Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 22 Nov 2014, 15:48

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
8 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Apr 2004
Posts: 137
Location: Corea
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 114 [8] , given: 0

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 15:48
8
This post received
KUDOS
19
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Jun 2011
Posts: 159
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 15

Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2011, 01:19

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear.
Ambiguous pronouns
(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action, especially one that worked well
in the past, makes missing signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret
signs of incipient trouble when they do appear,
especially if it has worked well in the past.

wrong modifier as if the troble worked well in past

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting
them when they do
appear.

parallel construction error
(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past,
is likely to make an executive miss signs of
incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they
do appear
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 23 Jul 2011
Posts: 200
Concentration: Finance, Technology
Schools: UCSD (D)
GMAT 1: 640 Q44 V34
GPA: 2.99
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [1] , given: 66

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2012, 13:37
1
This post received
KUDOS
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Can someone break down each Answer Choice for me and Break this sentence down?

THanks in advance your help is sincerely appreciated.
2 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2010
Posts: 397
Location: United States
Concentration: General Management, Finance
GMAT 1: 680 Q50 V32
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 60 [2] , given: 13

Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2012, 00:22
2
This post received
KUDOS
My POE went like this.

A. ???
B. Changes the meaning to executive as the main subject. WRONG
C. Changes the meaning to executive as the main subject. WRONG
D. “makes them”? Executive’s is a possessive form. Executive itself is singular. WRONG
E. ????

So, between A and E:

1) X makes it likely to miss signs vs. is likely to make an etc.
2) what does IT refer to the original sentence? Ask the question makes what?

So, Answer is E.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Jan 2010
Posts: 193
Location: Germany
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
Schools: IE '15 (M)
GMAT 1: Q V
GPA: 3
WE: Consulting (Telecommunications)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 22 [0], given: 7

Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2012, 00:33
Quote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


An executive commits him/herself to a course of action, (mostly because) he has had good experience in the past, but this course of action makes it likely to miss signs.

"Especially if..." is a sub-sentence of "Heavy commitment by..." and this commitment tends to result in effects

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. Passive, not clear what makes it likely to miss...
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. Awkward
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. change of meaning, executive is likely to miss...especially if it has worked well
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. Executives´ should be avoided, plural, Verb-Agreement
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. Correct, sentence modifies correct
4 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
Status: Enjoying the GMAT journey....
Joined: 26 Aug 2011
Posts: 735
Location: India
GMAT 1: 620 Q49 V24
Followers: 63

Kudos [?]: 304 [4] , given: 264

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2012, 04:06
4
This post received
KUDOS
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
first step is to understand the logical meaning of the sentence, so let's break the sentence
Heavy commitment by an executive to something(a course of action) will make him likely to miss signs of trouble.....thus the state of being heavily committed is causing the individual to miss signs of.... when they do reappear
gmatpunjabi wrote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

especially if it has worked well in the past....IT here is an ambiguous pronoun, it mat refer to heavy commitment or executive or course of action

makes it likely....it has ambiguous antecedent, it may refer to executive( being closer than Heavy commitment) or Heavy commitment

gmatpunjabi wrote:
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

awkward( rather qualifies for the example of awkward sentences...

gmatpunjabi wrote:
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

It's not the executive is likely to miss but it's the heavy commitment which is making him miss( that's what the original sentence meant to say)

gmatpunjabi wrote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

them has no antecedent as Executives’ is in possessive form...poorly written

gmatpunjabi wrote:
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
correct
also one thing to note that being is not always incorrect...
:)
_________________

Fire the final bullet only when you are constantly hitting the Bull's eye, till then KEEP PRACTICING.

