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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 15:48
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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Re: SC OG [#permalink] New post 23 Jan 2010, 16:22
My notes about using being -

being in an answer option is wrong more often than it is right. however, when idiomatic structures do not have a counterpart that constitute a subject and verb, being is used which is grammatically a noun, derived from a verb, a gerund. Another possibility is the structure - with + noun + being + noun complement.

I was caught up between A and E, all other options either misplace modifiers or are awkwardly worded. E was truly a bouncer at the first place. Reading the above explanations, it actually makes more sense than all the other options, in fact, sets right the original sentence, which seems to be more in a passive voice construct.
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Re: SC OG [#permalink] New post 24 Jan 2010, 14:26
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of
action, especially if it has worked well in the past,
makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or
misinterpret them when they do appear.
(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear.
pronoun it is ambigious... INCORRECT


(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action, especially one that worked well
in the past, makes missing signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.
'makes missing signs of incipient trouble'..... not correct...

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret
signs of incipient trouble when they do appear,
especially if it has worked well in the past.
again.... it is not clear... executive or action....

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting them when they do
appear.
Executives...... the question was for an executive....

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past,
'one that' refers to action correctly

is likely to make an executive miss signs of
incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they
do appear
'they refers to signs correctly
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What's the answer & why? SC from OG [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2010, 02:37
Can anyone please! correct it and also explain the correct answer?
I dunno the OA :(
But according to the person who asked the question, it is from OG.


Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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Re: What's the answer & why? SC from OG [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2010, 08:05
E seems like the best choice.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
It's not clear who or what is missing signs of trouble.

B. An executive makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
Cutting out the modifying clauses from the middle of this sentence shows that this choice doesn't make sense.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
What worked well in the past? Trouble? Signs?

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
There's no plural antecedent to which them could refer.
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 May 2010, 07:37
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of
action, especially if it has worked well in the past,
makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or
misinterpret them when they do appear.

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear.

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action, especially one that worked well
in the past, makes missing signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret
signs of incipient trouble when they do appear,
especially if it has worked well in the past.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting them when they do
appear.

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past,
is likely to make an executive miss signs of
incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they
do appear.

I could just look at the questions:( help me to get it plz
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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 24 May 2010, 04:33
I always start by looking at the differences between answer choices.

You can typically drop words in between the , ' s to make the reading more simple.

Does that help you get started?

For example choice B)

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action, ... , makes missing signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.

The executive doesn't make missing signs. Unless he works for the FBI. This construction is not logical. So we can eliminate B)
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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 24 May 2010, 05:12
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I think I have seen it before. IMO E.
Please underline the part.

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
It - no clear referrent (commitment or action)
Similarly for THEM. After removing the middleman, sentence looks awkward:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Who is to miss the signs? :shock: Incorrect.


(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

Similar to A. No clear referrent for ONE. Remove the middleman:
An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

Exec misses the signs or makes missing signs. Meaning is modified. Incorrect.


(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

especially if it has worked well in the past is misplaced modifier. It should be adjacent to the action, the noun being modified. Incorrect.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

Executives’ being - incorrect usage.
THEM is incorrectly used for possesive [i]Executives’ being
. Incorrect.[/i]

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Though, we have BEING used here, but still rest of the part are correct as per usage. Let's remove the middleman:
Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Correct.

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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 25 May 2010, 03:54
(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

especially if it has worked well in the past is misplaced modifier. It should be adjacent to the action, the noun being modified. Incorrect.


CAn you just examine on C plz? i understood the other ones by removing middle man but this one i cant get it?
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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 26 May 2010, 07:20
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(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

My 2 cents:
1. especially if it has worked well in the past is misplaced modifier. It should be adjacent to the action, the noun being modified.

2. There is no clear referrent for it: incipient trouble OR a course of action

3. If you read closely, you will find that the meaning comes out as:
A heavily commited executive will miss the signs of trouble. This is not the stated meaning of original sentence. The original sentence shows that the heavy commitment makes an exec to miss signs...

So, C is Incorrect. Hope you get these concepts.
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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 26 May 2010, 07:23
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Go through my post. May be you can shop some more grammar fundamentals.

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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 28 May 2010, 09:03
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - 'it' has no referent.

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. - 'makes missing' is totally awkward. The sentence as a whole makes no sense.

