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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 15:48
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2013, 21:22
mun23 wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Finding this question difficult for me.Need every option`s explanation


Here's my take on this:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - Incorrect It has no clear antecedent. It can refer to either 'Heavy commitment' or to a 'course of action'.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. - IncorrectThe last clause in the sentence incorrectly modifies An executive erroneously implying that the executive makes it more likely to miss signs :lol:
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.. - Incorrect Unclear in meaning, the last clause should have been just after 'a course of action'.
This would have been the correct form-
An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.- IncorrectThe apostrophe(') after Executive ruins the cake here here :wink: . This incorrect sentence seems to imply Something of Executives is heavily committed(which makes no sense) and 'them' now has no clear antecedent.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - Correct No problems here, which debunks the theory that BEING is automatically wrong on GMAT SC :)
IMO - E

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2013, 14:08
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You can see a video explanation here: http://www.gmatpill.com/gmat-practice-t ... stion/2177

Note that usage of "who" in B and C is OK - the issue lies more in the structure of the remaining sentence.

(B) says that "an executive" makes "missing signs of incipient trouble" - which doesn't make sense.

With (C) - the phrase

"especially if it has worked well in the past."

We don't know what "it" refers to here. If anything - "it" should "they" - but even so the meaning of what follows doesn't make sense with the first half of (C).
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2013, 06:20
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A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. ---- Especially if it--- What does - it - denote? Commitment or action? Ambiguity –Antecedent and meaning of second - it - is also suspect. What does it likely make to miss signs?

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. ---- How to make missing signs – really funny.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. --- The choice first says – signs and they – a plural noun and pronoun and in the next breath calls it in the singular- it -


D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. ---Executives’ being – rather awkward; No proper antecedent for them; first them must refer to executives, which is not there and the second – them- by logic should refer to the signs. A pronoun having two referents is ungrammatical

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. __- being as part of a subject phrase is acceptable since we cannot form the subject without the being. Being is taboo, only when it is superfluous and dispensable.

E is the king.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2013, 06:55
anish123ster wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

good question..please give explanation for your answer..OA after initial discussion

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2013, 23:11
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This is a great (and rare) case of 'being' used correctly in a GMAT sentence. It can happen...

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Heavy commitment by an executive [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2013, 23:47
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2013, 11:55
A question where Being is in the correct option :-O
Had to get it wrong ...
But i think i should stick to the plan of not considering B in the options as the exam is just 10 days away!!!
Nice question though!!
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2013, 09:27
marine wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Change that OA, Its between B and C, C has the best structure E changes meaning of sentence by making executive incharge
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2013, 09:34
docdrizzeally wrote:
marine wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Change that OA, Its between B and C, C has the best structure E changes meaning of sentence by making executive incharge


hi mr. doc...
sorry to say but this is an official question...and OA is E.
so if you already taken your GMAT and finished your goal...then just leave ..and if you are preparing for GMAT...just find out where you are wrong..
regards
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2013, 09:42
docdrizzeally wrote:

Change that OA, Its between B and C, C has the best structure E changes meaning of sentence by making executive incharge


59 in QA ... :O
never seen someone with this score ...
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 30 Aug 2013, 07:02
Hi all,

if we go through answer choices, we can drill down to choice E, which seams to be the best one to me:

A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear - examine "makes it likely", where it does not have an antecedent. "it" should have a noun/pronoun antecedent, except when "it" is used as Placeholder, such as "it was raining outside"

B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear - "makes missing signs" is not a correct form to express what the author meant.

C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past - examine "if it has worked" part; here, pronoun "it" could refer to either course of action or to incipient trouble. since "it" does not have clear antecedent, we rule out this choice.

D) Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear - look at the phrase "if it has worked"; as in answer choice A, "it" here does not have a noun/pronoun antecedent to refer to. so we rule out this option too.

E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - in this correct answer choice "especially one that has worked well in the past" clearly refers to a course of action and this modifier is correctly placed next to the course of action; "miss signs of incipient trouble" correctly conveys what the author meant; and in the last part of the sentence "misinterpret them when they do appear" - them and they both clearly refer to "signs", because these pronouns are plural and only "signs" are plural in the sentence, so "them/they" can not refer to anything else, such as "course of action", "executive" or "incipient trouble".
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Re: [#permalink] New post 30 Aug 2013, 09:08
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vasild wrote:
Ritesh, I actually believe that "Being heavily committed to a course of action" in E serves as a noun phrase and as a subject, not as a modifier.

(The state of) being heavily comitted is likely to cause ...


Yes - that's the way to think about the usage of "being" - add the words "the state of" or "the act of" in front of it and see if it makes sense.

This is a good example of when the usage of the word "being" is actually used in the correct answer of a GMAT question. Most of the time, we call it a "red flag" word - it's not necessarily wrong, but you should look elsewhere first.