A WAY TO INCREASE FROM QUANT 35-40 TO 47 : a-way-to-increase-from-q35-40-to-q-138750.html

Q 47/48 To Q 50 + the-final-climb-quest-for-q-50-from-q47-129441.html#p1064367

Three good RC strategies three-different-strategies-for-attacking-rc-127287.html

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 18 Sep 2009
Posts: 373
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 101 [0], given: 2

gmat prep [#permalink] New post 21 Feb 2012, 09:20
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

narrowed between C and E. finally choose C because of "being" in option E. can somebody explain C in detail.particularly pronoun reference
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 18 Sep 2009
Posts: 373
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 101 [0], given: 2

Re: gmat prep [#permalink] New post 21 Feb 2012, 11:20
Can you explain pronoun reference in option C for " it". according to mgmat sc antecedant to a pronoun must act as a noun in that sentence. I read in other forums that antecedant for pronoun " it" can refer either to a "course of action" or " inicipent trouble". but both of them acted as objects of preposition. Experts please provide detail explanation and suggest me any other material for pronoun reference
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Sep 2011
Posts: 206
GMAT 1: Q V
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 33 [0], given: 5

Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2012, 08:14
I have chosen E for this question:

A. This sentence is in passive voice - usually incorrect. Also, the pronoun "it" is ambiguous and leads to confusion because we're not sure what "it" refers to.

B. In this case, the subject should be "heavy commitment" because it is the commitment that makes the executive prone to missing or misinterpreting signs. Instead, this sentence seems to suggest that the executive makes missing or misinterpreting signs likely. This sentence just seems a bit confusing to me.

C. The modifier "especially..." is misplaced. Since it is placed at the end of the sentence, I'm not too sure what it modifies. The pronoun "it" is also ambiguous in this case.

D. Executives' being is already an awkward way to start the sentence. Furthermore, the use of the pronoun "them" is not possessive, so it doesn't correctly refer back to executives. Also, parallelism is broken here because of "to miss... or misinterpreting." This should actually be "to miss...or misinterpret."

E. Although "being" is usually incorrect on the GMAT, it seems to be correct in this case. It clearly demonstrates the meaning of the sentence by saying that the commitment from the executives has led to to miss or misinterpret signs of trouble.
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Jun 2011
Posts: 8
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [1] , given: 0

Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2012, 21:47
1
This post received
KUDOS
Explanation:
The original sentence means that:
“Heavy commitment by an executive makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. “
X makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

This sentence is ambiguous because it does not make it clear who is missing and misinterpreting the incipient trouble. Is it the “Heavy commitment” or “an executive”?

E makes it clear:

Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Here it is clear that it is the executive who will miss or misinterpret the incipient trouble. Also, “especially one that has worked well in the past” has perfectly modified the “course of action”.

Also, “Being heavily committed to a course of action” is a simple gerund. So finally the sentence is as follows:
X is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Status: Preparing for the another shot...!
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1425
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
Followers: 132

Kudos [?]: 668 [1] , given: 62

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2012, 11:51
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
gmatpunjabi wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Can someone break down each Answer Choice for me and Break this sentence down?

THanks in advance your help is sincerely appreciated.



A) here the pronoun is pointing towards "course of action". This is incorrect because "course of action" cannot miss signs.( try to understand the meaning). The pronoun should be such that it points towards the executive.
B) subject is->" an executive"
Problem with this option is parallelism on both sides of parallel marker "or". One one side there is a complex gerund phrase (missing signs of incipient trouble) and on the other side there is simple gerund phrase (misinterpreting). The complex gerund phrase can never be parallel to simple gerund phrase.
Always remember.
C) "it" has no antecedent
D) the possesiveness implies that something of executives is heavily committed to a course of action and this something of executive misses signs. Also, the two either sides of the parallel marked "or" are not parallel.
E) IMO there isn't any issue with this option.

Don't ever think that being sentences are always wrong. As mentioned earlier, this wrong concept can murder us on D day.
Good luck.
:D
_________________

Prepositional Phrases Clarified|Elimination of BEING| Absolute Phrases Clarified
Rules For Posting
www.Univ-Scholarships.com

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: SLOGGING : My son says,This time Papa u will have to make it : Innocence is BLISS
Joined: 16 Jan 2012
Posts: 211
Location: India
Schools: IIMC (I), IIM
WE: Sales (Energy and Utilities)
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 30

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 29 Aug 2012, 13:30
Clearing the traffic snarl that unnecessarly prevents from getting to the core : The reduced stem of each option takes an appearance as below :

