Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 24 Jul 2014, 22:56

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

How much water (in grams) should be added to the

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 1048
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 260 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
How much water (in grams) should be added to the [#permalink] New post 29 Oct 2008, 00:07
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 1 sessions
How much water (in grams) should be added to the 35%-solution of acid to obtain the 10%-solution?

1. There are 50 grams of the 35%-solution
2. In the 35%-solution the ratio of acid to water is 7:13

what is the best way to approach mixture problems ?
_________________

"You have to find it. No one else can find it for you." - Bjorn Borg

Check out my GMAT blog - GMAT Tips and Strategies

1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2008
Posts: 350
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 42 [1] , given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS : Mixtures [#permalink] New post 29 Oct 2008, 00:27
1
This post received
KUDOS
(A)

It is easier to approach the mixture problems by forming grids just like 2D set problems.
(1) gives the value of y and hence x can be calculated.

0.35y = 0.1(x+y)

(2) States that there is 35% of acid in the solution. Doesn't help to find the value of x.

Use this website for the basic mixture problems. Actually, jallenmorris pointed me to the purplemath website.
http://www.purplemath.com/modules/mixture.htm

This will guide you through the methodology and you can google for mixture problems for practice (this is how I learnt how to solve these type of problems- though this kind still haunts me :) )

HTH.
Attachments

misc.jpg
misc.jpg [ 8.07 KiB | Viewed 690 times ]


_________________

To find what you seek in the road of life, the best proverb of all is that which says:
"Leave no stone unturned."
-Edward Bulwer Lytton


Last edited by leonidas on 29 Oct 2008, 00:50, edited 1 time in total.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 840
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 26 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS : Mixtures [#permalink] New post 29 Oct 2008, 00:38
leonidas wrote:
(A)

It is easier to approach the mixture problems by forming grids just like 2D set problems.
(1) gives the value of y and hence x can be calculated.

0.35y = 0.1(x+y)

(2) States that there is 35% of acid in the solution. Doesn't help to find the value of x.

Use this website for the basic mixture problems. Actually, jallenmorris pointed me to the purplemath website.
http://www.purplemath.com/modules/mixture.htm

This will guide you through the methodology and you can google for mixture problems for practice (this is how I learnt how to solve these type of problems- though this kind still haunt me :) )

HTH.



i used this method also but to get D i did this:
Attachments

Book1.xls [13.5 KiB]
Downloaded 71 times

To download please login or register as a user

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2008
Posts: 350
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 42 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS : Mixtures [#permalink] New post 29 Oct 2008, 00:49
bigtreezl wrote:
leonidas wrote:
(A)

It is easier to approach the mixture problems by forming grids just like 2D set problems.
(1) gives the value of y and hence x can be calculated.

0.35y = 0.1(x+y)

(2) States that there is 35% of acid in the solution. Doesn't help to find the value of x.

Use this website for the basic mixture problems. Actually, jallenmorris pointed me to the purplemath website.
http://www.purplemath.com/modules/mixture.htm

This will guide you through the methodology and you can google for mixture problems for practice (this is how I learnt how to solve these type of problems- though this kind still haunt me :) )

HTH.



i used this method also but to get D i did this:


Here the ratio of acid:water in the 35% solution is 7:13. How did you get 13 gms of liquid?
If there is any information about the weight of acid we can use (7/20)* total = (weight of acid) to find the weight of 35% solution (i.e, y in my case). Since, we are not given any weight (gms), (2) is insuff.
_________________

To find what you seek in the road of life, the best proverb of all is that which says:
"Leave no stone unturned."
-Edward Bulwer Lytton

VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 1048
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 260 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS : Mixtures [#permalink] New post 29 Oct 2008, 01:07
OA is A.

Thanks leonidas :) +1!
_________________

"You have to find it. No one else can find it for you." - Bjorn Borg

Check out my GMAT blog - GMAT Tips and Strategies

Re: DS : Mixtures   [#permalink] 29 Oct 2008, 01:07
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic How much water (in grams) should be added to a 35%-solution tania 8 27 Dec 2009, 14:59
2 How much water (in grams) should be added to the abhi758 6 17 Aug 2009, 07:09
How much water (in grams) should be added to the neelesh 2 29 Mar 2008, 11:35
How much water (in grams) should be added to the bmwhype2 3 03 Jan 2008, 08:38
How much water (in grams) should be added to the eyunni 2 04 Nov 2007, 19:28
Display posts from previous: Sort by

How much water (in grams) should be added to the

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.