Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 27 Jul 2014, 22:16

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

I am confused about the usage of these two idioms. Say I had

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: 700 (q47,v40); AWA 6.0
Joined: 16 Mar 2011
Posts: 82
GMAT 1: 700 Q47 V40
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 40 [0], given: 3

I am confused about the usage of these two idioms. Say I had [#permalink] New post 03 May 2011, 21:22
I am confused about the usage of these two idioms. Say I had a sentence:

The cops would not allow traffic move so long as the the road was being repaired.

The cops would not allow traffic move as long as the the road was being repaired.


Which one of them is correct? To me, the second option sounds more formal and smoother to understand. My concern is about which option would be GMAT-approved.

Please observe that this is a sentence example that I conceived as I compose the post and is not picked from any source.

But the question comes from reading thru some idioms list I was preparing for my selves.

Regards
Rahul
_________________

Regards
Rahul

Kaplan GMAT Prep Discount CodesKnewton GMAT Discount CodesGMAT Pill GMAT Discount Codes
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Mar 2010
Posts: 65
Location: Hyderabad, India
WE 1: Deloitte 3 yrs
WE 2: Prok going on
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [1] , given: 2

Re: "So long as" vs "as long as" [#permalink] New post 04 May 2011, 01:04
1
This post received
KUDOS
retro wrote:
I am confused about the usage of these two idioms. Say I had a sentence:

The cops would not allow traffic move so long as the the road was being repaired.

The cops would not allow traffic move as long as the the road was being repaired.


Which one of them is correct? To me, the second option sounds more formal and smoother to understand. My concern is about which option would be GMAT-approved.

Please observe that this is a sentence example that I conceived as I compose the post and is not picked from any source.

But the question comes from reading thru some idioms list I was preparing for my selves.

Regards
Rahul




Rahul,

To be honest there are no considerable differences between the two:
http://books.google.com/books?id=2yJusP0vrdgC&a...

But as long as is used more often than so long as. Both are used in the sense "provided that".

Sometimes people think that as long as is used only in a comparative tone and other one is not used...like:

as big as
as cool as
as long as etc.

But I don't agree fully to this. Anyways check the following example:

The new national highway is not as long as the old one.

The new national highway is not so long as the old one.

In the above example we are using them to refer to length of the highway, we can use for time as well as you did.

But moral of the story is: They both are used interchangeably and mean "provided that".

I hope you find this explanation useful :)
_________________

Akhil Mittal

I have not failed. I've just found 10000 ways that won't work. Thomas A. Edison

If my post was helpful to you then encourage me by your kudos :)

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: 700 (q47,v40); AWA 6.0
Joined: 16 Mar 2011
Posts: 82
GMAT 1: 700 Q47 V40
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 40 [0], given: 3

Re: "So long as" vs "as long as" [#permalink] New post 04 May 2011, 03:59
Akhil, I agree with your view that both are the same. That is exactly what my problem is. In one practise question, I found that this made a difference. I went with the more formal choice, which is "as long as", but the guide thought otherwise. Hence the question.

I'd keenly await what GMAT trainers think about this distinction.

Regards
Rahul
_________________

Regards
Rahul

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Jul 2010
Posts: 271
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 37 [0], given: 9

GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: "So long as" vs "as long as" [#permalink] New post 04 May 2011, 09:16
Can you post that practice question?
_________________

If you like my post, consider giving me some KUDOS !!!!! Like you I need them

VP
VP
avatar
Status: There is always something new !!
Affiliations: PMI,QAI Global,eXampleCG
Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 1365
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 132 [0], given: 10

GMAT Tests User
Re: "So long as" vs "as long as" [#permalink] New post 05 May 2011, 00:49
in the second sentence as long as = unless and untill.
so long as - describes the delay instead.
.
Hence B is correct
_________________

Visit -- http://www.sustainable-sphere.com/
Promote Green Business,Sustainable Living and Green Earth !!

Re: "So long as" vs "as long as"   [#permalink] 05 May 2011, 00:49
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
I am sending a list of Idioms with their usages which I amirdubai1982 0 25 Dec 2010, 01:17
1 I am confused skg 8 19 Aug 2009, 13:22
I am so confused....:( :) lhotseface 24 08 Mar 2007, 17:12
I AM CONFUSED blessingame 1 25 Oct 2005, 21:11
I am confused about this one.... Temperature measurements FN 5 27 Jul 2005, 18:16
Display posts from previous: Sort by

I am confused about the usage of these two idioms. Say I had

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.