Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 24 Oct 2014, 02:30

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

How many integers n are there such that r < n < s? (1)

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 908
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

How many integers n are there such that r < n < s? (1) [#permalink] New post 29 Mar 2005, 18:37
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
How many integers n are there such that r < n < s?

(1) s-r = 5
(2) r and s are not integers

I am having a rough time with inequalities so explanation would be highly appreciated. Thanks
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 25 Nov 2004
Posts: 1497
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 31 [0], given: 0

Re: DS Inequality 3 [#permalink] New post 29 Mar 2005, 18:54
from (1), s could be any integer or any number so does r. n varies with the values of s or n.
from (2), it is clear that r and s are not integers but we do not know what are the values of r and s.

from 1 and 2 only we know that there are 5 integer values for n.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5095
Location: Singapore
Followers: 19

Kudos [?]: 155 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 29 Mar 2005, 19:15
1) s-r=5

n will always be 4 whatever the combination of r and s

S can be 6, r can be 1, n =4
S can be 12, r can be 7, n=4
S can be 100, r can be 95, n=4

So 1 is sufficient.

2) r and s are not integers
Clearly not sufficient.

r and be 33/2 and s=39/2, then n= 3
r can be 33/2 and s=43/2, then n= 4

So A is the answer.
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 18 Nov 2004
Posts: 1447
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 29 Mar 2005, 20:38
"C"...come on guys think abt this again.....it can't be "A"...where does it say r and s are integers ?
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5095
Location: Singapore
Followers: 19

Kudos [?]: 155 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 29 Mar 2005, 21:07
banerjeea_98 wrote:
"C"...come on guys think abt this again.....it can't be "A"...where does it say r and s are integers ?


oops.... didn't think about that part. youre right, we need to consider fractions as well. :-D
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5095
Location: Singapore
Followers: 19

Kudos [?]: 155 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 29 Mar 2005, 21:10
Here's my re-worked solution. Sorry, I alway forget about integers... :oops:

1) Not sufficient. If s and r are integers, then n=4. However, if s and r are not integers, then n=5

2) r and s are not integers. Not sufficient. s and r can be sets of different values, giving no definite value for n.

1 + 2--> Tells us r and s are not integers, so n=5.

Ans:C
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 908
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 30 Mar 2005, 05:45
ywilfred wrote:
Here's my re-worked solution. Sorry, I alway forget about integers... :oops:

1) Not sufficient. If s and r are integers, then n=4. However, if s and r are not integers, then n=5

2) r and s are not integers. Not sufficient. s and r can be sets of different values, giving no definite value for n.

1 + 2--> Tells us r and s are not integers, so n=5.

Ans:C


That's my problem too. I tend to forget about integers and non integers. There is this force in me that keeps assuming everything is an integer. arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrggh!
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 18 Nov 2004
Posts: 1447
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 30 Mar 2005, 06:51
Folaa3 wrote:
ywilfred wrote:
Here's my re-worked solution. Sorry, I alway forget about integers... :oops:

1) Not sufficient. If s and r are integers, then n=4. However, if s and r are not integers, then n=5

2) r and s are not integers. Not sufficient. s and r can be sets of different values, giving no definite value for n.

1 + 2--> Tells us r and s are not integers, so n=5.

Ans:C


That's my problem too. I tend to forget about integers and non integers. There is this force in me that keeps assuming everything is an integer. arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrggh!


"GMAT is out to trick you with integers and non-integers ", if you keep this in back of your mind whenever you see a DS with variables then you will be better off. :-D
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 908
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 30 Mar 2005, 07:30
Thanks Banerjeea_98 !

Thanks everryone for the explanation, the OA is C
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Posts: 2251
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 204 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 30 Mar 2005, 07:36
Actually, if you've forgetten that r and s can be non integer when you look at (1), (2) should serve as a very good reminder for you and you should immediately realize that you need to revisit the question from the beginning.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Mar 2005
Posts: 184
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2005, 19:12
guys the answer should be A only,,,,,becuase it says r-s=5.....

so no matter they are intgers/fractions ,,they always have 5 integers betwwen them,,,

s= 1.2,,,r=6.2 n=5
s=-1.2 ,,,,r=3.8,,,,n= 5(-1,0,1,2,3)

thus answer is A
_________________

i hate when people do'nt post the OA, it leaves in guessing!!!!

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 15 Feb 2005
Posts: 23
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2005, 21:21
Karun,
You're right that r-s=5. But you seem to have overlooked the inequality.

If r and s are integers then n cannot be either of r or s. So that leaves us only 4 integers between r and s

Example:

If 0<n<5

n has only 4 possiblities 1,2,3,4

If 0.5<n<5.5

n has 5 possiblities 1,2,3,4,5

So the answer is C.
  [#permalink] 09 Apr 2005, 21:21
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
How many integers N are there such that R < N < S ? 1) DanNaw 2 01 Mar 2010, 01:38
How many integers 'n' exist such that r < n < s ? 1) s grad_mba 2 26 Jun 2007, 22:05
How many integers n are there such that r<n<s? 1. Sandya21 7 15 Apr 2007, 14:41
How many integers n are there such that r<n<s? 1) ninomoi 5 30 Mar 2007, 12:57
How many integers n are there such that r < n < s? (1) jaynayak 2 17 Jun 2006, 10:14
Display posts from previous: Sort by

How many integers n are there such that r < n < s? (1)

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.