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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 15:48
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2005, 06:35
Vaslid,

You got me. But here is what I think.

Being heavily committed to a course of action. Who is committed??

Lets change the sentence a bit...

Preparing for GMAT, Vaslid, being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Now think about it. Here you have supplied a Noun or Subject, which is has a predicate and sentence makes prefect sense..

E seems to indicate that the course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs...

Even If that is the case, then "One" does not resolve anything.

The sentence is of poor quality.

I will not be surprised if the OA and E... You know what I mean...

And look at the question, what is this sentence testing???
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2005, 07:04
riteshgupta1 wrote:
Lets change the sentence a bit...

Preparing for GMAT, Vaslid, being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Now think about it. Here you have supplied a Noun or Subject, which is has a predicate and sentence makes prefect sense..

E seems to indicate that the course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs...

Even If that is the case, then "One" does not resolve anything.


I really don't understand why you see a problem with "one" in E. I think it clearly refers to the "course of action".

"Being heavily committed" is the subject of the sentence, so you don't need to supply a new one. By introducing "Preparing for the GMAT, Vasil,..." you actually transform the original subject into a modifier.

What do you mean by "what is this sentence testing"?

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 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2005, 13:41
vasild wrote:
riteshgupta1 wrote:
Lets change the sentence a bit...

Preparing for GMAT, Vaslid, being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Now think about it. Here you have supplied a Noun or Subject, which is has a predicate and sentence makes prefect sense..

E seems to indicate that the course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs...

Even If that is the case, then "One" does not resolve anything.


I really don't understand why you see a problem with "one" in E. I think it clearly refers to the "course of action".

"Being heavily committed" is the subject of the sentence, so you don't need to supply a new one. By introducing "Preparing for the GMAT, Vasil,..." you actually transform the original subject into a modifier.

What do you mean by "what is this sentence testing"?

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btw Ritesh, I don't mean to get on your nerves or anything. I just think it's useful to have an argument going


Please, dont even think that way. It is very useful. Whatever I have learned is, believe me or not, from people like you. Here is what I think....

"Being heavily committed" is a participle phrase, not a noun phrase....
Where do you see a noun in the whole "subject".

Who is heavily committed...

Normally, how do you determine a subject. You ask a question in the sentence by asking "Who", "WHAT" is doing the action or being acted upon. Same goes for adjectives (what kind of) and adverbs (When, where and How).

It is clear phrase which needs to modify something...
And One THAT is always redundant in GMAT. You can easily change the sentence (If you think E is perfect) to, without changing the meaning..

being heavily committed to a course of action, especially , that has worked well in the past.

Why do you need one that...?

If you dont agree, the check OG question question No 9
Astronomers at the Palomar Observatory have discovered a distant supernova explosion, one that they believe is a type previously unknown to science.

I agree with you that E is best among the worst choices. And I am asking again, what type of sentence its it. Is it testing something? What is it testing? I dont see any comparsion, modifier problem, or subject verb agreement at all...

GMAT questions have a depth and test your knowledge on certain key things only. This question is useless...
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2005, 14:06
Now I see what you mean with the "what is it testing" question. I didn't realize that the GMAT is testing such specific categories of problems.

I guess I don't think in GMAT terms all that much, so E didn't sound so blatantly wrong to me. I obviously don't know formal grammar as well as you do, so I can't effectively argue with you on many of the remarks.

Anyways, we had our discussion... I'll be waiting to have more of that fun on some other thread :)
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Re: SC: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 23 Aug 2005, 18:49
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Wrong. "it" doesn't have clear reference. It could refer to heavy commitment, or a course of action.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
"missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones", "ones" is definitely wrong.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
Correct. "it" refers to "a course of action". I would perhaps prefer if the last phrase is placed closer to "a course of action" (like adding it between "action" and "is", embrased with commas) to make sure "it"'s reference is clearer. However as it is now there's no grammar errors.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
This whole sentence is awkward. The subject is too long. "it"'s reference is not very clear, could be "a course", could be the subject itself. "miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them" is more cubumsome than "miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble". Most importantly, it has several "them" and "they" with unclear reference. Some of the "them" refers to the executives, others refer to the signs of trouble.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Again, the subject is too long and incorrect. "miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them" is cubumsome. This sentence also has a passive slant.

