Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 23 Oct 2014, 04:27

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg.

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 28 Dec 2013
Posts: 43
Location: United States
GPA: 3
WE: Information Technology (Insurance)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 18

Premium Member
How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg. [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2014, 05:43
Can someone plz provide examples for "Due To" and "Because of". I don't quite get the difference. :(

Thanks
_________________

Never give up, never celebrate, never leave your spot until it is finally over
We are winning this GMAT-war together

"Your one spot for all your GMAT and B-school ranking know hows" - Click here

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jan 2013
Posts: 182
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 87 [1] , given: 56

Re: How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg. [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2014, 05:54
1
This post received
KUDOS
janxavier wrote:
Can someone plz provide examples for "Due To" and "Because of". I don't quite get the difference. :(

Thanks


Use 'due to' in cases where you can replace it with 'caused by'

It is not raining in X due to the el nino in the pacific.
Usage of 'due to' is wrong. Replace that with 'caused by', and you will see why.

It is not raining in X because of the el nino in the pacific.
This is correct.

The absence of rains in X is 'due to' el nino in the pacific.
This is correct. The absence of rains is 'caused by' something.

Some abstract noun is due to X.
_________________

Read my posts...
What are modifiers ??

Expert Post
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done!!
Joined: 29 Aug 2012
Posts: 425
Location: India
Followers: 22

Kudos [?]: 334 [0], given: 130

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg. [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2014, 07:58
Expert's post
janxavier wrote:
Can someone plz provide examples for "Due To" and "Because of". I don't quite get the difference. :(

Thanks


Hi,

"Due to" & "Because of" are two different things.

"Due to" denotes that x has happened due to y. In other words, x caused by y.

Rule is : On GMAT "Due to" will never be used to replace "because of". It can only be used to replace "Caused by".

Lets try an example,

The exam was postponed due to bad weather.

It might sound correct but it is not correct. The correct sentence is

The exam was postponed because of bad weather.

In above sentence, if we replace "because of" with "caused by".

The exam was postponed caused by bad weather.

Since it doesn't make any sense so we cannot use "Due to" in this sentence.

But in the below sentence,

The postponement of the exam was caused by the bad weather.

Here caused by makes sense, so we can use "Due to".

The postponement of the exam was due to the bad weather.


For more in-depth please go through this post--- Due to vs Because of

Hope it helps :)
_________________

Believe you can and you're halfway there- Theodore Roosevelt


Rules for posting in Quants Forum || Rules for posting in verbal forum

Improving from V30 to V40 | Improving from Q35-40 to Q47 | Bunuel Special Problem Collections New!!


Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Expert Post
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 01 Sep 2010
Posts: 2441
Followers: 311

Kudos [?]: 2615 [0], given: 696

Re: How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg. [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2014, 10:20
Expert's post
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 Aug 2014
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Because of vs due to [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2014, 08:18
Hi all,

Can anyone help me on when to use "because of" and when to use "due to"?

Thanks in advance.
Expert Post
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done!!
Joined: 29 Aug 2012
Posts: 425
Location: India
Followers: 22

Kudos [?]: 334 [0], given: 130

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Because of vs due to [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2014, 08:37
Expert's post
bhargav63 wrote:
Hi all,

Can anyone help me on when to use "because of" and when to use "due to"?

Thanks in advance.


Merging similar topic. Please go through the above discussion for your query.
_________________

Believe you can and you're halfway there- Theodore Roosevelt


Rules for posting in Quants Forum || Rules for posting in verbal forum

Improving from V30 to V40 | Improving from Q35-40 to Q47 | Bunuel Special Problem Collections New!!


Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Expert Post
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 2142
Followers: 539

Kudos [?]: 2273 [0], given: 31

Re: How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg. [#permalink] New post 14 Aug 2014, 14:42
Expert's post
bhargav63 wrote:
Hi all,

Can anyone help me on when to use "because of" and when to use "due to"?

Thanks in advance.

Dear bhargav63,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

Here's a blog that may help:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom ... nsequence/

The above entries fail to point out --- the word "due" is an adjective. It must modify a particular noun, typically the noun that it touches. By contrast, "because of" introduces an adverbial phrase, that is, a verb-modifying or clause-modifying phrase, so this can modify a verb or an action, and it can fall anywhere in the sentence.

The school committee canceled the picnic, because of rain.
This is correct. The "because of" clause modifies the verb "canceled."

The school committee canceled the picnic, due to rain.
This would be common in colloquial English, but this is wildly incorrect. This sentence is implying that the picnic itself was caused by rain or founded on the theme of rain, which is entirely illogical and not what the writer is trying to say.

"due to" modifies nouns. It can't modify a verb or a whole clause.
"because of" modifiers verbs & clauses & actions. It can't modify a noun.

For this reason, we can use "due to" after a form of the verb "to be"
The cancellation was due to rain. = correct
It is incorrect and unidiomatic to use "because of" in this structure
The cancellation was because of rain.

For this distinction, and for many others, you may find these free GMAT idiom flashcards helpful:
https://gmat.magoosh.com/flashcards/idioms

Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg. [#permalink] New post 16 Aug 2014, 00:08
mikemcgarry wrote:
bhargav63 wrote:
Hi all,

Can anyone help me on when to use "because of" and when to use "due to"?

