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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 15:48
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Aug 2007, 12:16
E is my Choice too.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked .....


"An executive is" does not agree with "one that worked". If it was "one that HAS worked in the past", then it might have been a little better, but still would suffer from the awkward sentence composition and an ambiguous reference to "they" in the second part:
makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
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Against E [#permalink] New post 02 Aug 2007, 23:00
In E – If we ignore the 2nd clause - “especially one that has worked well in the past” the sentence would read -

Being heavily committed to a course of action, .. is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Is this not a misplaced modifier, since it is the executive who is heavily committed.

Please correct me if I’m wrong
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2007, 10:17
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2007, 10:55
"A"

pronouns are everywhere.

E is out , modifier error
D pronoun error
C good contendor but i dont like "it" on the second clause
B awkward

what do you guys think
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Re: SC [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2007, 11:17
bkk145 wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


E is the ans -- where's the modifier error in E?

A. Heavy commitment is awkward wording.
B. "Executive makes missing signs likely" is wrong.
C. Especially if it has worked well is misplaced.
D. "makes them likely to miss signs or misinterpreting them" is wrong.
E. No error, E is the Ans.
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Re: SC [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2007, 18:36
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

C is not possible because - IT is the wrong pronoun because it can't point to plural signs (of incipient trouble)

A was close and I was going to pick it up - but I realized that A does not have a subject for the verb TO MISS.... for WHOM has the heavy commitment made it likely to miss signs? No one. hence out.
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Re: SC [Heavy Commitment] [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2007, 21:41
Hi,

Doesnt E suffer from a misplaced modifier ?

Being heavily committed to a course of action,....
Ideally it should be -> Being heavily committed to a course of action, the executive...

I feel C is better than E due to its this reason. Also the 'it' in C is not very ambigious.

Comments.. help ?

Andr359 wrote:
johnycute wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Although E uses passive voice, it is still preferred to -in my opinion- 2nd best C, which has an ambiguous "it" that should refer to "course of action" but has "incipient trouble" as its nearest noun.

"Especially one that has worked well in the past", the appositive noun phrase in E, is well placed. In general, E is clear, grammatical and concise.
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 10 Feb 2008, 04:47
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

why is E incorrect?
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Re: sc 19 - being - set 13 [#permalink] New post 10 Feb 2008, 20:57
Very good one.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. [It has referent issue – points to Heavy commitment/ a course of action also passive – eliminate it]

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.[missing rather act as a verb is acting as participle and Improperly modifying the signs of trouble and “ones” is not clear – eliminate it]

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.[ Sentence is almost Ok except placement of adverbial phrase. If “especially if it has worked well in the past” is placed after action, then this would be a very attractive choice – Hold it]

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.[them – cannot point to “Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action” – eliminate it]

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.[A very good technique to solve flip sentences (Verb comes first or expletive construction ) is rearrange subject verb order.

An executive, being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Now, analysis: Subject – Verb order preserved (An executive – is). But only caveat is “is likely to make miss” sounding awkward. – eliminate it)


Answer: C
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Re: sc 19 - being - set 13 [#permalink] New post 11 Feb 2008, 04:26
A can not be the answer, A is using "it" twice and every time for a different purpose.

C is not a great construction because it distanced "especially if it has worked well in the past" from "action" that it is modifying but still it the best of all.

C should be the answer.
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 11 Jun 2009, 17:54
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misnterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

(D) Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to mke an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2009, 04:05
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misnterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

(D) Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to mke an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear

E is clearest but I could not find anything wrong with A!

Could someone clarify please?
ALso hthe OA?
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2009, 18:06
mrsmarthi wrote:
Can anyone explain why C is wrong?


Hi mrsmarthi,

The official explanation given is that in choice (C), "The reference for the pronoun it is unclear because many nouns have intervened between the appearance of the logical referent (course of action) and it.
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2009, 18:12
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Dear All,

This question is #101 of the 12th ed OG, and the official explanation can be found at page 736.

This sentence explains that an executive who is blindly committed to a proven course of action is likely to overlook or misinterpret indicators that the plan may no longer be working. The sentence needs to make clear who may misinterpret these indicators.