But this question fits the rare situation that would allow the usage of "being" to be correct.

You can see more details about "being" as a red flag word - and specific situations in which it is actually correct by looking at this PDF: http://www.gmatpill.com/ebook/GMATPill- ... atclub.pdf

Also, we've posted a video explanation for this question here (click show answer): http://www.gmatpill.com/gmat-practice-t ... stion/2177
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2013, 22:24
I myself not favor rejection of 'being' just like that.

BEING is VERBING of the verb BE.

My query pertains to FACT that although option (C). as unclear pronoun antecedent for "IT", I found (E). not interesting either because 'BEING' is an INITIAL MODIFIER and should modify the following subject , but the sentence doesn't have a following subject.

Being heavily committed to a course of action,is likely to make an

Who is BEING HEAVILY COMMITTED ???

I know we have to take best option in SC. However, a discussion will enhance our knowledge and what GMAC thinks :)

Plz advise !!

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2013, 22:37
I chose E, and it is the correct one.

By the way, in D, is there an apostrophe in the word "Executives"?

C should be rejected because of "it" being ambiguous.

D has no ambiguity problem, but the construction is so awkward.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 14 Sep 2013, 07:36
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TGC wrote:
I myself not favor rejection of 'being' just like that.

BEING is VERBING of the verb BE.

My query pertains to FACT that although option (C). as unclear pronoun antecedent for "IT", I found (E). not interesting either because 'BEING' is an INITIAL MODIFIER and should modify the following subject , but the sentence doesn't have a following subject.

Being heavily committed to a course of action,is likely to make an

Who is BEING HEAVILY COMMITTED ???

I know we have to take best option in SC. However, a discussion will enhance our knowledge and what GMAC thinks :)

Plz advise !!

Rgds,
TGC!


You have to be careful with present participles (-ing verb forms). Present participles are verbs when they have a helping verb, modifiers, or nouns (gerunds). In choice E, 'Being heavily committed' is a noun phrase led by the gerund 'Being'. That noun phrase is the subject of the sentence, not a leading modifier.

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 14 Sep 2013, 08:53
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HarishLearner wrote:
I chose E, and it is the correct one.

By the way, in D, is there an apostrophe in the word "Executives"?

C should be rejected because of "it" being ambiguous.

D has no ambiguity problem, but the construction is so awkward.


There is an apostrophe on Executives' in answer choice D. 'Being heavily committed to a course of action' is a noun phrase and it is the executives who are heavily committed so we use the possessive form of executives - 'Executive's being heavily committed'. This is probably more easily seen if we use a simpler construction - "Executives' heavy commitment". The 'heavy commitment' is the noun and executives needs the possessive.

The real problem with D is the antecedent shift with "them". The first "them" refers back to executives but the second "them" refers to signs. You can't shift antecedents with pronouns in the same sentence.

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 14 Sep 2013, 20:23
KyleWiddison wrote:
HarishLearner wrote:
I chose E, and it is the correct one.

By the way, in D, is there an apostrophe in the word "Executives"?

C should be rejected because of "it" being ambiguous.

D has no ambiguity problem, but the construction is so awkward.


There is an apostrophe on Executives' in answer choice D. 'Being heavily committed to a course of action' is a noun phrase and it is the executives who are heavily committed so we use the possessive form of executives - 'Executive's being heavily committed'. This is probably more easily seen if we use a simpler construction - "Executives' heavy commitment". The 'heavy commitment' is the noun and executives needs the possessive.

The real problem with D is the antecedent shift with "them". The first "them" refers back to executives but the second "them" refers to signs. You can't shift antecedents with pronouns in the same sentence.

KW


Thanks a lot for pointing out the error in D.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 15 Sep 2013, 10:50
Great question Marine!

This really tests your knowledge of the use of "Being" and the few times it is actually correct. When Being is used as a verb it will almost always be rejected as "redundant" by the GMAT, however I believe in this sentence Being is used as a gerund in which case it works, and is the best option for the sentence. Answer E, although this is definitely tough.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2014, 08:57
marine wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


A bunch of pronouns we need to focus on here:

Between B and E:

B) "misinterpreting" should be "misinterprets" because it refers to "an excecutive". "Ones likely when they do appear" is ambiguous, what does ones refer to? signs? It might refer to signs, but it is vague.

E) Being heavily committed....(inessential clause)... is likely to make an executive" this makes perfect sense.. "miss signs or misinterpret THEM", them refers to signs, "when THEY do appear" also refers to signs. "being committed..makes an executive..miss signs... or misinterpret them"... Those are the only important parts of the text. E is correct
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2014, 11:06
beside "being" and the parallelism of "misinterpreting" and "miss", what else is wrong with D
Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,   [#permalink] 16 Feb 2014, 11:06
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