Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 25 Oct 2014, 18:13

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Ideally, scientific laws should display the virtues of

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

Ideally, scientific laws should display the virtues of [#permalink] New post 24 May 2005, 17:13
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
Ideally, scientific laws should display the virtues of precision and generality, as do the laws of physics. However, because of the nature of their subject matter, laws of social science often have to use terms that are imprecise; for example, one knows only vaguely what is meant by "republicanism" or "class". As for generality, laws that apply only in certain social systems are typically the only ones possible for the social sciences.

Which one of the following statements is most strongly supported by the information above?

A) All else being equal, a precise, general scientific law is to be prefered over one that is not
B) The social sciences would benefit if they redirected their focus to the subject matter of teh physical sciences.
C) Terms such as "class" should be more precisely formulated by social scientists.
D) Social scientists should make an effort to construct more loaws that apply to all socities
E) The laws of social sciences are invariably not truly scientific.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 13 Jan 2005
Posts: 331
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 24 May 2005, 17:47
E it is.

GA
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Mar 2005
Posts: 48
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 24 May 2005, 19:43
I think it is A.

A. "Ideally, scientific laws should display the virtues of precision and generality, as do the laws of physics" supports this statement
B. benefits are out of scope
C. Some imprecise terms are necessary bcos of the nature of the subject matter. So, doing this won't solve anything.
D. Nothing in the passage tells us that this should be done.
E. extreme. often doesn't mean invariably not scientific
_________________

krish

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 02 Jun 2005, 10:19
Bumping up this thread to get more participation. Please explain your ACs.
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 18 Nov 2004
Posts: 1447
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 02 Jun 2005, 10:57
"E"

A...no one is talking abt preferring one to the other
B....out of scope
C....out of scope
D.....again out of scope
E.....By the definition of truly scientific laws, social sc doesn't fit the bill...correct choice
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Apr 2005
Posts: 167
Location: Atlanta , GA
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 02 Jun 2005, 19:04
Another one for E
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Apr 2005
Posts: 377
Location: India
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 02 Jun 2005, 19:19
I too vote for E.

I'll try and explain why the only other answer A is not OK.

There is nothing which suggest that precision/generality is better than ones which are now, we only know one thing for certain, the charecteristics of a scientific idea , and we are also told that Social science don't comply to it, so the only thing we can "safely" conclude is that SS are not scientific.

HMTG.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5095
Location: Singapore
Followers: 19

Kudos [?]: 155 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 02 Jun 2005, 19:36
A) All else being equal, a precise, general scientific law is to be prefered over one that is not
- nothing in the passage suggest this

B) The social sciences would benefit if they redirected their focus to the subject matter of teh physical sciences.
- not supported for

C) Terms such as "class" should be more precisely formulated by social scientists.
- not supported for

D) Social scientists should make an effort to construct more loaws that apply to all socities
- not supported for

E) The laws of social sciences are invariably not truly scientific.

E is the best. The two premises indicate that laws of social sciences are not truly scientific since they cannot achieve the ideal scientific laws, that is, to possess virtues of precision and generality
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 05 Jan 2005
Posts: 561
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2005, 11:20
my vote for (E)
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 22 Jun 2005, 05:15
The OA is A. Could someone explain how the author reaches this conclusion?

From LSAT material:

"The first sentence of the passage indicates that generality is a virtue of scientific laws. This implies that greater generality makes one scientific law preferable to a competing scientific law, provided that the competing law is not superior in terms of some other virtue. So (A) is strongly supported by the information in the first sentence"


Could someone explain the "leap of faith" taken by the author. How does the first sentence in the passage stem enable us to reach conclusions on "preferrences" [all else being equal, a precise, general scientific law is preferred over one that is not general].

I can see why B, D, E are wrong.
  [#permalink] 22 Jun 2005, 05:15
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Ideally, the professional career diplomat should help in the christykarunya 0 17 Sep 2013, 00:39
In Law School, Realized should be MBA timpriot 0 02 Dec 2012, 14:38
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic ) Ideally, groups focused on environmental justice should be aimkp 7 04 Nov 2010, 03:13
When should one ideally re-install the GMAT Prep software? sid3699 3 25 Sep 2009, 05:32
Consumer advocate: The toy-labeling law should require eyunni 14 09 Oct 2007, 06:31
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Ideally, scientific laws should display the virtues of

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.