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. - The clause after the comma seems hanging.....cant figure out what it is referring to.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. - 'being is a problem here'. 'them' has no referent. "Executives’" is possessive and 'them' is incorrect here.

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - Though the word 'Being' is used, the sentence as a whole makes sense. "especially one that has worked well in the past" correctly describes "course of action". executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them (signs) when they (signs) do appear (correct)
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 15 Sep 2010, 20:57
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

As a rule i knew that in GMAT , 'Being' should never be used. But here it seems an exception. Could anyone please explain what is correct ans and why?
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive [#permalink] New post 16 Sep 2010, 06:08
I arrived at E by removing the middle part of each sentence 'especially if it has worked well in the past' and checking whether the sentence is correct without the middle part. But that is not the best way to solve SC problems so lets look at each of them in detail.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action........makes it likely to...
It does not have a clear antecedent.

B. An executive...makes missing signs ... or misinterpreting ones likely.
Ones does not have a clear antecedent.

C ,especially if it has worked well in the past.
It does not have a clear antecedent. Also, this sentence isnt well formed.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed ...makes them likely to
Badly formed.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action..... is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
This seems to be the best answer. It is well formed.
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2010, 16:31
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2010, 16:50
E

I remember getting this question wrong before on OG.

I'm glad that I got this one right this time.

A. it, them a couple ambiguous pronouns.
B. one can be referring to either an executive or a course of action.
C. Listing Cause first then result after would've worked better, and use of pronouns they and it make the sentence unclear.
D. Them cannot be referring to the possessive executives, and being makes the sentence wordy and awkward.

E. Cause and effect relationship is clear, and use of pronouns one and they are correct.
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2010, 17:55
One thing I have noticed is that being is almost always wrong when used to modify a noun.

Noun being.....

However, this is a different case.
I have seen two or three questions in which correct answer included a present participle used as an independent subject noun, so I don't cross out an answer choices with 'being' right away unless they give you another choice that has no grammatical error and is more concise.

Being makes sentences wordy, but there's nothing wrong grammatically.

MGMAT's GMC rule says grammar first, then meaning, and finally concision.
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 10 May 2011, 10:19
This is a though one, Below link has good explainnation
http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/hea ... t3173.html
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Does someone have a better strategy here than elimination by [#permalink] New post 26 Jun 2011, 23:21
Does someone have a better strategy here than elimination by pronoun?


Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of
action, especially if it has worked well in the past,
makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or
misinterpret them when they do appear.



(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear.
(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action, especially one that worked well
in the past, makes missing signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.
(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret
signs of incipient trouble when they do appear,
especially if it has worked well in the past.
(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting them when they do
appear.
(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past,
is likely to make an executive miss signs of
incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they
do appear.
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 27 Jun 2011, 16:10
The original is full of pronoun issues, I'm not sure there needs to be any thing else wrong to quickly eliminate it. The remaining questions vary in correcting some of part of the issues, or introducing meaning problems, and just incoherent sentences.

A - "heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action". Wordy, awkward.
- "makes it likely to miss", who is it and why is it more likely to miss?
B - "misinterpreting ones". Wrong usage.
C - "it" is very ambiguous
D - doesn't make sense
E - ok.


Clear E.
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 04 Sep 2011, 23:42
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Kind of difficult to trace any errors on this..Any detailed explanations with anybody for this one..This is OG 12 problem after all..


Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear.

  • First bit just doesn’t sound right ‘commitment by’. Typically out “commit to” something.
  • It – what does this refer to, the heavy commitment? Ok…
  • Makes it likely to miss – this doesn’t make sense. What is “it” here?

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.
  • The executive makes missing signs? Incorrect
  • Incorrect usage of ones

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
  • “it” can refer to signs or course of action
  • I would hold this as a contender though, but it’s still just quite ambiguous. I expect we can find something better. I wouldn't feel bad at all if I picked this in test conditions.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
  • Apostrophe doesn’t work here
  • Incorrect usage of being
  • “It” doesn’t make sense now
  • Lack of parallelism of miss and misinterpreting

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
  • Being works here. What is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble? “being heavily committed….”
  • All good

e)
_________________

My Debrief

Re: Heavy commitment   [#permalink] 04 Sep 2011, 23:42
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