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Historians of North American architecture who have studied

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Senior Manager
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Historians of North American architecture who have studied [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2007, 22:50
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A
B
C
D
E

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Historians of North American architecture who have studied early nineteenth-century houses with wooden floors have observed that the boards used on the floors of bigger houses were generally much narrower than those used on the floors of smaller houses. These historians have argued that, since the people for whom the bigger houses were built were generally richer than the people for whom the smaller houses were built, floors made out of narrow floorboards were probably once a status symbol, designed to proclaim the owner’s wealth.
Which one of the following, if true, most helps to strengthen the historians’ argument?
(A) More original floorboards have survived from big early nineteenth-century houses than from small early nineteenth-century houses.
(B) In the early nineteenth century, a piece of narrow floorboard was not significantly less expensive than a piece of wide floorboard of the same length.
(C) In the early nineteenth century, smaller houses generally had fewer rooms than did bigger houses.
(D) Some early nineteenth-century houses had wide floorboards near the walls of each room and narrower floorboards in the center, where the floors were usually carpeted.
(E) Many of the biggest early nineteenth-century houses but very few small houses from that period had some floors that were made of materials that were considerably more expensive than wood, such as marble.

I picked the wrong answer because I was not fully conviced with the correct answer's reasoning...
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Re: Easy one-CR: wooden floor [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2007, 22:58
gmacvik wrote:
Historians of North American architecture who have studied early nineteenth-century houses with wooden floors have observed that the boards used on the floors of bigger houses were generally much narrower than those used on the floors of smaller houses. These historians have argued that, since the people for whom the bigger houses were built were generally richer than the people for whom the smaller houses were built, floors made out of narrow floorboards were probably once a status symbol, designed to proclaim the owner’s wealth.
Which one of the following, if true, most helps to strengthen the historians’ argument?
(A) More original floorboards have survived from big early nineteenth-century houses than from small early nineteenth-century houses.
(B) In the early nineteenth century, a piece of narrow floorboard was not significantly less expensive than a piece of wide floorboard of the same length.
(C) In the early nineteenth century, smaller houses generally had fewer rooms than did bigger houses.
(D) Some early nineteenth-century houses had wide floorboards near the walls of each room and narrower floorboards in the center, where the floors were usually carpeted.
(E) Many of the biggest early nineteenth-century houses but very few small houses from that period had some floors that were made of materials that were considerably more expensive than wood, such as marble.

I picked the wrong answer because I was not fully conviced with the correct answer's reasoning...


Lets say you want to cover 100 ft. of the floor(width). There are 2 options 100 narrow boards of 1ft width or 4 broad boards of 25 ft width.

If the big boards coasted $25 each and the narrow boards costed $1 each(i.e the narrow boards are significantly lower priced), then we can see that the total flooring costs were the same. Thus, the floor could not have been a status symbol.

For the conclusion to hold water, the narrow board cannot be significantly less priced than the wide board. This can be rephrased as

(B) In the early nineteenth century, a piece of narrow floorboard was not significantly less expensive than a piece of wide floorboard of the same length.

B is the assumption.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2007, 23:20
yep B
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2007, 01:59
I like B too...
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2007, 13:43
tricky but Ill go with B as well
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2007, 20:05
two negetives = positive
not significantly less expensive = expensive
(B)
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2007, 13:08
B
1. we may imply that narrow wood was more expensive
2. We can eliminate the other answers
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2007, 10:57
'B'

'Not signifacntly LESS expensive...' clearly means narrow floorboards were expensive.
  [#permalink] 17 Feb 2007, 10:57
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