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How to find the authors attitude towards passage?

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Senior Manager
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How to find the authors attitude towards passage? [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2009, 10:50
Request you to please explain the authors attitude towards passage.

Eg
Practically speaking, the artistic maturing of the cinema was the single-handed achievement of David W. Griffith (1875-1948). Before Griffith, photography in dramatic films consisted of little more than placing the actors before a stationary camera and showing them in full length as they would have appeared on stage. From the beginning of his career as a director, however, Griffith, because of his love of Victorian painting, employed composition. He conceived of the camera image as having a foreground and a rear ground, as well as the middle distance preferred by most directors. By 1910 he was using close-ups to reveal significant details of the scene or of the acting and extreme long shots to achieve a sense of spectacle and distance. His appreciation of the camera’s possibilities produced novel dramatic effects. By splitting an event into fragments and recording each from the most suitable camera position, he could significantly vary the emphasis from camera shot to camera shot.
Griffith also achieved dramatic effects by means of creative editing. By juxtaposing images and varying the speed and rhythm of their presentation, he could control the dramatic intensity of the events as the story progressed. Despite the reluctance of his producers, who feared that the public would not be able to follow a plot that was made up of such juxtaposed images, Griffith persisted, and experimented as well with other elements of cinematic syntax that have become standard ever since. These included the flashback, permitting broad psychological and emotional exploration as well as narrative that was not chronological, and the crosscut between two parallel actions to heighten suspense and excitement. In thus exploiting fully the possibilities of editing, Griffith transposed devices of the Victorian novel to film and gave film mastery of time as well as space.
Besides developing the cinema’s language, Griffith immensely broadened its range and treatment of subjects. His early output was remarkably eclectic: it included not only the standard comedies, melodramas, westerns, and thrillers, but also such novelties as adaptations from Browning and Tennyson, and treatments of social issues. As his successes mounted, his ambitions grew, and with them the whole of American cinema. When he remade Enoch Arden in 1911, he insisted that a subject of such importance could not be treated in the then conventional length of one reel. Griffith’s introduction of the American-made multireel picture began an immense revolution. Two years later, Judith of Bethulia, an elaborate historicophilosophical spectacle, reached the unprecedented length of four reels, or one hour’s running time. From our contemporary viewpoint, the pretensions of this film may seem a trifle ludicrous, but at the time it provoked endless debate and discussion and gave a new intellectual respectability to the cinema.

27. The author’s attitude toward photography in the cinema before Griffith can best be described as
(A) Sympathetic
(B) nostalgic
(C) Amused
(D) Condescending
(E) hostile


Oa is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
d


Please explain teh attitude here?
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Re: How to find the authors attitude towards passage? [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2009, 11:09
to look for the tone, you need to practice noticing the tone-conveying-words or phrases while reading.

For ex, the tone of author towards photography "before griffith" can be seen in places like:

Practically speaking, the artistic maturing of the cinema was the single-handed achievement of David W. Griffith (1875-1948). Before Griffith, photography in dramatic films consisted of little more than placing the actors before a stationary camera and showing them in full length as they would have appeared on stage . From the beginning of his career as a director, however, Griffith, because of his love of Victorian painting, employed composition.

The underlined portion would tell you that the author is not very appreciative or respectful about the earlier photography. when he compares it to griffith's contributions, he looks down upon them.

You may want to think about the tone of the author before you look at the answer options, then you can be more confident when you see a choice matching your answer.
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Re: How to find the authors attitude towards passage? [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2009, 03:39
i think if u know the meaning of the standard tones used in the passages, u will be able to easily eliminate 3 out of 5 choices.. remember the correct answer will always be different from the wrong answers.. if u r stuck between the choices that u find almost similar and having hard time eliminating either if them, then check the question once more coz if the logic is correct then u will end up getting the correct answer and nothing else.. :wink:
check for the words that modifies other words in passage.. coz those could indicate the tone of the passage..
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Re: How to find the authors attitude towards passage? [#permalink] New post 18 Jul 2009, 10:03
Thanks, will help!
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Re: How to find the authors attitude towards passage?   [#permalink] 18 Jul 2009, 10:03
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