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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 15:48
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Question Stats:

45% (02:08) correct 55% (01:18) wrong based on 1109 sessions
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2005, 11:58
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Why did eveybody think E is wrong? - Is that because it uses "being"?

Here "Being heavily committed " is used as a Gerund just as the Gerund Sleeping in the following sentence.

"Sleeping at work is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear."

which is correct.

OA is E :wink:
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Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2012, 04:06
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
first step is to understand the logical meaning of the sentence, so let's break the sentence
Heavy commitment by an executive to something(a course of action) will make him likely to miss signs of trouble.....thus the state of being heavily committed is causing the individual to miss signs of.... when they do reappear
gmatpunjabi wrote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

especially if it has worked well in the past....IT here is an ambiguous pronoun, it mat refer to heavy commitment or executive or course of action

makes it likely....it has ambiguous antecedent, it may refer to executive( being closer than Heavy commitment) or Heavy commitment

gmatpunjabi wrote:
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

awkward( rather qualifies for the example of awkward sentences...

gmatpunjabi wrote:
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

It's not the executive is likely to miss but it's the heavy commitment which is making him miss( that's what the original sentence meant to say)

gmatpunjabi wrote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

them has no antecedent as Executives’ is in possessive form...poorly written

gmatpunjabi wrote:
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
correct
also one thing to note that being is not always incorrect...
:)
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 23:06
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'especially worked well in the past' is redundant. It's simply there to describe the course of action. So we can narrow down the sentence to:

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

E seems to be the best of the lot in correcting this sentence. Again, removing 'especialy worked well in the past' gives us

Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. --> 'They' modifies signs of trouble

E for me.
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2009, 18:12
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Dear All,

This question is #101 of the 12th ed OG, and the official explanation can be found at page 736.

This sentence explains that an executive who is blindly committed to a proven course of action is likely to overlook or misinterpret indicators that the plan may no longer be working. The sentence needs to make clear who may misinterpret these indicators.

(A) The passive construction causes the sentence to be wordy and confusing; the reference for it is ambiguous, leaving hte reader with questions about who or what is likely to miss these signs.

(B) The sentence structure indicates that the executive,not his or her strategy, causes signs to be overlooked; the modifier when they do appear is misplaced.

(C) The reference for the pronoun it is unclear because many nouns have intervened between the appearance of the logical referent (course of action) and it.

(D) Misinterpreting should be an infinitive verb form to parallel miss; the phrasing throughout the sentence is wordy and akward.

(E) Correct. The grammatical structure of this sentence and the appropriate palcement of modifiers expreses the meaning clearly and concisely.
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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 24 May 2010, 05:12
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I think I have seen it before. IMO E.
Please underline the part.

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
It - no clear referrent (commitment or action)
Similarly for THEM. After removing the middleman, sentence looks awkward:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Who is to miss the signs? :shock: Incorrect.


(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

Similar to A. No clear referrent for ONE. Remove the middleman:
An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

Exec misses the signs or makes missing signs. Meaning is modified. Incorrect.


(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

especially if it has worked well in the past is misplaced modifier. It should be adjacent to the action, the noun being modified. Incorrect.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

Executives’ being - incorrect usage.
THEM is incorrectly used for possesive [i]Executives’ being
. Incorrect.[/i]

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Though, we have BEING used here, but still rest of the part are correct as per usage. Let's remove the middleman:
Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Correct.

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Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2012, 00:22
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My POE went like this.

A. ???
B. Changes the meaning to executive as the main subject. WRONG
C. Changes the meaning to executive as the main subject. WRONG
D. “makes them”? Executive’s is a possessive form. Executive itself is singular. WRONG
E. ????

So, between A and E:

1) X makes it likely to miss signs vs. is likely to make an etc.
2) what does IT refer to the original sentence? Ask the question makes what?

So, Answer is E.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2005, 05:45
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Ritesh, I actually believe that "Being heavily committed to a course of action" in E serves as a noun phrase and as a subject, not as a modifier.

