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I thought that the idiom is 'prohibited from', but got this

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I thought that the idiom is 'prohibited from', but got this [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2011, 06:38
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A
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80% (01:56) correct 20% (00:00) wrong based on 10 sessions

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I thought that the idiom is 'prohibited from', but got this wrong.
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Re: I thought that the idiom is 'prohibited from', but got this [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2015, 10:47
The phrase "prohibit sb from" should be followed by present participle.
Why is the answer c correct ? Because it is "prohibit something", the "to" modifies the disclosure, not to go with prohibit. Moreover, the disclosing sounds a little awkward
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Re: I thought that the idiom is 'prohibited from', but got this [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2015, 20:43
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The idiom is 'prohibit x from'; being a transitive verb, it takes an object immediately after. It would be ok, if it was 'prohibit X', where X could be any person, phenomenon or object pronouns such as him, her or them. B is wrong because the plural 'them' doesn't tally with the singular employee.

In C, the agreement is prohibiting a phenomenon namely 'disclosure'. Hence, it is correct.
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Re: I thought that the idiom is 'prohibited from', but got this   [#permalink] 19 Dec 2015, 20:43
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I thought that the idiom is 'prohibited from', but got this

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