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How about we start a collection for SC questions as well

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SVP
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How about we start a collection for SC questions as well [#permalink] New post 13 Mar 2005, 18:03
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How about we start a collection for SC questions as well?
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percent, number, fraction, some ... [#permalink] New post 13 Mar 2005, 18:04
percent, number, fraction, some ...

nocilis wrote:
X of Y
X: %, percent, number, fraction etc.
Y: subject

is a case where the combined subject is singular or plural, based on whether Y is singular or plural.

So,

A high percentage of the population _____is____ voting for the new school.

A high percentage of the people ____were_____ voting for the new school.

are the correct answers as population is a singular and people is a plural subject.

Some more examples:
10% of the students are not in the class (plural)
One third of the cake has been eaten (singular)

One more note:
The following words can result in either a singular or plural subject based on the subject it acts on

1) Some of :
Example:
Some of the cookies are missing - OK
Some of the cake is missing - OK

2)Any of

3)Most of

4)All of

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 [#permalink] New post 13 Mar 2005, 19:11
I'll add in stuff over a period, like what I'm doing for the math forum :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2005, 05:27
'THE NUMBER OF' Vs 'A NUMBER OF'

'The number of' always take a singular verb while 'A number of' always take a plural verb.

for eg-

The number of hardworking students in this class is quite large.

A number of students in this class are hard workers.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2005, 16:32
such vs like

Such is used to indicate examples. Like is used to indicate similarities.

E.g. (such)

The zoo has animals such as elephants, tigers and lions.
- such is used to list examples of animals kept in a zoo.

E.g. (like)

John, like his brother, enjoys going to the gym.
- like is used to indicate a similarity between John and his brother (going to the gym)
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Re: Useful things to know for SC: [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2005, 16:33
HongHu wrote:
How about we start a collection for SC questions as well?


you mean for the e-book ? :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2005, 23:24
Subject-Verb Agreement

Subject of a sentence and the verb must agree in number. Singular noun with singular verb modifying it, and plural noun with plural verb modifying the noun.

Identifying the subject/subject clause is therfore important.

E.g.

The discovery of new lands was vital to the expansion of the British Empire.

Subject - discovery (singular), verb - was (singular)
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2005, 23:28
Additive Phrases

‘and’ can unite two or more singular subjects, forming a compound plural subject.

Other additive phrases:
along with
In addition to
as well as
accompanied by
together with
Including

Only ‘and’ can form a compound subject. The other additive phrases do not form compound subjects.

E.g.

Wilfred and John are going to the beach.
Wilfred, along with John, is going to the beach.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2005, 23:34
Disjunctive phrases: Or, Either-or, Neither-nor

For disjunctive phrases with the use of ‘or’, ‘either-nor’ or ‘neither-nor’, find the subject nearest to the verb and make that verb agree in number with this subject.

E.g.

Neither Wilfred nor his friends are going to work.
Either his friends or Wilfred is going on a holiday.
Paul or GMAT members are allowed to attach documents to the forum.

Note:
When either or neither are in a sentence alone (without or/nor), they are not considered to be part of a disjunctive phrase. In such cases, they are considered singular and take only singular verbs.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2005, 23:45
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Indefinite Pronouns

An indefinite pronoun is one that is not specific about the thing to which it refers (no clear referent)

All pronouns that end in –one, -body or –thing are indefinite pronouns.

E.g.
Everyone, Everybody, Everything
Anyone, Anybody, Anything
Someone, Somebody, Something
No one, Nobody, Nothing

The following are also indefinite:
Whatever, whoever
Neither, Either
Each Every

All the indefinite pronouns are singular.

For each/every, if they precede a noun, the verb will take on a singular form as well.

E.g.

Each of the students is allowed to go on the field trip.
Every dog and cat has paws.

However, when each/every follow a subject, it has no bearing on the verb form.

E.g.
They each are good soccer players.

