer but then after reviewing rest , i came back to the answer and marked it right, wasting 1 minute extra - total time taken to solve this SC question was 2.55 Mins.

Can anyone point out how can I improve my timing, especially when faced with this type of questions ?

Dear dransa
I'm happy to respond. :-)

The structure of the OA here is sophisticated. It is definitely something one sees in more formal writing, for example, in academic writing, or in other "high brow" writing. How do you learn to recognize this as correct? You have to develop a habit of reading. Especially if English is not your native language, you have to read every day for an hour a day --- that's over and above any GMAT preparations you may be doing. You have to read high quality material in English. Here are some recommendations on what to read:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-reading-list/
When you read high quality material, you will develop intuition for the more sophisticated grammatical structures. If, in your reading, you come across sentence that don't seem correct to you, then post them here and ask me or other experts for help. Through time, you will develop an "ear" for these complext structures, and this will make everything about the GMAT Verbal section easier for you.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and [#permalink] New post 22 Aug 2014, 10:29
mikemcgarry wrote:
dransa wrote:
Even-though I answered this question correctly , I was stumped by the question. Option D is little odd as the subject of the opening clause comes in the later part of the sentence and not in the beginning. I mistook this as an nonparallel construct, i.e. "Not acclaimed as much for his old show ... as he is for" seems little odd , more convenient version should be "Not acclaimend as much for his old show ... as for his..." . At first glance I overlooked this answer but then after reviewing rest , i came back to the answer and marked it right, wasting 1 minute extra - total time taken to solve this SC question was 2.55 Mins.

Can anyone point out how can I improve my timing, especially when faced with this type of questions ?

Dear dransa
I'm happy to respond. :-)

The structure of the OA here is sophisticated. It is definitely something one sees in more formal writing, for example, in academic writing, or in other "high brow" writing. How do you learn to recognize this as correct? You have to develop a habit of reading. Especially if English is not your native language, you have to read every day for an hour a day --- that's over and above any GMAT preparations you may be doing. You have to read high quality material in English. Here are some recommendations on what to read:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-reading-list/
When you read high quality material, you will develop intuition for the more sophisticated grammatical structures. If, in your reading, you come across sentence that don't seem correct to you, then post them here and ask me or other experts for help. Through time, you will develop an "ear" for these complext structures, and this will make everything about the GMAT Verbal section easier for you.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)

Hi Mikemcgarry ,
Thanks for the quick response. I have 30 days left to my GMAT. However, since I want to use all the help I can get to reach my targeted score in verbal, I recently subscribed to WSJ. But I see that the online version of WSJ has many categories and many sections in each of the categories. As I do not have time to read all of those in 1 hr a day, can you direct me to a section ,of WSJ, where I will find the most challenging English to read,so that I will get the max out of the time I will invest in reading.
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and [#permalink] New post 22 Aug 2014, 10:54
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dransa wrote:
Hi Mikemcgarry ,
Thanks for the quick response. I have 30 days left to my GMAT. However, since I want to use all the help I can get to reach my targeted score in verbal, I recently subscribed to WSJ. But I see that the online version of WSJ has many categories and many sections in each of the categories. As I do not have time to read all of those in 1 hr a day, can you direct me to a section ,of WSJ, where I will find the most challenging English to read,so that I will get the max out of the time I will invest in reading.

Dear dransa,
I'm happy to respond. :-) I don't think any one section will have any more sophisticated writing then any other section. I would urge you to read as many sections as possible. Perhaps you could select sections randomly. Perhaps you could check off the section you read any one day, and read other sections the next day. I think the most important thing is to get as much variety as possible. In fact, I would also recommend taking a look, from time to time, at the Bloomberg Businessweek and the Economist magazine, just for more variety. Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: He is not acclaimed as much for his old show "Two and   [#permalink] 22 Aug 2014, 10:54
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