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action......makes it likely to miss signs... : IT problem --------- Elimination zone

B. An executive..... makes missing signs.....likely when they do appear : ( Does it makes any sense ? ) ---- Elimination zone

C. An executive .... is likely to miss signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, (especially if it has worked well in the past): the terminal modifier in brackets is wrongly placed,, in actual it should modify the course of action and should be in its vicinity ------ Elimination zone.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, makes them........ : Executives'- Them, SV disagreement = Elimination zone

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action..... is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble......when they do appear : Perfect

Leading to E, my take.
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 98
Location: India
GMAT Date: 10-25-2012
WE: Consulting (Computer Software)
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 45 [1] , given: 62

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2012, 04:22
1
This post received
KUDOS
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it (refers to??) likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.distorts the original meaning
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past(misplaced modifier-should modify "course of action").
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. (same problem as option A + passive)
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
_________________

if my post helped you, let me know by pressing Kudos...

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 May 2012
Posts: 7
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2012, 05:45
This is how I went about it ...hope it helps

A . original sentence which is grammatically incorrect
B. An executive who ......., makes missing signs - discontinuity in subject
C..... miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past - we are not talking of trouble having worked in the past .wrong
D. Executives’ .... makes them .... - original sentence refers to a 'single' executive hence wrong
E. Correct
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 03 Sep 2012
Posts: 339
Location: United States
Concentration: Healthcare, Strategy
GMAT 1: 730 Q48 V42
GPA: 3.88
WE: Medicine and Health (Health Care)
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 88 [0], given: 31

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2012, 10:56
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


The third part is awkward , what makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble ?? Is it the past ??

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.


B does not remove this ambiguity ..

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.


C says "especially if it has worked well in the past" , the signs of trouble ??? therefore it is as confusing and awkward as the earlier 2...

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.


Makes them likely to miss signs... makes who likely ?? the course of action ? or the executives ?? confusing and reflects poorly on construction ..

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


The first part talks of a course of action, the second one refers to that very course of action ... the third part claims that the course of action that has worked well in the past is likely to make an executive miss signs of trouble bla bla bla .. All the three are in order , and very little (if any ) room for confusion remains..

If we divide this passage (E) into 3 parts

Part one talks about a course of action ...Part two of that very course of action having worked on the past..Part three continues to talk about that very course of action and what negatives could arise by staying on that path .. Therefore everything is in order as it should be in a properly constructed sentence ... (E)

My 2 cents ..
_________________

"When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.” - Eric Thomas

Current Student
avatar
Status: Final Lap Up!!!
Affiliations: NYK Line
Joined: 21 Sep 2012
Posts: 1097
Location: India
GMAT 1: 410 Q35 V11
GMAT 2: 530 Q44 V20
GMAT 3: 630 Q45 V31
GPA: 3.84
WE: Engineering (Transportation)
Followers: 31

Kudos [?]: 286 [0], given: 67

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2012, 00:59
In option A, it is said to be ambiguous but its not clear why..........it said refer back to closest noun which is course of action.
As per the intended meaning "especially if it has worked well in the past", what has worked well in the past, its the course of action, than how is it ambigous.
Coming to second it in the option 'makes it likely to miss signs" now here i have a doubt, when i ask the question who misses the signs, answer should be "executives" but as per the rule it refers 'course of action".
Hence i think "it" is ambiguous.

pls help..............
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 Feb 2013
Posts: 6
GMAT 1: 730 Q49 V41
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 2

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 11 Feb 2013, 16:14
could you please explain hoe the modifier when they do appear is misplaced in the choice b??
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: struggling with GMAT
Joined: 06 Dec 2012
Posts: 307
Location: Bangladesh
Concentration: Accounting
GMAT Date: 04-06-2013
GPA: 3.65
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 130 [0], given: 46

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2013, 12:26
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Finding this question difficult for me.Need every option`s explanation
Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Breaking my head!!
Joined: 27 Jan 2013
Posts: 71
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Operations
GMAT 1: 740 Q50 V40
GPA: 3.51
WE: Other (Transportation)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 34