There are however 5 indefinite pronouns that can singular or plural depending on the subject

Some, Any, None, All, Most

E.g.
Some of my marbles are missing (subject: marbles, verb: are)
Most of the students are tired
None of my money is missing
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2005, 23:59
One last post today for this thread ....

Majority/Minority/Plurality: can be singular or plural depending on their context.

When they refer to the many parts of the totality, they are plural
When they refer to the totality itself they are singular

The majority of the members in GMATClub are going to score more than 700 in the GMAT.

The students majority is opposed to the new grade classification.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2005, 00:16
Good list.

Re: Mar 24 11:34 post supra do you mean either-or for this portion

"For disjunctive phrases with the use of ‘or’, ‘either-nor’ or ‘neither-nor’, find the subject nearest to the verb and make that verb agree in number with this subject."
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2005, 00:26
Hjort wrote:
Good list.

Re: Mar 24 11:34 post supra do you mean either-or for this portion

"For disjunctive phrases with the use of ‘or’, ‘either-nor’ or ‘neither-nor’, find the subject nearest to the verb and make that verb agree in number with this subject."


Either-or, Or, and Neither-nor all are part of disjunctive phrases. Such disjunctive phrases usually have two subjects, and to determine the form of the verb, whether it's plural or singular, depends on the noun nearest to the verb.

I'll give some more examples below:

Or
Boys or Girls are allowed to join the club.
The seven dwarves or snow white is going to have a party.

Either... or and Neither... nor
Either you or me is going to win the contest.
Neither you nor me is going to win the contest.

Either Jack or his friends are going home.
Neither Jack nor his friends are going home.
Either his friends or Jack is going home.
Neither his friends nor Jack is going home.

Last edited by ywilfred on 25 Mar 2005, 00:31, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: percent, number, fraction, some ... [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2005, 00:31
HongHu wrote:
percent, number, fraction, some ...

nocilis wrote:
X of Y
X: %, percent, number, fraction etc.
Y: subject

is a case where the combined subject is singular or plural, based on whether Y is singular or plural.

So,

A high percentage of the population _____is____ voting for the new school.

A high percentage of the people ____were_____ voting for the new school.

are the correct answers as population is a singular and people is a plural subject.

Some more examples:
10% of the students are not in the class (plural)
One third of the cake has been eaten (singular)

One more note:
The following words can result in either a singular or plural subject based on the subject it acts on

1) Some of :
Example:
Some of the cookies are missing - OK
Some of the cake is missing - OK

2)Any of

3)Most of

4)All of



I'll just touch on the last part of this ealier post. Some, Any, Most, All, None are all indefinite pronouns. To determine if these pronouns are singular or plural dependson the object of the 'of' construction.

Some of the girls (plural girls) are beautiful.
Some of the cake (singular cake)is eaten.

The two examples above applies for the indefinite pronouns I just mentioned.
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Subjunctive Mood [#permalink] New post 02 Apr 2005, 22:03
After the verb wish to indicate a situation which is unreal as in

He wishes the book belonged to you

If -- to express unreality in the present

If I were you I would read OG throughly

(it is time) + subject to imply it is late

It is time we started our preparation

would rather + subject -- to indicate preference

I would rather you sold the material

They would rather you paid them by cash
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Re: percent, number, fraction, some ... [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2005, 05:49
HongHu wrote:
percent, number, fraction, some ...

nocilis wrote:
X of Y
X: %, percent, number, fraction etc.
Y: subject

is a case where the combined subject is singular or plural, based on whether Y is singular or plural.

So,

A high percentage of the population _____is____ voting for the new school.

A high percentage of the people ____were_____ voting for the new school.

are the correct answers as population is a singular and people is a plural subject.

Some more examples:
10% of the students are not in the class (plural)
One third of the cake has been eaten (singular)

One more note:
The following words can result in either a singular or plural subject based on the subject it acts on

1) Some of :
Example:
Some of the cookies are missing - OK
Some of the cake is missing - OK

2)Any of

3)Most of

4)All of



Why is people a "plural" subject? I thought it was a collective noun? Could anyone please elaborate on why population is plural?

