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Historian: Alexander the Great should not be judged by

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Historian: Alexander the Great should not be judged by [#permalink] New post 17 Dec 2003, 09:44
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A
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E

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Historian: Alexander the Great should not be judged by appeal to current notions of justice. Alexander, an ancient figure of heroic stature, should be judged by the standards of his own culture. That is, did he live up to his culture's ideals of leadership? Did Alexander elevate the contemporary standards of justice? Was he, in his day, judged to be a just and wise ruler?

Student: But you cannot tell whether or not Alexander raised the contemporary standards of justice without invoking standards other than those of his own culture.

Which one of the following argumentative strategies does the student use in responding to the historian?

(A) arguing that applying the historian's principle would require a knowledge of the past that is necessarily inaccessible to current scholarship

(B) attempting to undermine the historian's principle by showing that some of its consequences are inconsistent with each other

(C) showing that the principle the historian invokes, when applied to Alexander, does not justify the assertion that he was heroic

(D) questioning the historian's motivation for determining whether a standard of behavior has been raised or lowered

(E) claiming that one of the historian's criteria for judging Alexander is inconsistent with the principle that the historian has advanced
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Dec 2003, 11:13
E..
students disagree with one of the assertions
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Dec 2003, 06:29
:yes , E
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Re: CR - Historian [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2008, 03:19
friends - this is a typical ambigous lsat one ... can someone explain the difference between A and E (OA) ?

many thanks
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Re: CR - Historian [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2008, 06:23
Historian: Alexander the Great should not be judged by appeal to current notions of justice. Alexander, an ancient figure of heroic stature, should be judged by the standards of his own culture. That is, did he live up to his culture's ideals of leadership? Did Alexander elevate the contemporary standards of justice? Was he, in his day, judged to be a just and wise ruler?

Student: But you cannot tell whether or not Alexander raised the contemporary standards of justice without invoking standards other than those of his own culture.

Which one of the following argumentative strategies does the student use in responding to the historian?

(A) arguing that applying the historian's principle would require a knowledge of the past that is necessarily inaccessible to current scholarship
The argument here is about contemporary justice(during alexander's times) ..not justice prior to this time.

(E) claiming that one of the historian's criteria for judging Alexander is inconsistent with the principle that the historian has advanced

Student argues that Historian should take Standards of justice during alexanders times should take other cultures also into consideration. not just his(alexanders) own to determine whether he actually raised the contemporary. standards.

E suits the best.
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Re: CR - Historian [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2008, 10:59
asandeep wrote:
Historian: Alexander the Great should not be judged by appeal to current notions of justice. Alexander, an ancient figure of heroic stature, should be judged by the standards of his own culture. That is, did he live up to his culture's ideals of leadership? Did Alexander elevate the contemporary standards of justice? Was he, in his day, judged to be a just and wise ruler?

Student: But you cannot tell whether or not Alexander raised the contemporary standards of justice without invoking standards other than those of his own culture.

Which one of the following argumentative strategies does the student use in responding to the historian?

(A) arguing that applying the historian's principle would require a knowledge of the past that is necessarily inaccessible to current scholarship

(B) attempting to undermine the historian's principle by showing that some of its consequences are inconsistent with each other

(C) showing that the principle the historian invokes, when applied to Alexander, does not justify the assertion that he was heroic

(D) questioning the historian's motivation for determining whether a standard of behavior has been raised or lowered

(E) claiming that one of the historian's criteria for judging Alexander is inconsistent with the principle that the historian has advanced


I got E to.

What is the Historian stating?

According to the historian, Alexander should not be judged by present day nations of justice, rather should be judged by standards of his culture during his time and one of the criteria should be whether He (Alexander) did elevate contemporary standards of justice.

However the student, attacks his claim by pointing to a flaw in the Historian's claim (i.e. But you cannot tell whether or not Alexander ........)

E fits this perfectly.

(A) arguing that applying the historian's principle would require a knowledge of the past that is necessarily inaccessible to current scholarship - It is not stated anywhere that access to any knowledge is inaccesible. Out of scope.

(B) attempting to undermine the historian's principle by showing that some of its consequences are inconsistent with each other - Incorrect because The student does not state any consequence let alone several (some)

C is out of scope

D Also out of scope.
Re: CR - Historian   [#permalink] 23 Jun 2008, 10:59
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