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2013, 21:22
mun23 wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Finding this question difficult for me.Need every option`s explanation


Here's my take on this:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - Incorrect It has no clear antecedent. It can refer to either 'Heavy commitment' or to a 'course of action'.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. - IncorrectThe last clause in the sentence incorrectly modifies An executive erroneously implying that the executive makes it more likely to miss signs :lol:
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.. - Incorrect Unclear in meaning, the last clause should have been just after 'a course of action'.
This would have been the correct form-
An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.- IncorrectThe apostrophe(') after Executive ruins the cake here here :wink: . This incorrect sentence seems to imply Something of Executives is heavily committed(which makes no sense) and 'them' now has no clear antecedent.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - Correct No problems here, which debunks the theory that BEING is automatically wrong on GMAT SC :)
IMO - E

Kudos where Kudos are due
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 07 Feb 2011
Posts: 89
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 21 [1] , given: 43

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2013, 03:49
1
This post received
KUDOS
AS
Pull up the answer choices as you read this
POE and lets see if we can "50/50" this

Easy eliminations
A-although you shouldn't really look at pronoun ambiguity as one of the first things (it shoul be one of the last in my experience) for me pronoun ambiguity is really blatant especially after 'it' is reused multiple times with multiple singular nouns that could take 'its' place. Also the clause ‘makes it likely to miss signs of incipient’ implies that an action is something sentient (which it isn't) makes it (the action) unlikely to see ‘trouble and misintepret’. The executive should be doing this. A person sees, a dog sees, actions definitely do NOT see and they don't miss seeing something either. So original sentence is wrong in meaning and grammar

B-makes signs likely (opposite of meaning) also ‘likely’ is modifying a noun ‘missing’. Noun modifiers, unlike verb modifiers should be closer to what they are modifying (‘missing’)

D- ‘executives’ being heavily committed’ is a noun…’makes them likely’. Commitment dosn't make anything likely or unlikely, an executive/his actions do. Wrong

Now C vs E:

C- What is that final hanging modifier modifying. What is the especially modifying? It is an adverbial modifier, modifying 'something'= the entire clause before it. This means that the final 'especially' clause incorrectly implies the missing signs and intepretations have 'worked well in the past'


E nothing wrong gramatically, a little wordy, but doesn't have any meaning or modifier errors

Hoped it helped

Key takeaways: Look at the meaning of the sentence. What is the pronoun and demonstrative in a sentence (that, which, it) referring firstly in meaning and then in grammar. What are modifiers such as 'likely' 'especially' modifying, and what type of modifiers are they (since this dictates how close they should be to the modified). Always start big and go small. Look at the meaning of the sentence first THEN work out kinks and ambiguities with the grammar

Kudos me up. My first explanation on OG
_________________

We appreciate your kudos'

Expert Post
GMAT Pill Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 14 Apr 2009
Posts: 1644
Location: New York, NY
Followers: 298

Kudos [?]: 723 [0], given: 6

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2013, 14:08
Expert's post
You can see a video explanation here: http://www.gmatpill.com/gmat-practice-t ... stion/2177

Note that usage of "who" in B and C is OK - the issue lies more in the structure of the remaining sentence.

(B) says that "an executive" makes "missing signs of incipient trouble" - which doesn't make sense.

With (C) - the phrase

"especially if it has worked well in the past."

We don't know what "it" refers to here. If anything - "it" should "they" - but even so the meaning of what follows doesn't make sense with the first half of (C).
_________________


... and more


Image What's Inside GMAT Pill?

Zeke Lee, GMAT Pill Study Method (Study Less. Score More.)


GMAT Pill Reviews | GMAT PILL Free Practice Test

Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,   [#permalink] 25 Mar 2013, 14:08
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, mojorising800 0 24 Jan 2010, 21:30
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, marcodonzelli 0 11 Feb 2008, 04:26
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, Jamesk486 0 05 Jun 2007, 14:56
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, okdongdong 0 30 Aug 2005, 18:36
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, nocilis 0 12 Mar 2005, 15:40
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6   7    Next  [ 123 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.