(The state of) being heavily comitted is likely to cause ...
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2007, 19:35
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. => "it" what commitment / course of action ?

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. => "it" / wordy

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. => wordy

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Between A & E
I will go with E the best fit !!
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Re: CR OG [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2010, 21:54
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ichha148 wrote:
Why is being required in E ?


here being is a gerund and is part of the subject of the sentence.
Consider this another example of a GMAT problem in which being is used correctly


Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear

being genetically engineered does not make a plant any more likely to become an invasive or persistent weed, according to a decade-long study published in the journal Nature


These two sentences have basically the same structure. Being is a gerund and part of the subject

Now consider this other problem OG #110 verbal review second edition

Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee has lived in England and Canada, and first came to the United States in 1961 to study at the Iowa Writers' Workshop

According to OG being is wordy here.


So the lesson you can learn from these is problems is the following

if being is a gerund that forms part of the subject ---> OK
if being modifies a noun and is not passive voice ---> wrong

now try to look for other uses of being in OFFICIAL PROBLEMS and extract more rules, I write down the examples in your notes.

if you do this for every SC concept, you'll learn a lot.
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Re: SC OG [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2010, 05:09
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silasaaa2 wrote:
Can someone please post the explanations from official guide for all the answer choices

Th is sentence explains that an executive who is
blindly committed to a proven course of action is
likely to overlook or misinterpret indicators that
the plan may no longer be working. Th e sentence
needs to make clear who may misinterpret these
indicators.
A Th e passive construction causes the sentence
to be wordy and confusing; the reference for
it is ambiguous, leaving the reader with
questions about who or what is likely to miss
these signs.
B Th e sentence structure indicates that the
executive, not his or her strategy, causes signs
to be overlooked; the modifi er when they do
appear is misplaced.
C Th e reference for the pronoun it is unclear
because many nouns have intervened
between the appearance of the logical
referent (course of action) and it.
D Misinterpreting should be an infi nitive verb
form to parallel miss; the phrasing
throughout the sentence is wordy and
awkward.
E Correct. Th e grammatical structure of this
sentence and the appropriate placement of
modifi ers expresses the meaning clearly and
concisely.
Th e correct answer is E.
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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 26 May 2010, 07:20
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(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

My 2 cents:
1. especially if it has worked well in the past is misplaced modifier. It should be adjacent to the action, the noun being modified.

2. There is no clear referrent for it: incipient trouble OR a course of action

3. If you read closely, you will find that the meaning comes out as:
A heavily commited executive will miss the signs of trouble. This is not the stated meaning of original sentence. The original sentence shows that the heavy commitment makes an exec to miss signs...

So, C is Incorrect. Hope you get these concepts.
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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 26 May 2010, 07:23
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Go through my post. May be you can shop some more grammar fundamentals.

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Re: Sentence Correction.confusing (700+) [#permalink] New post 28 May 2010, 09:03
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - 'it' has no referent.

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. - 'makes missing' is totally awkward. The sentence as a whole makes no sense.

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. - The clause after the comma seems hanging.....cant figure out what it is referring to.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. - 'being is a problem here'. 'them' has no referent. "Executives’" is possessive and 'them' is incorrect here.

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - Though the word 'Being' is used, the sentence as a whole makes sense. "especially one that has worked well in the past" correctly describes "course of action". executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them (signs) when they (signs) do appear (correct)
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Re: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 04 Sep 2011, 23:42
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OptimusPrimea1 wrote:
Kind of difficult to trace any errors on this..Any detailed explanations with anybody for this one..This is OG 12 problem after all..


Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear.

  • First bit just doesn’t sound right ‘commitment by’. Typically out “commit to” something.
  • It – what does this refer to, the heavy commitment? Ok…
  • Makes it likely to miss – this doesn’t make sense. What is “it” here?

