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Human beings can see the spatial relations among objects by

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Human beings can see the spatial relations among objects by [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 18:46
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A
B
C
D
E

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Human beings can see the spatial relations among objects by processing information conveyed by light. Scientists trying to build computers that can detect spatial relations by the same kind of process have so far designed and built stationary machines. However, these scientists will not achieve their goal until they produce such a machine that can move around in its environment.
Which of the following, if true, would best support the prediction above?
(A) Human beings are dependent on visual cues from motion in order to detect spatial relations.
(B) Human beings can often easily detect the spatial relations among objects, even when those objects are in motion.
(C) Detecting spatial relations among objects requires drawing inferences from the information conveyed by light.
(D) Although human beings can discern spatial relations through their sense of hearing, vision is usually the most important means of detecting spatial relations.
(E) Information about the spatial relations among objects can be obtained by noticing such things as shadows and the relative sizes of objects.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 21:01
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Will go with A.

If motion is important to detect spatial relationships, stationary machines even though they have the capability to process light won't be able to detect spatial relationships.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 21:13
Will go with A.

talks about spatial relationship in human and motion.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 22:18
A

If humans are dependent on "visual clues from motion" then it means that scientists are mimicking the humans. So scientists can't achieve their goals without taking the above into consideration.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Aug 2006, 05:25
thanks, guys ! OA in the answers section at the bottom of 1000CR is 'B' which does not makes sense.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Aug 2006, 11:55
I went with B, the reason being is that the scientists are trying to perfect the machines to do what humans can do, that is to detect spatial relations between objects while the objects are in motion as mentioned in below bold statement.

However, these scientists will not achieve their goal until they produce such a machine that can move around in its environment.

I did not choose A because although it states that humans depend on visual cues, why would the passage say that the scientists will not achieve their goal until such a machine can move around in its environment? So, A seems a bit lacking.

C is wrong to me because it seems rather broad.

D seems out of scope since nothing was mentioned that humans can identify spatial relations through "hearing", but passages main focus was on "light."

E is also out of scope, and just a broad statement similar to C.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2006, 01:29
I initially chose C here and then stopped the timere and carefully reread the passage.

Actually (B) does make more sense because the argument is based around the premise of detecting spacial relations among two or more objects. A implies that the visual cues are used to detect spacial relations between the person and the object being watched.

Good CR. Marked for error log review.
  [#permalink] 17 Aug 2006, 01:29
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