(A) The passive construction causes the sentence to be wordy and confusing; the reference for it is ambiguous, leaving hte reader with questions about who or what is likely to miss these signs.

(B) The sentence structure indicates that the executive,not his or her strategy, causes signs to be overlooked; the modifier when they do appear is misplaced.

(C) The reference for the pronoun it is unclear because many nouns have intervened between the appearance of the logical referent (course of action) and it.

(D) Misinterpreting should be an infinitive verb form to parallel miss; the phrasing throughout the sentence is wordy and akward.

(E) Correct. The grammatical structure of this sentence and the appropriate palcement of modifiers expreses the meaning clearly and concisely.
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2009, 21:12
OA:E.
Most of us know have problem with E 'cos of the word BEING>which is almost always wrong.But this question shows that "being" can also be correct.
CAN SOMEONE PUT UP THE RULES AS TO WHEN EXACTLY IS BEING CORRECT??
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2010, 10:36
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of
action, especially if it has worked well in the past,
makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or
misinterpret them when they do appear.
(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear.
(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action, especially one that worked well
in the past, makes missing signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.
(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret
signs of incipient trouble when they do appear,
especially if it has worked well in the past.
(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting them when they do
appear.
(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past,
is likely to make an executive miss signs of
incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they
do appear
[Reveal] Spoiler:
E

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Last edited by mojorising800 on 21 Jan 2010, 23:16, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: CR OG [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2010, 17:31
My take is C as well

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear. - no antecedent
(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action, especially one that worked well
in the past, makes missing signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear. - meaning changed
(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret
signs of incipient trouble when they do appear,
especially if it has worked well in the past. - correct , they refers to signs and it refers to course

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting them when they do
appear. - being is not required , also Executives’ looks wrong

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past,
is likely to make an executive miss signs of
incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they
do appear - being is not required
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Re: CR OG [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2010, 02:36
bakfed wrote:
I'm going with (C).

This sentence has a lot of pronoun ambiguity and the usage of "being" doesn't help in (D) and (E).


This is an official questions and the OA is E, so I wouldn't try to question the OA because GMAT says that the correct answer choice is E but rather learn something from it.

Last edited by mikeCoolBoy on 21 Jan 2010, 12:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: CR OG [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2010, 21:54
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ichha148 wrote:
Why is being required in E ?


here being is a gerund and is part of the subject of the sentence.
Consider this another example of a GMAT problem in which being is used correctly


Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear

being genetically engineered does not make a plant any more likely to become an invasive or persistent weed, according to a decade-long study published in the journal Nature


These two sentences have basically the same structure. Being is a gerund and part of the subject

Now consider this other problem OG #110 verbal review second edition

Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee has lived in England and Canada, and first came to the United States in 1961 to study at the Iowa Writers' Workshop

According to OG being is wordy here.


So the lesson you can learn from these is problems is the following

if being is a gerund that forms part of the subject ---> OK
if being modifies a noun and is not passive voice ---> wrong

now try to look for other uses of being in OFFICIAL PROBLEMS and extract more rules, I write down the examples in your notes.

if you do this for every SC concept, you'll learn a lot.
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Re: SC OG [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2010, 05:09
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silasaaa2 wrote:
Can someone please post the explanations from official guide for all the answer choices

Th is sentence explains that an executive who is
blindly committed to a proven course of action is
likely to overlook or misinterpret indicators that
the plan may no longer be working. Th e sentence
needs to make clear who may misinterpret these
indicators.
A Th e passive construction causes the sentence
to be wordy and confusing; the reference for
it is ambiguous, leaving the reader with
questions about who or what is likely to miss
these signs.
B Th e sentence structure indicates that the
executive, not his or her strategy, causes signs
to be overlooked; the modifi er when they do
appear is misplaced.
C Th e reference for the pronoun it is unclear
because many nouns have intervened
between the appearance of the logical
referent (course of action) and it.
D Misinterpreting should be an infi nitive verb
form to parallel miss; the phrasing
throughout the sentence is wordy and
awkward.
E Correct. Th e grammatical structure of this
sentence and the appropriate placement of
modifi ers expresses the meaning clearly and
concisely.
Th e correct answer is E.
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Re: SC OG   [#permalink] 22 Jan 2010, 05:09
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