Thanks in advance.

Dear bhargav63,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

Here's a blog that may help:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom ... nsequence/

The above entries fail to point out --- the word "due" is an adjective. It must modify a particular noun, typically the noun that it touches. By contrast, "because of" introduces an adverbial phrase, that is, a verb-modifying or clause-modifying phrase, so this can modify a verb or an action, and it can fall anywhere in the sentence.

The school committee canceled the picnic, because of rain.
This is correct. The "because of" clause modifies the verb "canceled."

The school committee canceled the picnic, due to rain.
This would be common in colloquial English, but this is wildly incorrect. This sentence is implying that the picnic itself was caused by rain or founded on the theme of rain, which is entirely illogical and not what the writer is trying to say.

"due to" modifies nouns. It can't modify a verb or a whole clause.
"because of" modifiers verbs & clauses & actions. It can't modify a noun.

For this reason, we can use "due to" after a form of the verb "to be"
The cancellation was due to rain. = correct
It is incorrect and unidiomatic to use "because of" in this structure
The cancellation was because of rain.

For this distinction, and for many others, you may find these free GMAT idiom flashcards helpful:
https://gmat.magoosh.com/flashcards/idioms

Mike :-)


Hi Mike,

Can you please explain my doubt here : originally-developed-by-ancient-hawaiians-surfing-appeals-102734.html#p1393602

The doubt deals with "due to" vs "because of".
_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 2142
Followers: 539

Kudos [?]: 2273 [1] , given: 31

Re: How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg. [#permalink] New post 16 Aug 2014, 12:21
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
kinjiGC wrote:
Hi Mike,

Can you please explain my doubt here : originally-developed-by-ancient-hawaiians-surfing-appeals-102734.html#p1393602

The doubt deals with "due to" vs "because of".

Dear kinjiGC,
Yes, I am happy to help. :-)

First of all, let's think about the Modifier Touch Rule. This is usually true. This is NOT 100% true. What are the most common exceptions?
1) a vital noun modifier can come between a noun and a noun-vital modifier; the noun-vital modifier would not touch the noun. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... modifiers/
2) a short list of examples ---- "... leafy-green vegetables, such as lettuce or kale, which contain .." The "which" clause clearly refers to "vegetables", not "kale." This is known exception to the touch rule.
3) a short predicate ---- "The manager was fired who embezzled several thousand ..." The "who" clearly refers to "manager", even though a short predicate intervenes.

Now, the word "due" is an adjective, a noun modifier, so it obeys the Modifier Touch Rule, and is subject to the common exceptions to the Touch Rule. How "short" does a short predicate have to be so that its intervening presence doesn't constitute a problem with the Touch Rule? Well, to some extent, that's a judgment call, a matter of taste. This is the part of grammar that is not mathematical and precise --- there's some wiggle room here.

In the sentence:
"... surfing appeals to people due to the sport’s unusual confluence of adrenaline, skill, and high paced maneuvering, ..."
Well, that predicate, coming between the target noun "surfing" and the modifier "due" is relatively short --- only three words. Furthermore, the phrase "to people" is idiomatically bound to the verb "appeals" --- we can't put it elsewhere in the sentence, because it would disrupt the idiom. This is not a "vital modifier", because that concept applies only to noun modifiers, but immediacy of contact that the structure "to people" demands is analogous to the demand of a vital noun modifier. Therefore, these three words need to go together, and even all together, it's only a three-word predicate --- hardly a big interruption between the target noun and its proper modifier. This is well within the valid exceptions to the touch rule.

Yes, that idiomatic phrase contains a second noun, and couldn't we read "due" as illogically applying to "people"? Well, that reading disregards the tight idiomatic relationship between "to people" and "appeals."

Having said all this, I am not 100% happy with this question. Technically "surfing" is not "due to the sport’s unusual confluence of ..." Rather, the "appeal" is "due to" all that. Technically, this is a use of the adjective "due to" as a verb-modifier, which in my understanding is 100% wrong. Admittedly, this use is rampant in colloquial English, and this may be a rare instance in which the GMAT has slightly more relaxed standards than do we grammatical purists. I don't know how old that particular question is: I have seen other older questions contain subtle mistakes such as this or questionable elements, and those questions were eliminated from future editions. Sometimes, the folks who write the GMAT are not perfect. I am not sure how relaxed the GMAT standards are on this, but it's very good to know the rule and all its exceptions with great precision.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Re: How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg.   [#permalink] 16 Aug 2014, 12:21
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic Because of vs due to Gnpth 0 13 Aug 2014, 08:37
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg. janxavier 8 09 Jul 2014, 05:43
Due To & because of sanjeebpanda 1 03 Jul 2013, 13:51
56 Experts publish their posts in the topic Due to Vs Because of egmat 23 09 Oct 2012, 17:37
due to vs because tt11234 6 21 Aug 2010, 08:37
Display posts from previous: Sort by

How To Debunk Due To / Because of? Provide Eg.

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.