Also could someone elaborate on when a collective noun takes a plural form?

I've read the following but still cant seem to make sense of their examples:

http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/plur ... tive_nouns



regards,
gmataquaguy
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Re: percent, number, fraction, some ... [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2005, 19:38
gmataquaguy wrote:
HongHu wrote:
percent, number, fraction, some ...

nocilis wrote:
X of Y
X: %, percent, number, fraction etc.
Y: subject

is a case where the combined subject is singular or plural, based on whether Y is singular or plural.

So,

A high percentage of the population _____is____ voting for the new school.

A high percentage of the people ____were_____ voting for the new school.

are the correct answers as population is a singular and people is a plural subject.

Some more examples:
10% of the students are not in the class (plural)
One third of the cake has been eaten (singular)

One more note:
The following words can result in either a singular or plural subject based on the subject it acts on

1) Some of :
Example:
Some of the cookies are missing - OK
Some of the cake is missing - OK

2)Any of

3)Most of

4)All of



Why is people a "plural" subject? I thought it was a collective noun? Could anyone please elaborate on why population is plural?

Also could someone elaborate on when a collective noun takes a plural form?

I've read the following but still cant seem to make sense of their examples:

http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/plur ... tive_nouns



regards,
gmataquaguy


Why is people a "plural" subject?
The singular form of people is person. People is plural.
As to why it's this way , I don't really know. Your question is as good as asking why the plural form of 'car' is 'cars'. That's just the way the Grammar is ! :-D

Could anyone please elaborate on why population is plural?
Population refers to a group of people located in a region and so it is singular, not plural.

Also could someone elaborate on when a collective noun takes a plural form?
A collective noun always take a singular verb form.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2005, 19:41
You should note that a plural noun does not always means it takes a plural verb from.

Example:

Every dogs has paws.
Precede the subject with each/every, and it'll always take a singular verb.
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Re: percent, number, fraction, some ... [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2005, 22:03
ywilfred wrote:
gmataquaguy wrote:
HongHu wrote:
percent, number, fraction, some ...

nocilis wrote:
X of Y
X: %, percent, number, fraction etc.
Y: subject

is a case where the combined subject is singular or plural, based on whether Y is singular or plural.

So,

A high percentage of the population _____is____ voting for the new school.

A high percentage of the people ____were_____ voting for the new school.

are the correct answers as population is a singular and people is a plural subject.

Some more examples:
10% of the students are not in the class (plural)
One third of the cake has been eaten (singular)

One more note:
The following words can result in either a singular or plural subject based on the subject it acts on

1) Some of :
Example:
Some of the cookies are missing - OK
Some of the cake is missing - OK

2)Any of

3)Most of

4)All of



Why is people a "plural" subject? I thought it was a collective noun? Could anyone please elaborate on why population is plural?

Also could someone elaborate on when a collective noun takes a plural form?

I've read the following but still cant seem to make sense of their examples:

http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/plur ... tive_nouns



regards,
gmataquaguy


Why is people a "plural" subject?
The singular form of people is person. People is plural.
As to why it's this way , I don't really know. Your question is as good as asking why the plural form of 'car' is 'cars'. That's just the way the Grammar is ! :-D

Could anyone please elaborate on why population is plural?
Population refers to a group of people located in a region and so it is singular, not plural.

Also could someone elaborate on when a collective noun takes a plural form?
A collective noun always take a singular verb form.


A collective noun takes a plural verb when the statement is meant to refer to the individual entities within the collective noun

For Eg: The jury were stationed in the hotels around Chicago downtown.

In the above sentence, Jury is meant to refer to individual members within the jury.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2005, 22:29
I think this applies to quantitative words: majority/minority and plurality.

When we refer to the totality, we use a plural verb.

Example:
A majority of the students are diligent.

However, when we refer to the totality as a whole, we use a singular verb.

Example:
The student majority is opposed to the new grading system.
  [#permalink] 05 Apr 2005, 22:29
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