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.
  • The executive makes missing signs? Incorrect
  • Incorrect usage of ones

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
  • “it” can refer to signs or course of action
  • I would hold this as a contender though, but it’s still just quite ambiguous. I expect we can find something better. I wouldn't feel bad at all if I picked this in test conditions.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
  • Apostrophe doesn’t work here
  • Incorrect usage of being
  • “It” doesn’t make sense now
  • Lack of parallelism of miss and misinterpreting

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
  • Being works here. What is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble? “being heavily committed….”
  • All good

e)
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2012, 13:37
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Can someone break down each Answer Choice for me and Break this sentence down?

THanks in advance your help is sincerely appreciated.
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Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2012, 21:47
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Explanation:
The original sentence means that:
“Heavy commitment by an executive makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. “
X makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

This sentence is ambiguous because it does not make it clear who is missing and misinterpreting the incipient trouble. Is it the “Heavy commitment” or “an executive”?

E makes it clear:

Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Here it is clear that it is the executive who will miss or misinterpret the incipient trouble. Also, “especially one that has worked well in the past” has perfectly modified the “course of action”.

Also, “Being heavily committed to a course of action” is a simple gerund. So finally the sentence is as follows:
X is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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Re: Heavy Commitment. Whats going on with this one?? [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2012, 11:51
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gmatpunjabi wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Can someone break down each Answer Choice for me and Break this sentence down?

THanks in advance your help is sincerely appreciated.



A) here the pronoun is pointing towards "course of action". This is incorrect because "course of action" cannot miss signs.( try to understand the meaning). The pronoun should be such that it points towards the executive.
B) subject is->" an executive"
Problem with this option is parallelism on both sides of parallel marker "or". One one side there is a complex gerund phrase (missing signs of incipient trouble) and on the other side there is simple gerund phrase (misinterpreting). The complex gerund phrase can never be parallel to simple gerund phrase.
Always remember.
C) "it" has no antecedent
D) the possesiveness implies that something of executives is heavily committed to a course of action and this something of executive misses signs. Also, the two either sides of the parallel marked "or" are not parallel.
E) IMO there isn't any issue with this option.

Don't ever think that being sentences are always wrong. As mentioned earlier, this wrong concept can murder us on D day.
Good luck.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2012, 04:22
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it (refers to??) likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.distorts the original meaning
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past(misplaced modifier-should modify "course of action").
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. (same problem as option A + passive)
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2013, 03:49
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Pull up the answer choices as you read this
POE and lets see if we can "50/50" this

Easy eliminations
A-although you shouldn't really look at pronoun ambiguity as one of the first things (it shoul be one of the last in my experience) for me pronoun ambiguity is really blatant especially after 'it' is reused multiple times with multiple singular nouns that could take 'its' place. Also the clause ‘makes it likely to miss signs of incipient’ implies that an action is something sentient (which it isn't) makes it (the action) unlikely to see ‘trouble and misintepret’. The executive should be doing this. A person sees, a dog sees, actions definitely do NOT see and they don't miss seeing something either. So original sentence is wrong in meaning and grammar

B-makes signs likely (opposite of meaning) also ‘likely’ is modifying a noun ‘missing’. Noun modifiers, unlike verb modifiers should be closer to what they are modifying (‘missing’)

D- ‘executives’ being heavily committed’ is a noun…’makes them likely’. Commitment dosn't make anything likely or unlikely, an executive/his actions do. Wrong

Now C vs E:

C- What is that final hanging modifier modifying. What is the especially modifying? It is an adverbial modifier, modifying 'something'= the entire clause before it. This means that the final 'especially' clause incorrectly implies the missing signs and intepretations have 'worked well in the past'


E nothing wrong gramatically, a little wordy, but doesn't have any meaning or modifier errors

Hoped it helped

Key takeaways: Look at the meaning of the sentence. What is the pronoun and demonstrative in a sentence (that, which, it) referring firstly in meaning and then in grammar. What are modifiers such as 'likely' 'especially' modifying, and what type of modifiers are they (since this dictates how close they should be to the modified). Always start big and go small. Look at the meaning of the sentence first THEN work out kinks and ambiguities with the grammar

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,   [#permalink] 25 Mar 2013, 03:49
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