I'd choose C.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Aug 2005, 04:42
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- Clumsy sentence construction "Heavy commitment by an executive..."

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
- 'makes missing signs of incipient trouble' is awkaward

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
- Clumsy construction with 'executives' being heavily committed'

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- 'Being heavily committed' would be better if the later part was 'is likely to cause' rather than 'likely to make an executive'

C is the best. It flows well and has no bad construction.

Please post the OA. Thanks.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Aug 2005, 18:36
My take on this is that if we are not 100% what is being modified then that option is wrong....looking at the answer choices, all choices have a flaw, they have subjective pronouns which are not refering to any subject...i.e "it" etc..

from the choices, E sounds better, thats about it...it is grammatically wrong....in the gmat world we pick the best choice....I gues i will have to trust my ear on this one....

vasild wrote:
riteshgupta1 wrote:
Lets change the sentence a bit...

Preparing for GMAT, Vaslid, being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Now think about it. Here you have supplied a Noun or Subject, which is has a predicate and sentence makes prefect sense..

E seems to indicate that the course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs...

Even If that is the case, then "One" does not resolve anything.


I really don't understand why you see a problem with "one" in E. I think it clearly refers to the "course of action".

"Being heavily committed" is the subject of the sentence, so you don't need to supply a new one. By introducing "Preparing for the GMAT, Vasil,..." you actually transform the original subject into a modifier.

What do you mean by "what is this sentence testing"?

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Nov 2005, 18:03
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Nov 2005, 18:34
A. second 'it' has not clear referent
B. awkward
D. awkward

Between C and E, I go with E. All the pronouns stick close to what they are modifying. IN C, the second 'it' is seperated from 'course of action'

E for me.
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2007, 20:39
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 06:44
E is the best choices. But as rightly pointed out by a few, the phrase "especially if it has worked well in the past" should refer to a course of action but that reference is not clear. This phrase should ideally be next to the course of action to be able to describe it properly.

Usually picking a sentence with "being" in it is risky but in this case E is the best choice.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 07:05
D By POE:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. – Not sure what ‘it’ is referring to.

B. Changes the meaning, it seems that the executive himself makes it happen not his heavy commitment.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. – Use of ‘it’ kills it.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. – Funny looking but only one standing for me.

E. Strange – Lets rephrase: Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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Re: SC [Heavy Commitment] [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 18:23
johnycute wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Although E uses passive voice, it is still preferred to -in my opinion- 2nd best C, which has an ambiguous "it" that should refer to "course of action" but has "incipient trouble" as its nearest noun.

"Especially one that has worked well in the past", the appositive noun phrase in E, is well placed. In general, E is clear, grammatical and concise.
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 29 May 2007, 19:22
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2007, 19:35
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. => "it" what commitment / course of action ?

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. => "it" / wordy

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. => wordy

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Between A & E
I will go with E the best fit !!
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2007, 14:56
Jamesk486 wrote:
its C
but wouldn't the "it" and "they" be confusing in terms of referents?


To me, "they" have a clear reference, that is "signs of reference".
So does "it" with "a course of action".
What disturbs me is the fact that the part "especially when it worked in the past" is place at the end of the sentence. IMO, it makes sentence a little bit difficult to understand.
On the other hand, C is the best choice among others.
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2007, 14:53
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2007, 15:50
B for lack of better choices.

A. "makes it likely"- makes what likely?
C. "especially if it has worked well in the past" should be next to "action"
D. "Executives’ being heavily committed" is awkward and the "being" makes it wrong.
E. Again "being" makes this wrong
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Aug 2007, 00:51
A. 'makes it likely to miss signs' -> 'it' doesn't have clear referent

B. 'makes missing signs of' -> awkward phrasing

C. 'especially if it has worked well in the past' -> appears to suggest the signs worked wekk

D. 'Executives’ being' -> awkward

E is best. Clear about what the sentence is trying to say and no pronoun error.
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Re: SC executive [#permalink] New post 02 Aug 2007, 09:31
To me the real choice is between A and E.
Try to understand the meaning of a sentence; it is trying to say " too much commitment makes bad things likely to happen" ( as in A), NOT executive (as in B and C).
In E, "being committed" is ackward.

So, my choice is A


stevegt wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Re: SC executive   [#permalink] 02 Aug 2007, 09:31
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