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I like to run through forests more than I enjoy walking

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I like to run through forests more than I enjoy walking [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2012, 07:40
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I like to run through forests more than I enjoy walking through crowds .

In the above sentence infinitive ( to run) , gerund ( walking) are not parallel in structure.

I like to run through forests more than I enjoy to walk through crowds .

Is the above sentence correct? If not , please explain
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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: comparisons strategy [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2012, 08:47
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Dear TomB

It's true there's a parallel-structure problem in the first sentence, but the second sentence is far from correct. Among other things, the verb "enjoy" idiomatically takes the gerund, not the infinitive.
1a) I enjoy watching baseball. (correct)
1b) I enjoy to watch baseball. (awkward and wrong)

Furthermore, we already have the verb "like" --- that single verb is sufficient to cover both terms of the parallel structure --- we don't need a second verb. Here are a couple possible corrections:

2a) I like to run through forests more than to walk through crowds.
2b) I like running through forests more than walking through crowds.
2c) I enjoy running through forests more than walking through crowds.
All three of those are now correct. Notice, while the verb "enjoy" can only take the gerund, the verb "like" can take either the gerund or the infinitive.

These sentences, while correct, are not quite worth of the GMAT because they have an air of colloquialism. They are not formal enough. A more typical GMAT sentence would not be in the first-person and would use somewhat more elevated language.

Unlike Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau had far more of a penchant for lingering in the stillness of the forest than for soaking up the energy of a bustling crowd.

Now, that's a GMAT SC type sentence --- historical figures, formal language, comparisons at different levels, and parallel structure.

Does all that make sense? Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :-)
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Last edited by mikemcgarry on 20 Aug 2012, 13:25, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: comparisons strategy [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2012, 11:52
Hi mike

Thank you very much for your explanation

1) Unlike Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau had far more of penchant for lingering in the stillness of the forest than for soaking up the energy of a bustling crowd.

In the above sentence

comparison signal : more than.

There is a comparison between 2 prepositional phrases " of penchant in the stillness....." and " for soaking up....". Is that correct

please explain
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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: comparisons strategy [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2012, 13:29
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TomB wrote:
Hi mike
Thank you very much for your explanation
1) Unlike Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau had far more of a penchant for lingering in the stillness of the forest than for soaking up the energy of a bustling crowd.

In the above sentence, there is a comparison between 2 prepositional phrases " of penchant in the stillness....." and " for soaking up....". Is that correct
please explain

The noun "penchant" idiomatically takes a prepositional phrase beginning with the preposition "for." Therefore, the parallel elements are the two prepositions that begin with "for" ----
(a) for lingering in the stillness of the forest
(b) for soaking up the energy of a bustling crowd
Notice, in both cases, the object of the preposition "for" is a gerund.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
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Re: comparisons strategy   [#permalink] 20 Aug 2012, 13:29
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I like to run through forests more than I enjoy walking

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